Virginia Teen Dies After Summoning Ancient Haitian Voodoo God Papa Legba

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The recent death of a Virginia teen has been blamed on her practicing Haitian Voodoo spells to summon the deity known as “Papa Legba.” 19-year-old Katelyn “Kat” Restin was found dead after she allegedly drowned in a bathtub, according to posts on social media from her friends.

Restin’s unexpected death came just two days after she claimed to have seen Papa Legba apparently after a summoning spell people warned her not to try.

Papa Legba is a “loa,” which are spirits of Haitian Vodou and Louisiana Voodoo.

Legba represents a West African and Caribbean Voodoo god and has many different names depending on the region in which he’s worshipped, though he’s most commonly known in Haiti as Papa Legba.

According to a description of Papa Legba from Wikipedia, Legba “stands at a spiritual crossroads and gives (or denies) permission to speak with the spirits of Guinee, and is believed to speak all human languages.”

Papa Legba was famously depicted in 2013’s American Horror Story: Coven (Season 3) as a crossroads demon and the character was portrayed by Lance Reddick. The character briefly returned in 2018’s American Horror Story: Apocalypse(Season 8).

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Katelyn was a part of a group on social media that practices spells, and one day she decided to get into “voodoo.”

When people warned her not to play around with that stuff, she clapped back on Twitter, saying that there’s nothing wrong with trying something new.

“Let people live and have their own religion,” she wrote in a post dated March 29th. “If someone is into something different accept that. Stop saying ‘no you come from God.’ I’m Wiccan and I always will be so shut the f**k up and let me be.”

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Three weeks later, Kat posted on April 17th that she’d seen Papa Legba and was “scared.” Two days later, she “passed away unexpectedly in her mother’s home,” according to her obituary, which also notes that she “was a proud new mom and adored her baby, Aaliyah.”

Kat’s obituary continues: “She was always the bright spirit of any gathering, and her resilience to keep going in challenging times inspired many of her family and friends. Katelyn always will be so deeply loved and very missed by all.”

Posts on social media suggest that Katelyn’s death was supposedly caused by drowning after she had a panic attack in a bathtub.

Someone from the Facebook group she was a part of said they “did a reading on her,” and it wasn’t Papa Legba she saw … it was actually another Haitian Vodou spirit named “Baron,” who is referred to as “the master of the dead.”

Katelyn’s family has set up a GoFundMe to establish a trust for her five-month-old daughter Aaliyah.

“She leaves behind a beautiful daughter…Aaliyah, whom she loved more than anyone or anything. ‘I never thought I could ever love anyone as much as I love her,’ Katelyn would say following her birth.

“She didn’t expect or plan on leaving her so soon in her young life. Aaliyah is only 5 months old,” the page reads.

“Katelyn was blessed with a loving family and many supportive friends. Many have asked how they can help, and they want to be there for Aaliyah.

“Therefore, in honor of Katelyn (and the love she had for her daughter), this GoFundMe account is set up to establish a trust fund for Aaliyah, to assist financially in the next phase of her life without her beloved mother. Katelyn was a single mother, with a limited income, so your donations will help to give Aaliyah a better start in her life.”

Study: A Voodoo Doll Of The Boss Will Make Your Employees Happier!?

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Allowing disgruntled staff to stab voodoo dolls of their boss could help them feel less resentful and improve the quality of their work, a new study has suggested.

According to the Health and Safety Executive, more than 12 million Britons are forced to take time off work each year because of stress and anxiety, often caused by pressure from overbearing or abusive managers.

But rather than allowing staff to brood over their mistreatment, which can be detrimental to work, business experts have suggested they should be allowed to take out their anger on voodoo dolls.

A study of 229 workers in the US and Canada found that engaging in ‘symbolic retaliation’ lowered feelings of injustice by one third.

Although revenge is often viewed negatively, the researchers say the findings highlight ‘the largely overlooked benefit of retaliation from the victim’s perspective.’

Assistant Professor Dr Lindie Liang, of Lazaridis School of Business and Economics at Wilfrid Laurier University in Ontario Canada said voodoo dolls could help staff

“As weird as it sounds, yes,” she said  “We found a simple and harmless symbolic act of retaliation can make people feel like they’re getting even and restoring their sense of fairness.

“It may not have to be a voodoo doll per se: theoretically anything that serves as a symbolic act of retaliation, like throwing darts at a picture of your boss, might work.

Symbolically retaliating against an abusive boss can benefit employees psychologically by allowing them to restore their sense of justice in the workplace.”

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The participants in the study used an online voodoo doll programme created by Dumb.com, which allows users to name the effigy after their boss, and sticking it with pins, burn it with a candle, and pinch it with pliers.

Although voodoo dolls are often linked to Africa and the Americas in popular fiction, early records suggest they have their origins in the British medieval period, when people would make rag dolls or sculptures of witches – called poppetts – and pierce them with pins to inflict harm or break an enchantment.

The dolls were later mistakenly linked with Afro-Caribbean Voodoo or Vodou.

The report authors decided to embark on the study because previous research suggested that people who feel they have been treated unfairly will lash out at their abuser, but it can spark a spiral of retaliation and counter-retaliation which is detrimental in the long term.

“We wanted to see, rather than actually retaliating against the abusive boss, whether mistreated employees could benefit from harmless acts of symbolic retaliation,” added Dr Liang.

For the study, the participants were asked to recall and visualise a workplace interaction which had involved abuse from a supervisor. Some were then asked to retaliate using a voodoo doll, before all completed a task to fill in the blanks to complete words.

Those who had been allowed to stick pins in their virtual boss were far less likely to still feel bitter, and were also better at completing the word exercise.

In a paper in the journal The Leadership Quarterly, the authors conclude: “These findings suggest that retaliation not only benefits individual victims, but may also benefit the organization as a whole, given that justice perceptions is important for employee performance and well-being.”

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