‘My baby told me he was tired’: First-grader who shot himself may have been bullied to death, parents say

Seven-year-old Jeffery Taylor told his parents that kids at school called him the n-word, ‘blacky’ and ugly.

SAN ANTONIO — Jermaine and LaKeisha Chaney, who have seven children, are still mourning the loss of their youngest son, Jeffery Taylor.

“It’s been a struggle. I put on this beautiful face, but inside I hurt because I miss my baby,” LaKeisha said.

Taylor loved God, church music, boxing, hats, costumes and pranks. The 7-year-old was known for being the first one up or getting up in the middle of the night for snacks, only to be found sleeping on the couch in the morning.

“He wasn’t a bad child,” Jermaine said.

Now, their home on Channel View in southeast San Antonio seems silent without his presence. For the grieving couple, the noise of their anguish bangs loud as a drum.

“A lot of people don’t know his story,” LaKeisha said.

The hurting mother said that on Dec. 20, 2019, her son got off the bus with his head hanging down.

“Why are you so sad? This is the last day of school?” she said. “Shouldn’t you be happy?  (It’s) Christmas break?”

According to his mother, he said, “I should, but I’m not happy. I want to get away from that school. They don’t listen to me. They don’t like me.”

She said Taylor alleged students from various grades called him the “N-word,” “Blacky,” “snaggletooth” and ugly. According to the Chaneys, the students went as far as destroying her son’s shoes and a pair of boots.

“It just seems like he just was being targeted and picked on,” Jermaine said. “He was just that one person that stood out.”

At a parent/teacher conference, his mother said her son’s desk sat segregated from the rest of the class. They said he was the only Black student.  The teacher reportedly said Taylor might have been having issues with other students.

“No matter what I said to him that Friday, the day before,” LaKeshia said, “it wasn’t enough because he was already broken.”

The Chaneys said they kissed their sleeping children goodnight after returning from an outing on Dec. 20. The following day, the mother said, she thought it odd Taylor was not up. She asked a sibling to check on him.

Everyone around her was crying. 

“When I went to that room, all I could do is just scream,” Jermaine said. “I just ran back out screaming at my wife. She couldn’t hear me.”

Her daughter pulled the earbuds playing gospel music from her mother’s ear. LaKeisha said her daughter said her brother felt hard.

“I went straight to the room. I saw my baby laying there, like he normally is,” she said. “But when I looked to the left, I saw my gun. And I saw dry blood on my baby’s face.”

His mother said she screamed and screamed more. She said she grabbed her son.

“And I just started holding Jeffery in my arms. My baby was hard as a rock. Just hard as a rock,” she said. “I put him back…and all I could do was run.”

San Antonio Police officials responded to the home for a shooting in progress call. The 7-year-old boy died at home. 

Investigators called the shooting an accident, but they didn’t say if they looked for signs of suicide.

“How could this happen?” Jermaine said. 

The couple, who said they train to handle guns, thought their kids were unaware of firearms in the home. Taylor, according to his parents, did not even have play guns.

LaKeisha said her son found the gun in a Bible case under her bed. The couple accepts the responsibility for the first-grader finding the weapon. But the reason he retrieved it, in their mind, may tilt beyond accidental.

“I’m not sure what to think because my baby told me he was tired,” LaKeisha said. “With that different voice.”

His parents believe the incidents at school may be to blame.

Taylor attended Salado Elementary School in the East Central Independent School District. The system released the following statement about the allegations and Taylor’s death:

East Central ISD profoundly mourns the loss of Jeffery Taylor. He was a bright and well-liked student and we still, to this day, are in shock and disbelief over this tragedy. Our tight-knit community is filled with love, sorrow, and remembrance for Jeffery and his family. We continue to express our deepest condolences to his family, and our community is united in our compassion for healing and strength.

“We are saddened to hear about the allegations as any form of bullying, harassment, or violence is taken seriously and follows required state law, board policy, and District procedures. The District completed a thorough investigation with many teachers, staff, and classmates to determine if any bullying occurred. The investigation did not produce information to corroborate the allegations. The findings of the investigation were in a letter sent to the family on January 8, 2020.

“We investigated the allegations further at three levels: Salado Elementary, student services, and the superintendent. All investigations did not support the allegations.

“Approximately a little over a month before the incident occurred in 2019, Jeffery’s teacher had a regularly scheduled parent conference with the mother. Bullying was never mentioned in the parent conference. No reports or complaints were ever filed or brought to the attention of Jeffery’s teacher, school, or District office.

“East Central ISD provides ongoing training to its staff regarding bullying prevention and identification. Jeffery’s teacher had completed this training prior to the incident. 

“After Jeffery’s passing, East Central ISD offered counseling and bereavement services to the Taylor family multiple times. The District also provided extensive support to friends and classmates of Jeffery.

“East Central ISD stands proudly united in our commitment to inclusion and diversity. Our schools participate in lessons regarding bullying prevention every October and offer many events for the students and community regarding inclusion. Our East Central Police Department has an active presence daily on campuses and promotes “see something, say something” as part of Operation Safe Schools. Our equity committee and task force continue to be proactive in assessing that our system protocols and procedures continue to be equitable and inclusive. 

“East Central ISD again expresses its deepest condolences and continues to be a source of support and healing.”

In three audio recordings obtained by KENS 5, ESCISD Superintendent Roland Toscano met with LaKeisha, a minister’s alliance supporting Taylor and his grandmother.

Toscano said his investigation revealed Taylor had no academic issues. The elementary school student, described as a leader, had no problem calling out students who did not align with school rules. That, Toscano said, may have caused some contention.

Toscano talked about the challenges of getting solid accounts from students for such a serious investigation on the recordings.

But Taylor’s defenders said he never got a chance to list his alleged offenders due to his death.

The school leader said if a person feels bullied, that perception remains valid to the victim.

The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline is a hotline for individuals in crisis or for those looking to help someone else. To speak with a certified listener, call 1-800-273-8255.

DARK HORSE Inside the world of ‘bronies’- the men who love My Little Pony & are linked with neo-Nazism & shootings

MY Little Pony is supposed to be a harmless kids show, but a hardcore following of adult fans have twisted it into something darker.

Animal porn and white supremacy have long been associated with the surreal subculture — which is now being linked with a mass shooting too.

Brandon Scott Hole’s final Facebook post expressed a desire to be with a My Little Pony character in ‘the afterlife’ before his killing spree in IndianaCredit: The Mega Agency

Hole shot eight dead and then himself in an attack on a FedEx facility where he used to workCredit: Imagn Content Services

Last week, 19-year-old Brandon Scott Hole shot eight people dead at a FedEx facility in Indianapolis where he’s believed to have previously worked.

The teen, who killed himself after the attack, posted a bizarre message on Facebook less than an hour before he opened fire. 

“I hope that I can be with Applejack in the afterlife, my life has no meaning without her,” the post read, according to the Wall Street Journal

The post was reportedly accompanied by a picture of Applejack, one of the main characters from the children’s TV series My Little Pony: Friendship is Magic.

Characters from the My Little Pony: Friendship is Magic TV series have become an obsession for ‘bronies’

Bronies at BronyCon in Baltimore in 2019 – it’s a quirky hobby for many, but some use the subculture to spread dark ideasCredit: AFP

An internal Facebook memo obtained by the Journal says Hole had two Facebook accounts which mostly focused on My Little Pony. 

Adult fans of the show refer to themselves as “bronies” — a portmanteau of the words “bro” and “ponies” — and as a group they’ve “displayed elements of far-right and white nationalist extremism,” the memo said, though there’s no sign that was what motivated Hole’s attack. 

While the overwhelming majority of bronies are just sincere fans of the series, online forums have been infested with extreme porn and racist messaging for years — and have even been linked with real world violence before. 

Kids show with adult fans

My Little Pony had happily cantered along for decades as an innocuous brand for kids long before online forums became obsessed with it. 

Hasbro began manufacturing the range of toys in 1981, but the series’ characters didn’t gain a widespread adult following until the launch of the animated kids series My Little Pony: Friendship is Magic in 2010.

The cartoon, which ran from 2010-2019, was aimed at kids and covered themes of friendship and kindnessCredit: BBC

The series soon attracted an adult audience and a market of conventions and merchandise spread in recent yearsCredit: AFP

The show follows a group of magical pony friends with names like Twilight Sparkle and Rainbow Dash on their adventures in a fantasy world called Equestria.

In the years since it first aired, the brony subculture built in online forums including 4Chan, an anonymous image board site now linked with a seemingly endless list of scandals. 

But it soon spilled offline too, with brony conventions attracting thousands of likeminded fans from around the world to meet up in person.

And there’s even a hardcore following in the UK who’ve been outspoken in defending their interest, arguing that most bronies are just well-intentioned hobbyists.

Sam Harris, a British brony, has defended the subculture from critics who see it as dangerousCredit: BBC

“Some people seem to think it’s sexual attraction to the characters,” Sam Harris, organiser of the Severn Bronies, told the BBC.

“Or that they might want to do things with actual horses, or they collect the cuddly toys to do lewd things to them, that kind of thing is sensationalist hype and completely untrue.

“If anyone thinks it’s strange or unusual, I’d just say, there are so many different types of people in the world who enjoy various different things and as long as it makes them happy, and it doesn’t hurt them, what does it matter?”

Horse porn and white supremacy

In recent years, concerns have been raised about some of the content that is being shared on a daily basis on dedicated brony sites. 

And despite Harris’ insistence, there are some bronies who do sexualise the characters.

Sexualised drawings of the characters from My Little Pony are regularly shared onlineCredit: derpibooru

Sometimes referred to as “cloppers”, these users commission and share pornographic images of the kids TV show characters.

And there’s also been well-documented threads of neo-Nazi and white supremacist content spread throughout the subculture.

One fan-made character, Aryanne, is often depicted wearing an SS uniform with a pink heart marking on her hip which contains a swastika. 

The alarming cross-over between the alt-right and bronies might also have a serious grounding in the UK too.

Bronies have created the Nazi character Aryanne and have used My Little Pony to spread white supremacist hateCredit: .

An anonymous blogger known as Buttercup Dew ran a site called My Nationalist Pony which used the children’s characters to spread white nationalist ideas. 

The writer claimed to be a man in their 20s from south London in a 2014 interview with Counter Currents

“I was raised here and have never lived significantly far from here, so I’ve always been on top of a Ground Zero for white displacement,” they said. 

They added that they were specifically preaching white nationalism to bronies because they are: “an implicitly (and heavily) white group of young men, who are suffering from a total disillusionment with modern life, casting around for an identity and meaningful purpose.

An anonymous blogger purporting to be from London ran a site dedicated to a white nationalist interpretation of My Little PonyCredit: .

“Basically, the target demographic that White Nationalism needs to capture if whites are to survive. 

“Despite a healthy crop of alienated losers seeking inclusion, the presence and sheer scale of the ‘brony’ fandom cannot be underestimated.”

Brony bloodshed

Bronies have been implicated in murder cases even before last week’s bloodshed. 

Joshua Charles Acosta, a soldier of the US Army, murdered three people at their home in Los Angeles in 2016.

Joshua Charles Acosta, a reported member of a brony group, killed three people in LA in 2016Credit: Orange County Register

Acosta, who was 23 at the time of the attack, shot dead the mother, stepfather, and a family friend of a teenage girl he believed to be freeing from an abusive family situation. 

He met the teenager through furry and brony groups, NBC Los Angelesreports, with the former referring to people who are interested in dressing up as animals with human qualities. 

Two girls aged six and nine were in the house at the time of the bloodbath. 

On a 911 call played in court, the six-year-old can be heard saying: “My dad is in the backyard dead and my mom is dead in bed…”

Acosta was jailed for life in 2018.

Investigators at the scene of the shooting in Indianapolis which saw eight people shot dead last weekCredit: Indianapolis Star-USA TODAY NETWORK

While investigators hoped to discover a motive for Hole’s massacre in Indianapolis last week, the search continues. 

He was placed under psychiatric detention by police last spring after his mother reported concerns that he was contemplating “suicide by cop”, according to the FBI.

A shotgun was taken from his home, but when he was cleared of harbouring “racially motivated violent extremism ideology”, he was able to legally buy assault rifles in July and September.

Police say he was seen using both weapons during the shooting, which left four members of the local Sikh community dead. 

The Sikh Coalition has called for an investigation into “bias as a possible motive” in the killings, though investigators are yet to establish a motive. 

The FedEx attack is the deadliest attack on the Sikh community in the US since 2012, when a white supremacist killed seven at a Sikh temple in Wisconsin.

Moment white supremacist is engulfed in flames after pouring petrol on synagogue

Tristan Morgan splashed fuel through a window at Exeter Synagogue but took the full blast of the explosion in his face

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This is the moment an arsonist set fire to a synagogue – but ensured an instant comeuppance.

Tristan Morgan, 51, was caught on camera pouring petrol on the religious building and set it alight.

But he is then seen taking the full blast of the explosion in his face in central Exeter, Devon.

The white supremacist was given an indefinite hospital order at the Old Bailey in London today.

He pleaded guilty to arson and two charges under the Terrorism Act, Plymouth Live says.

The footage, played in court, shows Morgan splash fuel through a window at Exeter Synagogue and, despite getting engulf in flames, he calmly walks away.

Morgan pats his singed head and drives off in a Mercedes Vito van.

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The moment was caught on dramatic CCTV (Image: Plymouth Herald WS)

 

The Old Bailey heard the defendant carried out the anti-semitic attack on July 21, 2018 – a date that coincided with a Jewish fast day commemorating disasters, including the Holocaust.

The far-right extremist with “deep-rooted anti-Semitic beliefs” laughed after he set fire to a historic synagogue, the judge was told.

Superintendent Matt Lawler, the Local Policing Commander for Exeter, East & Mid Devon said it was ‘sheer chance’ nobody was worshiping in the building at the time.

“Morgan is clearly very unwell and following multiple detailed medical assessments it is clear that a hospital order is appropriate. He will be subject of further assessments and close monitoring for many years to come,” he said.

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Tristan Morgan, 51, pours petrol on the religious building

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The terrorist firebomber is blasted by flames in Devon

 

“The footage, which was played in open court, shows the level of planning, determination and intent by Morgan, whom the wider evidence clearly showed held abhorrent extreme right-wing, anti-Semitic, and white supremacist views. It is only by sheer chance that the synagogue was empty and indeed that Morgan himself sustained only minor burns.”

Following a joint investigation by local officers and Counter Terrorism Policing South West working with the special cases unit of the Crime Prosecution Service (CPS), Morgan was charged with collecting information and encouraging terrorism.

And Morgan, of no fixed abode, will be subject of long-term monitoring by the police and partners if he’s ever released.

0_Tristan-Morgan-court-case

Morgan, of no fixed abode, was given an indefinite hospital order

 

Alistair Richardson, prosecuting, said Morgan made songs “exhorting others to violence” against the Jewish community and had an array of material that “revelled in the degenerate views of Nazi Germany and white supremacists”.

He said: “He appeared to be laughing, while trying to flatten his hair, which she described as looking like it had been ‘whooshed up’.”

As he was put in a police van, Morgan said: “Please tell me that synagogue is burning to the ground, if not, it’s poor preparation.”

Later, as his burns were being treated in hospital, he told staff “it was like a bomb going off”.

The synagogue, built in 1763, is the third oldest in Britain and remains a focal point for the Jewish community in the south-west.

President of the Synagogue, Mr Richard Halsey said: “We sincerely thank the local police for their brilliant response and for their thorough investigation and support since the traumatic events of last year.

“In particular we wish to highlight how the community of Exeter has come together to demonstrate the genuine positivity in our city. We live in a wonderful place that has demonstrated tolerance and support for each other at times of need, and the whole Jewish community sincerely appreciates the support we have had from all faiths here in Exeter.

“In October we were thankfully able to return our services to the Synagogue, and in April this year we celebrated a wonderful re-dedication service.

“We are now back in our home, and it is as special as it has always been.”

 

The Ku Klux Klan founded:

The white supremacist group was founded on December 24th, 1865.

q1a8i6ufqnuxHillary Clinton Kissing her “mentor” KKK leader Robert Byrd

The war between the States ended in 1865 with the North victorious and the Confederate South defeated. Slavery in the South was now illegal, the former slaves had the vote and groups of white Republicans started collecting batches of them and escorting them to the polls. The situation was resented and small white terrorist groups formed at various places to keep the blacks down and white supremacy intact. Far the best known would be the Ku Klux Klan.

The Klan began in Tennessee, in the small town of Pulaski, near Memphis. It was founded by Confederate army veterans at a drinking club there and the strange but memorable name was a combination of ‘clan’ and the Greek word kuklos, meaning ‘circle’ or, in this case, social club. Dressed up in scary costumes with hoods and masks, members rode about at night threatening and frightening blacks. They demanded that blacks either vote Democrat or not vote at all. They met defiance with beatings, whippings and sometimes murder. They burned blacks’ houses down and drove black farmers off their land and they extended their hostilities to southern whites who opposed them and the so-called ‘carpetbaggers’, white infiltrators from the North.

The Klan loved weird titles, Grand Dragon and such, and a former Confederate cavalry general, Nathan Bedford Forrest, is said to have been for a time the Klan’s leader as Grand Imperial Wizard. In 1868 he said that the Klan had well over 500,000 members in the southern states, but that he was not involved.

The original Klan faded away in the 1870s after the federal government had taken action and many members had been arrested and punished, but it had helped to make the South a Democrat political stronghold. It was re-founded in 1915, inspired by the film The Birth of a Nation by the pioneering Hollywood director D.W. Griffith, which shone an admiring light on the original Klan. It has existed with very slowly declining influence ever since.

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BREAKING: KKK imperial wizard Frank Ancona is found dead in Missouri!

anconaFrank Ancona in his role as the imperial wizard of the Traditionalist Knights of the Ku Klux KlanFRANK ANCONA ON YOUTUBE.

 

Frank Ancona, the outspoken imperial wizard of the Traditionalist American Knights of the Ku Klux Klan, was found shot to death Saturday near Belgrade, Mo.

The body of the 51-year-old Leadwood, Mo., resident was discovered near the Big River by a family fishing in the area, according to Washington County Sheriff Zach Jacobsen in southeast Missouri.

Washington County coroner Brian DeClue told The Kansas City Star that Ancona died of a gunshot wound to the head.

“It was not self inflicted,” he said. “This is now a homicide investigation.”

The KKK group’s national headquarters is in Park Hills, Mo., about an hour’s drive southwest of St. Louis. Ancona shares a name with a car dealer in Olathe, but the two are not related or connected in any way.

Ancona’s KKK group is among the newest and most visible of the Klan factions in the country, although it’s not considered the largest. Founded around 2009, the Traditionalist American Knights have made headlines in recent years for such actions as distributing fliers during the Ferguson, Mo., protests warning that they were poised to use lethal force to protect themselves from demonstrators.

The group also regularly leaflets neighborhoods in cities around the country in an effort to recruit more members. And three of its members were charged in Florida in 2015 with plotting to kill a black man.

Jacobsen said authorities learned on Friday that Ancona had disappeared and that his car, a 2015 black Ford Fusion, had been located by a U.S. Forest Service employee on Forest Service property near Potosi. He said deputies secured the area and on Saturday he requested assistance from the Missouri Highway Patrol.

“During the investigation, one subject was arrested on an unrelated warrant and two search warrants were executed in Washington County,” Jacobsen said. “Subsequently, a body was discovered on the bank of the Big River near Belgrade, Mo., in southern Washington County … The body was identified as Mr. Ancona, and his family has been notified.”

Ancona had not been seen since Wednesday morning, authorities said. Leadwood Police Chief William Dickey told the Park Hills Daily Journal that police learned Ancona was missing when they were contacted by his employer. Ancona’s wife, Malissa, told police that her husband had received a call from work saying he needed to deliver a vehicle part across the state. But the employer told police that Ancona was not sent on a delivery run.

Dickey told the Daily Journal that a search of Ancona’s home found a safe that looked as though someone “had taken a crowbar to it.” Everything was missing from the safe, Dickey said, and Ancona’s firearms were missing from the house.

The police chief also said that he questioned Malissa Ancona about a Facebook post she’d made the day he disappeared. In the post, she said she was seeking a new roommate. Dickey said Malissa Ancona told him that when her husband left, he said he was filing for divorce when he got home, so she figured she would need a new roommate to help pay the bills.

Ancona’s son, also named Frank, posted on his Facebook page Friday that “no one has heard from him, no one has seen his car or seen him personally since February 8th.”

“His bank account hasn’t been used, his cellphone has been turned off goes straight to voicemail,” he wrote. “Time is ticking, the more time we wait, the stronger the bad possibilities become!”

News of Ancona’s death lit up social media late Saturday and early Sunday, with a barrage of comments from those expressing delight with his demise.

Ancona had posted recruiting videos and cross burnings on YouTube and was profiled in a domestic terrorism series published by The Star in 2015.

Those who monitor extremist groups say violence is nothing new among some white nationalist groups.

“Infighting is quite common,” said Devin Burghart, vice president of the Kansas City-based Institute for Research and Education on Human Rights. “Among the folks we’ve dealt with who are defectors, the internal fighting is one of the most common reasons why people decide to get out of the movement — because they fear for their lives.”

In December, an argument over the leadership of another KKK group appears to have led to the stabbing of an Indiana man who was attending a Loyal White Knights of the Ku Klux Klan “pro-Trump” parade in North Carolina.

One of the two men charged in connection with the stabbing is the group’s California state grand dragon. The other, Chris Barker, is the imperial wizard of the North Carolina-based group who has been engaged in a verbal battle with Ancona for years.

Burghart said it will be interesting to see what happens to Ancona’s KKK faction now that its leader is gone.

“Do they just go away — which would be awesome — or is there a second-in-command who’s going to step up and take his place, and if so, what direction does he want to take their faction?” he said. “Do they go the David Duke-ish mainstreamer route, or do they go the more hard-core route?”

In a series of interviews with The Star in 2014 and 2015, Ancona described his Klan as a Christian organization and a fraternal order.

“The only things secret about the Klan are that our rituals and ceremonies are only for members to see,” he said. “That’s part of the mystique of being a member.”

He said his Klan was not a hate group: “How can you be a Christian organization and hate other people?

“I’ve actually taken a lot of heat from other white nationalists because of that,” he said. “I’m called an N-lover and a Jew, blah, blah, blah. I’m doing everything I can to hold it to the principles it’s supposed to be by.”

But the group’s website is filled with race-based language, including this statement: “This Order will strive forever to maintain the God-given supremacy of the White Race.”

Ancona, a self-employed contractor, said his organization had members from every state except Alaska, Hawaii, Nevada and Utah. Missouri contributed many members, he said.

“Missouri’s always been a strong Klan state,” he said. “Kansas, not so much.”

Ancona was not popular with other KKK groups and was vocal in his criticism of them. He told The Star that there were few Klan organizations in the country that he considered legitimate and had been in squabbles with some of them.

Although Ancona claimed his Klan had thousands of members, actual figures are impossible to come by for such groups. Watchdog groups say the numbers are grossly overstated.

Burghart said while the Traditionalist American Knights was one of the more active Klans, distributing fliers in cities across the country on a regular basis, “I think they only had a few hundred members.”

“The Klan itself is nowhere near where it was in the ’80s and ’90s,” he said. “You’re looking at probably a couple thousand nationwide who still want to engage in that kind of stuff.”

Ancona said his organization did not condone violence. Those who do, he said, “are not following the Klan doctrine.”

But in 2015, authorities in Florida arrested three members of the Traditionalist American Knights on charges of conspiracy to commit murder. The suspects, current and former employees of the Florida Department of Corrections, allegedly plotted to kill a former inmate after his release from prison. The murder allegedly was to be in retaliation for a fight between the inmate, who is black, and one of the corrections employees.

According to an arrest affidavit, authorities were notified of the murder scheme by a confidential informant inside the Klan. The informant was present during discussions involving the three suspects.

Ancona’s Klan also drew media attention during the 2014 protests in Ferguson, Mo., when members distributed fliers as the city awaited a grand jury’s decision on whether to indict the officer who shot and killed an unarmed 18-year-old black man. The fliers warned that they would not tolerate violence by protesters and would use lethal force if necessary to defend themselves.

Critics said the Klan was trying to incite violence. Ancona told The Star that he was not inciting violence but letting those making terrorist threats know that they wouldn’t “sit back and let somebody throw a Molotov cocktail” at them.

On a video posted online, however, he used much harsher language.

“These people are acting like savage animals,” he said of protesters. “And that’s what they are, is a bunch of savage beasts.”

Ancona told The Star that members of the Traditionalist American Knights of the Ku Klux Klan would gather at his house for an annual Christmas party.

“And we had a cross lighting right in my backyard,” he said in 2015. “The police kept their eye on us, and people were driving by and taking pictures, but we didn’t have a single incident.”

Ancona said his group held cross lighting ceremonies a minimum of every three months.

“We’ve got property in four or five locations here in Missouri and a few in Tennessee and Virginia, Florida,” he told The Star.

He called the event a “Christian ceremony.”

“The cross is wrapped with a few layers of burlap that is soaked in what we call Klansmen’s cologne,” he said. “It’s basically a mixture of kerosene and diesel. .. It’s kind of a spiritual thing. It’s almost like a revival at a church. You kind of come away feeling on fire for Christ and you want to go out and spread the word.”

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DOCTOR AT NEW YORK CITY HOSPITAL SUSPENDED FOR ALLEGED WHITE SUPREMACY VIEWS AND AFFILIATIONS

Dov

A radiologist at a hospital in New York City is on suspension amid allegations that he is a white supremacist. The claims first surfaced in a now-deleted post on Medium shared by anti-fascists in New York.

The article accused Dr. Dov Bechhofer, 27, of being friends with white supremacist authors on social media, writing racist and xenophobic comments on the far-right website Counter-Currents, and running a Facebook page for a eugenics conference attended by neo-Nazis.

Bechhofer is a resident radiologist at the Montefiore Medical Center’s Moses Campus in the Bronx. He told The Gothamist he could not discuss the allegations. He did not reply to a request by Newsweek for comment.

“As soon as we learned of the Medium.com article, the employee was placed off duty pending the results of a thorough investigation,” a spokeswoman for Montefiore told Newsweek in an emailed statement.

“The views expressed in the article are in no way reflective of Montefiore, our mission, how we conduct ourselves, or the care we deliver each day.

“Montefiore was founded on our commitment to healthcare as a basic human right, and we deliver the highest level of care to everyone who comes through our doors, regardless of social or economic status, ethnicity, race or religion.

“Having all backgrounds, beliefs and diversity embodied in our patients, employees and neighbors is intrinsic to who we are, and allows us to thrive as an institution.”

Among the comments attributed to Bechhofer was: “Do I despise Blacks like [Colin] Kaepernick for milking the White cow despite the fact that he, his race, and all others are already in such objective debt to Whites? Absolutely.”

Another read: “The West has no use for [Muslims], and they’ll be just fine when they go home.”

He also allegedly called for armed militias on the southern border “with orders to shoot illegals.”

There are expressions of support for a white ethnostate: “I’ve written in previous comments that in White ethnostates (which I hope to see materialize ASAP)…Garden-variety ‘conservatives’ need to be made to understand that the age of racial neutrality is over.”

The author of the Medium article, whose identity is unknown, lays out how they connected Bechhofer to the comments made by a user called “Dov.” They draw on similarities between Bechhofer’s Facebook page and comments made by “Dov” about what he likes, who he associates with, and the work he does.

They also believe “Dov” is Jewish—as is Bechhofer, reportedly the son of a rabbi—despite making a number of anti-Semitic comments.

“I’ve had it in my head to write a little something called ‘A Jewish Defense of Anti-Semitism,’ but it’s been slipping my mind,” the user “Dov” once wrote.

“In short, the vocal majority of Jews act so irritatingly and display such reprehensible attitudes — publicly and privately — that I’d rather see a ‘tempered’ anti-Semitism now than see Jewish perfidy continue without consequence until, as Johnny Cash might say, the man comes around. Because he will.

“As I frequently tell Jewish acquaintances, if there is another Holocaust, it will be entirely of their doing (I don’t get too into the genesis of the first one… I once tried, but mouths fell open and I was practically kicked out of the apartment).”

Update:

An email address listed as belonging to Dov Bechhofer in the Medium post replied to a request for a statement, purporting to be from the doctor, sent to Newsweek at 11:16 a.m. on July 26. The statement is reproduced in full below:

“I am ashamed of the hurtful, unjustifiable words that I posted online that showed callous disregard toward certain minority groups and am deeply sorry for these transgressions.

“The posts do not reflect how I was raised or how I actually treat others. I will continue to struggle to understand what brought me to write them. In short, it started with scared curiosity about what was being said on these forums about Jews. But after spending some time in this toxic corner of the Internet, I eventually became numb to the ugliness of that hateful echo chamber and began participating in the dialogue.

“I am filled with remorse and take full responsibility for my actions, which will long be an embarrassment to my family, friends, colleagues, and community.

“Today, I’m at the beginning of a process to make amends for my behavior and am committed to working on my personal flaws. I am actively seeking long-term professional help to deal with these issues, which must be confronted honestly and completely.

“I denounce all forms of bigotry and violence directed at any ethnic, racial or religious group as well as those who are targeted for their sexual orientation.

“While I have much soul-searching and work to do on myself, I intend to take actions for the rest of my life that promote the dignity of all humanity.”

 

When UPS Delivered This Package To His Door, He Wanted To Show Everyone Why It Was Racist!

Sean Carter is a Harvard-educated attorney who currently practices law in Arizona. Despite this, he fears every day for his life and the lives of his family – solely because they are black. While many people would say racism is a thing of the past, the minorities of today are opening up about the racism of today. Carter decided to share his experience receiving a package that wasn’t intended for him as an example.

“This package has been sitting outside my house for days now. Why? Because we are black. And yes, I’ll explain,” the Phoenix resident wrote.

The package was apparently addressed to a family that lived just a few blocks down the street. Carter anticipated that people online would ask why he didn’t just bring the package himself, and that is the basis for his post.

“It’s extremely unsafe to send our boys to the home of any family that we don’t know in this predominantly white neighborhood. Why? Because there is a realistic chance that one of my neighbors will see my boy as a threat and call the police or even pull a gun,” he continued.

He recommends anyone that thinks he is exaggerating to google, “Brennan Walker.” Walker is a 14-year-old high school freshman who recently was shot at by a white man after he tried to ask her for directions.

The incident happened in early April after Walker slept in by accident and had to walk to school. He lost his way and approached the house. Walker knocked on the door and found a woman in hysterics. Security footage shows that she cried out to herself, “Why did these people choose my home?” This was just after he knocked on the door.

Jeffrey Ziegler has now been charged with assault with intent to murder and a felony firearm charge according to the local news reports. He could spend the rest of his life in prison after trying to kill this young man who simply tried knocking on a neighbor’s door for help.

“I feel terrible for the young man; I feel terrible for the mom and the anxiety that they had to go through,” Oakland County Sheriff Michael Bouchard said in an interview with WJBK in Michigan. “We are going to ask for every charge permissible for this guy who stepped up and fired a shotgun because someone knocked on his door.”

In his Facebook post, Carter makes a really good point. While some white Americans may think that racism is a thing of the past, the fact is these minorities are legitimately worried about their lives. To the point that they won’t even bring a package to a neighbor – and that is not okay.

“THAT is why the f-king package will be sitting on my porch until UPS retrieves it. Because I can’t trust that my white neighbors won’t see me, a Harvard-educated lawyer (or my 14 yo honor student son) as a roaming homicidal maniac. That’s what it’s like to be black in ‘post-racial’ America,” Carter wrote.

What do you think of his Facebook post?

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He said he punched a woman for calling him Nigger. A jury called it murder.

Robert Coleman, 27, was found guilty of second-degree murder Monday in Alexandria Circuit Court. (Alexandria Detention Center)

 

“We of course remain disappointed that they didn’t see it as manslaughter,” Coleman’s attorney, Robert Jenkins, said after the jury returned. He said Coleman and his family were “grateful” for the jury’s recommended sentence, given that second-degree murder can carry a punishment of up to 40 years. It reflected, Jenkins said, “that this was not something that he wanted to happen, that he did not intend to take someone’s life.”

A judge will formally sentence Coleman on May 24, but deviations from jury recommendations are rare. He is being held at the Alexandria Detention Center.

“In an all-too-often repeated theme, a tragedy unfolded because of a defendant’s inability to tolerate a perceived slight,” Commonwealth’s Attorney Bryan Porter said in a statement. “Verbal arguments should never devolve into physical altercations because physical altercations often bring devastating consequences.”

[Woman assaulted outside a convenience store in Alexandria dies]

Coleman and Montiel-Benitez were strangers. Coleman was buying cigarettes. Montiel-Benitez was buying alcohol at the convenience store near the Mark Center on Seminary Road.

The source of the animosity between them remains a mystery. Surveillance video shows they engaged in a brief conversation, but there is no audio. Coleman’s girlfriend, Nikki Howard, testified she could not hear the entire conversation but broke the two up. In the video, Montiel-Benitez is seen walking to Coleman says that is when she called him the n-word; Howard remembered her cursing. In the video Coleman can be seen chasing Montiel-Benitez outside.

 

Through the leaves of a tree, another camera captures the punch that put Montiel-Benitez in a coma from which she did not recover.

Coleman fled the scene and was picked up the next day when a detective recognized him in the surveillance video. He at first denied involvement in what he thought was simply an assault. When he was told Montiel-Benitez was in critical condition, he admitted hitting her, but said he had not meant to cause serious harm.

He also thought the heavyset woman with short hair was a man, he told detectives.

Lord argued the focus on Montiel-Benitez’s appearance at trial, as well as the high level of alcohol in her system, was disrespectful to the dead.the door and then turning.

“She deserves to be treated with more humanity,” he told the jury.

He said Coleman was “a bully who was looking for a fight” and picked on Montiel-Benitez, who was just trying to get away.

Jenkins told jurors Montiel-Benitez’s .351 blood alcohol level and size might help explain why Coleman believed “this was going to be mutual combat, and he struck first.”

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African-Americans Are A Big Threat To American Society – And Here’s Why!

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