The Democrat Plantation, Then and Now

Hillary Clinton revealed her racism once again when she recently joked, “I know, they all look like,” to a questioner who asked about Eric Holder and Cory Booker.

If a Republican had made that same retort, there would be apologies gushing out six ways toward Sunday, but Hillary always gets away with everything because the Deep State fake news media remains on her side. She also once referred to blacks as ‘super predators.’ Secret service agents have alluded to racist remarks made by the Clintons.
African American employment is rising under President Trump. Many blacks are fed up with the Democrat Plantation. More and more are starting see socialism and ‘free stuff’ as a means to enslave. In short, many are waking up just in time for the upcoming election. 
Someone should tell Hillary that not all blacks look alike. Nor do they all think alike. 

—Ben Garrison

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“Paper Trained?”

New Ben Garrison Cartoon, “Paper Trained?”

Sarah Jeong now works at The New York Times as a member of its editorial board.

 

The hiring occurred despite Jeong’s string of blatantly racist tweets attacking white people.

 

Roseanne Barr made an offensive joke and was promptly fired from her TV show. Jeong posted far worse and she did it repeatedly—yet she was hired. This is leftist hypocrisy at its most blatant. If Jeong had been talking about any other race other than ‘white,’ she wouldn’t have been let into the New York Times building. Alas, white people are considered legitimate targets among leftist bigots, including self-hating whites.

 

If the Left didn’t have double standards, they would have no standards at all!

 

Red Wave in 2018!

White supremacist gangs growing in NC, officials say

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— Gang activity overall is on the rise in North Carolina, and the sharpest increase is among white supremacist groups, law enforcement officials said Friday.

The major gangs operating in North Carolina are still the Bloods, the Crips and the Gangsters, or Folk Nation, but Tony Taylor, who heads the Special Operations and Intelligence Section of the state Department of Public Safety, said the rise in white supremacy groups is a new development.

“We’re not sure what’s causing it. It’s just a trend we’re starting to see, and we’re trying to figure that out,” Taylor told members of the state Emergency Response Commission. “We don’t know what’s causing it other than this one group that seems to be standing out right now – Bound for Glory.”

Russell Jackson, a DPS intelligence agent, said national groups like the Ku Klux Klan and Aryan Pride also are expanding across the state, including inside the prison system.

“Not only are we seeing them increasing in numbers, but we’re seeing them increasing in violence and violent behavior,” Jackson said.

Law enforcement agencies in other states also have reported similar growth. Organizations that track hate groups have noted increased activity in such groups, even though many social media sites made an effort to block white supremacist groups in the wake of a fatal clash in Charlottesville, Va., last year.

Many white supremacy groups engage in the same criminal enterprises as other gangs, Taylor said, and some gangs have even developed their own dark web apps to communicate out of sight of law enforcement. But he said recruiting is still mostly done via social media or in person.

“Usually, you can see it,” Taylor said. “You see your kid hanging out with people you just know they should not be hanging out with. You start seeing some of the social media stuff that doesn’t look quite right. That’s something I would encourage all parents to do – pay attention to that, because that’s where we get a lot of information from.”1

Law enforcement agencies in most of North Carolina’s 100 counties say overall gang membership is either increasing or holding steady, officials said.

Racist White Woman Doesn’t Want Black Men in Her Neighborhood!

James Ochoa made a U-turn on a street in a suburban neighborhood in Nevada. A white woman by the name of Summer Berlinger demanded to know why he was on her street, began yelling “Help! Gun!” at the top of her lungs (James was unarmed). Apparently, Summer Berlinger was attempting to trick one of her neighbors into shooting an unarmed man, James Ochoa!

SEE VIDEO HERE:

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When UPS Delivered This Package To His Door, He Wanted To Show Everyone Why It Was Racist!

Sean Carter is a Harvard-educated attorney who currently practices law in Arizona. Despite this, he fears every day for his life and the lives of his family – solely because they are black. While many people would say racism is a thing of the past, the minorities of today are opening up about the racism of today. Carter decided to share his experience receiving a package that wasn’t intended for him as an example.

“This package has been sitting outside my house for days now. Why? Because we are black. And yes, I’ll explain,” the Phoenix resident wrote.

The package was apparently addressed to a family that lived just a few blocks down the street. Carter anticipated that people online would ask why he didn’t just bring the package himself, and that is the basis for his post.

“It’s extremely unsafe to send our boys to the home of any family that we don’t know in this predominantly white neighborhood. Why? Because there is a realistic chance that one of my neighbors will see my boy as a threat and call the police or even pull a gun,” he continued.

He recommends anyone that thinks he is exaggerating to google, “Brennan Walker.” Walker is a 14-year-old high school freshman who recently was shot at by a white man after he tried to ask her for directions.

The incident happened in early April after Walker slept in by accident and had to walk to school. He lost his way and approached the house. Walker knocked on the door and found a woman in hysterics. Security footage shows that she cried out to herself, “Why did these people choose my home?” This was just after he knocked on the door.

Jeffrey Ziegler has now been charged with assault with intent to murder and a felony firearm charge according to the local news reports. He could spend the rest of his life in prison after trying to kill this young man who simply tried knocking on a neighbor’s door for help.

“I feel terrible for the young man; I feel terrible for the mom and the anxiety that they had to go through,” Oakland County Sheriff Michael Bouchard said in an interview with WJBK in Michigan. “We are going to ask for every charge permissible for this guy who stepped up and fired a shotgun because someone knocked on his door.”

In his Facebook post, Carter makes a really good point. While some white Americans may think that racism is a thing of the past, the fact is these minorities are legitimately worried about their lives. To the point that they won’t even bring a package to a neighbor – and that is not okay.

“THAT is why the f-king package will be sitting on my porch until UPS retrieves it. Because I can’t trust that my white neighbors won’t see me, a Harvard-educated lawyer (or my 14 yo honor student son) as a roaming homicidal maniac. That’s what it’s like to be black in ‘post-racial’ America,” Carter wrote.

What do you think of his Facebook post?

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See It To Believe It: Maxine Waters Melts Down Saying, “I Resent Make America Great Again”

Alex Jones presents video footage of Maxine Waters on the floor of the House as she shouts down a Republican representative who was asking members to consider the positive benefits of MAGA.

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List of ethnic slurs by ethnicity

This list of ethnic slurs compiles words that are, or have been, used ethnic slurs sorted by ethnicity. For the purposes of this list, ethnicity can be defined by either race, nationality or ethnicity.

Abo/Abbo
(AUS) Australian Aboriginal person. Originally, this was simply an informal term for Aborigine, and was in fact used by Aboriginal people themselves until it started to be considered offensive in the 1950s. In remoter areas, Aboriginal people still often refer to themselves (quite neutrally) as Blackfellas (and whites as Whitefellas). Although Abo is still considered quite offensive by many, the pejorative boong is now more commonly used when the intent is deliberately to offend, as that word’s status as an insult is unequivocal.[1]
Boong / bong / bung
(Aus) Australian aboriginal.[2] Boong, pronounced with ʊ (like the vowel in bull), is related to the Australian English slang word bung, meaning dead; infected; or dysfunctional. From bung, to go bung “Originally to die, then to break down, go bankrupt, cease to function [Ab. bong dead]”.[3] Highly offensive. [First used in 1847 by JD Lang, Cooksland, 430][4] The (Oxford) Australian National Dictionary gives its origin in the Wemba word for “man” or “human being”.[5]
Coon
an Aboriginal person.[6]
Gin
an Aboriginal woman.[7]
Lubra
an Aboriginal woman.[8] An Aboriginal word,[5]

Af 
(Rhodesia) African to a white Rhodesian (Rhodie).[9]
Ape 
(U.S.) a black person.[10]
Béni-oui-oui
Mostly used during the French colonization of Algeria as a derogatory term to describe Algerian Muslims.[11]
Bluegum 
An offensive slur used by some United States white Southerners for an African-American perceived as being lazy and who refuses to work.[12]
Boogie 
a black person (film noire) “The boogies lowered the boom on Beaver Canal”.[13]
Buck 
a black person, also used to describe Native Americans.
Buffie 
a black person.[14]
Burrhead / Burr-head / Burr head 
(U.S.) a black person (referencing stereotypical hair type).[15]
Colored 
(U.S.) a Black person. Once generally accepted as inoffensive, this word is now considered disrespectful by some. The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People continues to use its full name unapologetically. Some black Americans have reclaimed this word and softened it in the expression “a person of color”.
Coon 
(U.S. & U.K) a black person. Possibly from Portuguese barracoos, a building constructed to hold slaves for sale. (1837).[16]
Crow 
a black person,[17] spec. a black woman.
Eggplant 
(U.S.) A black person. Notable for appearing in the 1979 film, The Jerk.[18]
Fuzzies 
(U.K.) A black person. In the 1964 film classic, “Zulu”, the British officer played by Michael Caine refers to the Zulus as “fuzzies”.[19]
Gable 
a black person.[14]
Golliwogg 
(UK Commonwealth) a dark-skinned person, after Florence Kate Upton‘s children’s book character [20]
Jigaboo, jiggabo, jijjiboo, zigabo, jig, jigg, jiggy, jigga 
(U.S. & UK) a black person (JB) with stereotypical black features (dark skin, wide nose, etc.) Used to refer to mannerisms that resemble dancing.
Jim Crow 
(U.S.) a black person; also the name for the segregation laws prevalent in much of the United States until the civil rights movement of the 1950s and 1960s.[21]
Jim Fish 
(South Africa) a black person[22]
Jungle bunny
(US and UK) a black person.[23]
Kaffir, kaffer, kaffir, kafir, kaffre 
(South Africa) a. a black person. Considered very offensive.
Macaca, same as “macaque” 
a person of black African descent, originally used in languages of colonial powers in Africa[24]
Mammy 
Domestic servant of black African descent, generally good-natured, often overweight, and loud.[25]
Monkey
a person of black African descent.[24] See also Macaca (slur). It also gave rise to the racist “monkey chants” in sports.
Mosshead 
a black person.[14]
Munt 
(among whites in South Africa, Zimbabwe, and Zambia) a black person from muntu, the singular of Bantu[26]
Nig-nog 
(UK & U.S.) a black person.[27]
Nigger / nigra / nigga / niggah / nigguh
(U.S., UK) An offensive term for a black person. From the word negro which means the color black in numerous languages. Diminutive appellations include “Nigg” and “Nigz”. Over time, the terms “Nigga” and “Niggaz” (plural).
Niglet / nigglet 
a black child
Nigra / negra / niggra / nigrah / nigruh 
(U.S.) offensive for a black person [first used in the early 1900s][28]
Pickaninny 
a term – generally considered derogatory – that in English usage refers to black children, or a caricature of them which is widely considered racist.
Porch monkey 
a black person,[29]
Powder burn 
a black person.[14]
Quashie 
a black person.[14]
Sambo 
(U.S.) a derogatory term for an African American, Black, or sometimes a South Asian person.[25][30]
Smoked Irish / smoked Irishman 
(U.S.) 19th century term for Blacks (intended to insult both Blacks and Irish).[14]
Sooty 
a black person [originated in the U.S. in the 1950s][31]
Spade 
A black person.[32] recorded since 1928 (OED), from the playing cards suit.
Spook 
a black person.
Tar baby
(UK; U.S.; and N.Z.) a black child.[33]
Teapot 
(British) a black person. [1800s][34]
Thicklips 
a black person.[14]

Celestial 
(Aust.) Chinese people, used in the late 1900s, a reference to their coming from the “Celestial Empire” (i.e. China).
Charlie 
(U.S.) A term used by American troops during the Vietnam War as a shorthand term for communist guerrillas: it was shortened from “Victor Charlie”, the radio code designation for Viet Cong, or VC.[35]
Chinaman 
(U.S. and English) Chinese person, used in old American west when discrimination against Chinese was common.[36] Possibly coined by early Chinese Americans from a translation of “Zhong Guo Ren” which is literally “China” and “Person”. In contrast to “Frenchman” or “Irishman” which are generally considered neutral, non-insulting terms, “Chinaman” is considered offensive especially in the U.S. due to the virulent anti-Asian racism of the period in which the term came into popular usage (mid-1800s) and tends to generate objections in contemporary usage. Can be comparable to referring to a Black person as “a Negro”, today. In 20th century Chicagopolitics, “Chinaman” had a specific, unintentionally insulting meaning. A junior politician or government worker’s political patron was referred to as their “Chinaman” (or “chinaman” without the initial capital) regardless of their actual ethnic heritage or gender.[37] The term “chinaman”, without the initial capital, is also regularly used in cricket in a non-ethnic sense to refer to a left-handed bowler who uses a wrist spin action.
Chink 
(U.S.) a derogatory term used towards people of perceived Chinese descent. Until the 1980s a U.S. school used the term as a sports mascot.[38]
Gook
a derogatory term for East Asians, particularly Filipinos, Japanese, Koreans, and Vietnamese, used especially for enemy soldiers.[39][40] Its use as an ethnic slur towards Koreans has been traced to U.S. Marines serving in the Philippines in the early 20th century.[40] The earliest recorded use is dated 1920.[41] Widely popularized by the Korean war and Vietnam War (1965–73).
Jap 
(Predominantly U.S.) Offensive. Shortened from the word “Japanese“, often used pejoratively.
Nip 
Offensive word for a Japanese person. From “Nippon”, first used in World War II.[42]
Oriental 
(Predominantly U.S., used elsewhere) Refers to an East Asian person (of the Orient) and/or their ethnicity; sometimes considered offensive.[43][44][45] In 2016, US President Barack Obama signed a bill to remove the term “Oriental”, together with some others, as a reference to a person from federal laws.[46]
Yellow, Yellowman, or Yellowwoman
designating or pertaining to an East Asian person, in reference to those who have a yellowish skin complexion.[47]

American-Born Confused Desi, or ABCD
(Asian Indians in U.S.): used for American-born South Asians including Indian/ Pakistani/ Bangladeshi (mainly Indians as Indians are the largest number of “South Asians”) who are confused about their cultural identity. This is often used humorously without any derogatory meaning.
Chee-chee 
a Eurasian half-caste, probably from Hindi chi-chi fie!, literally, dirt.[48]
Paki 
people of Pakistan descent.
Curry Muncher 
used in Australia, Africa, New Zealand, and North America, it is a person of Asian Indian origin.[49]
Hajji, Hadji, Haji 
Used to refer to Iraqis, Arabs, Afghans, or Middle Eastern and South Asian people in general. Derived from the honorific Al-Hajji, the title given to a Muslim who has completed the Hajj (pilgrimage to Mecca)
Malaun 
Term for Hindus used in Bangladesh.
Brownie 
Someone of Hispanic, Indian, and Arab, rarely used as someone of Native American or Pacific Island descent.[50]

Brownie 
Someone of Hispanic, Indian, and Arab, rarely used as someone of Native American or Pacific Island descent.[50]
Camel jockey
an Arab.
Sand nigger 
person who dwells in deserts of Saudi Arabia or African continent.
Towelhead / Raghead
A Muslim, Arab, Sikh, or member of any group that traditionally wears headdress such as a turban, keffiyeh or headscarf.

Spic, spick, spik, spig, or spigotty 
A person of Hispanic descent. First recorded use in 1915. Theories include from “no spik English” (and spiggoty from the Chicano no speak-o t’e English), but common belief is that it is an abbreviation of “Hispanic”. Also used for someone who speaks the Spanish language. In the early 20th century, “spic”, “spig”, and “spigotty” was also used as a slur against Italian people and Portuguese people.[51]
Brownie 
Someone of Hispanic, Indian, and Arab, rarely used as someone of Native American or Pacific Island descent.[50]
Wetback 
A Latino person. Originally applied specifically to Mexican migrant workers who had crossed the Rio Grande border river illegally to find work in the United States, its meaning has since broadened.
Greaseball
(U.S.) Can be used to describe a person of Italian or Hispanic descent.[52] More generally, it can also refer to anyone of Mediterranean or Latin American descent.[53]
Beaner 
Term for Mexican, but can be used for Hispanics in general because of the idea that all Hispanics are the same.
Greaser
(U.S.) Can be used to describe a person of Italian or Hispanic descent. Can also be used to describe members of the 1950-1960s subculture which Italian Americans, and, to a lesser extent, Hispanics were stereotyped to be a part of.
Tacohead
a Mexican person. This phrase is uttered by Willem Dafoe‘s character (Charlie) in the film Born on the Fourth of July.[54]

Bule 
(Indonesia) White people; literally, “albino”, but used in the same way that “colored” might be used to refer to a black person to mean any white person.[55]
Charlie 
Mildly derogatory term used by African Americans, mainly in the 1960s and 1970s, to refer to a white person (from James Baldwin’s play, Blues For Mister Charlie).[56]
Coonass or coon-ass 
(U.S.) a Cajun; may be derived from the French conasse. May be used among Cajuns themselves. Not considered to be derogatory in most circumstances.
Cracker 
(U.S.) Derogatory term for whites, particularly from the American South.[57]
Gringo 
(The Americas) Non-Hispanic U.S. national. Hence Gringolandia, the United States; not always a pejorative term, unless used with intent to offend.[58]
Gubba 
(AUS) Aboriginal (Koori) term for white people[59] – derived from Governor / Gubbanah
Gweilo, gwailo, or kwai lo (鬼佬) 
(Hong Kong and South China) A White man. Gwei means “ghost”. The color white is associated with ghosts in China. A lo is a regular guy (i.e. a fellow, a chap, or a bloke). Once a mark of xenophobia, the word was promoted by Maoists and is now in general, informal use.[60]
Honky (U.S.) 
Offensive term for a white person.
Haole (Hawaii) 
Usually not offensive, can be derogatory if intended to offend. Used by modern-day Native Hawaiians to refer to anyone of European descent whether native born or not. Use has spread to many other islands of the Pacific and is known in modern pop culture.[61]
Hunky, Bohunk
(U.S.) A central Central European laborer. It originated in the coal regions of Pennsylvania and West Virginia, where Poles and other immigrants from Central Europe (Hungarians (Magyar), Rusyns, Slovaks) came to perform hard manual labor on the mines.[62]
Mangia cake / cake (Canada)
A derogatory term used by Italian Canadians to disdainfully describe those of Anglo-Saxon descent (from Italian, literally ‘cake eater’). One suggestion is that this term originated from the perception of Italian immigrants that Canadian bread is sweet as cake in comparison to the rustic bread eaten by Italians.[63]
Medigan / Amedigan (U.S.)
Similar to “mangia cake”. A term used by Italian Americans to refer to Americans of White Anglo Saxon Protestant descent, Americans with no discernible ethnicity, or non-Italian Americans in general. Comes from Southern Italian pronunciation of the Italian word “americano”.[64][self-published source][65][66][67][68][69]
Ofay 
(U.S.) a white person, unknown etymology.[15][70]
Arkie
A person from the State of Arkansas, used during the great depression to describe farmers from Arkansas looking for work else where.
Okie
A person from the State of Oklahoma, used during the great depression to describe farmers from Oklahoma looking for work else where.
Peckerwood 
(U.S.) a white person (southerner). This word was coined in the 19th century by Southern blacks to describe poor whites.[71]
Whitey (U.S.) 
Offensive term for a white person.

Chocko
(Aus) a person of Mediterranean, Southern European, or Middle Eastern descent.[72][73]
Dago
In the U.S., refers specifically to Italians. In UK and Commonwealth, may refer to Italians, Spaniards, Portuguese, and potentially Greek peoples, possibly derived from the Spanish name “Diego”.
Greaseball, Greaser
In the U.S. especially, “greaseball” generally refers to a person of Italian descent, while “greaser”, though it may be used as a shortening of “greaseball” to refer to Italians, has been more often applied to Hispanic Americans or Mexican Americans. However, “greaseball” and, to a lesser extent, “greaser”, can also refer to any person of Mediterranean/Southern European descent or Hispanic descent, including Greeks, Spaniards, and the Portuguese, as well as Latin Americans.[74][53]
Kanake
(Ger) Used in 1960s Germany to refer to Southern European and Mediterranean immigrants, increasingly used exclusively for Turkish people.
Métèque
(Fr) Mediterranean or Middle Eastern immigrant, especially Italians.[75]
Wog
(Aus) Australian slur for the first wave of Southern European immigrants and their descendants that contrasted with the dominant Anglo-Saxon/Anglo-Celtic colonial stock. Used mostly for Mediterraneans and Southern Europeans, including the Spanish, Italians, Greeks, Macedonians, Lebanese, Arabs, Croatians and Serbians.

Timber Nigger 
a Native American person, term used by whites in the U.S.[76]
Redskin 
a Native American person, originated by Natives to describe themselves as different from the “white man” and sometimes used now as an offensive term[77]
(Red) Indian 
only considered offensive by few, termed by Columbus due to the fact he thought he arrived in India, and met their natives and their reddish skin tone.[citation needed]
Prairie/Grass Nigger 
used to describe Native Americans in the Great Plains.[78]
Injun 
a corrupted version of the word “Indian”.
Brownie 
A brown-skinned person, or someone of Asian, or Aboriginal Australian, or Japanese descent.[50]
Chug
(Canada) refers to an individual of aboriginal descent.[79] See Chugach for the native people.
Squaw
(US and CAN) a female Native American.[80] Derived from lower East Coast Algonquian (Massachuset: ussqua),[81] which originally meant “young woman”, but which took on strong negative connotations in the late 20th century.

Boonga / boong / bunga / boonie
(New Zealand) a Pacific Islander [alteration of boong].[82]
Brownie 
Someone of Hispanic, Indian, and Arab, rarely used as someone of Native American or Pacific Island descent.[50]
Hori
(New Zealand), an offensive term for a Māori (from the formerly common Maorified version of the English name George).[83]

Merkin
Internet slang for inhabitant of the United States of America.[84]
Yankee and Yank
First applied by the Dutch colonists of New Amsterdam to Connecticuters and other residents of New England, possibly from Dutch Janke (“Johnny”) or from Jan Kees(“John Cheese”).[85] Uncontracted, “Yankee” remains in use in the American South in reference to Northerners; contracted, “Yank” is employed internationally by speakers of British English in informal reference to all Americans (first recorded 1778[85]).
Seppo and Septic
From Cockney rhyming slang, using the unrhymed word of “septic tank” in reference to “Yank” above.

Yankee and Yank
First applied by the Dutch colonists of New Amsterdam to Connecticuters and other residents of New England, possibly from Dutch Janke (“Johnny”) or from Jan Kees(“John Cheese”).[85] Uncontracted, “Yankee” remains in use in the American South in reference to Northerners; contracted, “Yank” is employed internationally by speakers of British English in informal reference to all Americans (first recorded 1778[85]).

Cracker 
Derogatory term for whites, particularly from the American South.[57]
Redneck
Usually an insult to rural people or Southerners.
Hillbilly
Usually used to describe rural people or Southerners. It originated as a term for farmers living in The Appalachian Mountains.
Honky also spelled “honkey” or “honkie”
(U.S., NZ) a white person. Derived from an African American pronunciation of “hunky“, the disparaging term for a Hungarian laborer. The first record of its use as an insulting term for a white person dates from the 1950s.[86] In New Zealand honky is used by Māori to describe New Zealanders of European descent.[87]
White Trash
Originally an insult for poor white Southerners.
Trailer Trash
An insult to describe a mainly white population stereotyped to live in trailer parks.
Hick
An insult to describe poor white people.
Bumpkin, Country Bumpkin, and Hillbilly Bumpkin
An insult to describe poor rural white people mainly those who share a rural or southern lifestyle.
Good ol’ boy
A term used to describe Southerners, especially white, powerful people and their networks.
Peckerwood
In the 1940s, the abbreviated version “wood” entered California prison slang, originally meaning an Okie mainly from the San Joaquin Valley. This has caused the symbol of the woodpecker to be used by white power skinheads and other pro-white groups. It is used as a slur against southerners today.
Whitey
a term for a Caucasian.[88]

Limey
A predominantly North American slang nickname for Britons, especially those from England.
Pom, Pommy
In Australia, South Africa and New Zealand usually denotes an English person.

Boches
Apheresis of the word alboche, which in turn is a blend of allemand (French for German) and caboche (slang for head). Used mainly during the First and Second World Wars, and directed especially at German soldiers.[89]
Chleuh
From the name of the Chleuh, a North African ethnicity — a term with racial connotations. It also denotes the absence of words beginning in Schl- in French. It was used mainly in World War II, but is also used now in a less offensive way.
Hermans, Herms
Based on the common German name Hermann, pronounced to rhyme with “German”[90]
The Hun, The Huns
Initially seen on Allied war propaganda during World War I. An allusion to the legendary savagery of Attila the Hun, referenced by Kaiser Wilhelm II in a speech given in 1900, exhorting his troops to be similarly brutal and relentless in suppressing the Boxer Rebellion in China.
Jerry, Gerry
Rhyming slang (Jerry the German), primarily used in the first and second World Wars by the British, but also other English speakers. Based on the common given nickname Jerry, short for Jeremiah, Gerald, and other similar-sounding names.
Kraut
Since World War II, Kraut has, in the English language, come to be used as a derogatory term for a German. This is probably based on sauerkraut, which is popular in various South-German cuisines but traditionally not prepared in North Germany.
Marmeladinger
The term Marmeladinger (from Southern German/Austrian “Marmelade” = jam [cook.]) has its origin in the trenches of World War I. While Austrian infantry rations included butter and lard as spread German troops had to make do with cheaper “Marmelade” as ersatz which they disdainfully called “Heldenbutter” (Hero’s butter) or “Hindenburgfett”.[91]
Mof
In Dutch the most common term for the German people, after the regular/official one, is “mof”. It is regarded as a derogatory term, used exclusively for Germans and reflected Dutch resentment of the German occupation of the Netherlands during the Second World War.[92]
Piefke
The Austrian ethnic slur for a German is Piefke. Like its Bavarian counterpart Saupreiß (literally: sow-Prussian) the term Piefke historically characterized the people of Prussia only. It is derived from the name of Prussian military composer and band-leader Johann Gottfried Piefke.[93]

Bog-trotter’ or Bog Irish
Derogatory term for the Irish derived from Irish practice of peat farming.[94]
Mick
Derogatory term for an Irishman in the U.S. and U.K. Like Mickey, Mike, and Mikey, Mick is a common abbreviation or nickname for Michael (in English) or Mícheál (its equivalent in Irish), which are common names for Irish males (such as Mick McCarthy).[95][96]
Paddy
Derogatory term for an Irish man, derived from a nickname for Pádraig, a common Irish name for males after St. Patrick, the patron saint of Ireland. The term is not always intended to be derogatory – for instance, it was used by Taoiseach-in-waiting Enda Kenny in February 2011.[97]
Prod
Abbreviation for ‘Protestant’, especially Northern Ireland Protestants, often used alongside ‘Taig’, in expressions such as ‘both Taigs and Prods’; like other such abbreviations everywhere, it is often used for convenience, or as a friendly nickname, or as self-description, usually without any offense being intended, and usually without any offense being taken.
Taig
derived from the Irish Gaelic forename Tadhg, often used to describe Catholics in Northern Ireland. It often has implications of Republican sympathy. It is often used alongside ‘Prod’, in expressions such as ‘both Taigs and Prods’.
Snout
Offensive term used in Northern Ireland to describe Protestants of British descent living in Northern Ireland.[98]

Dago
(U.S.) A person of Italian descent.
Ginzo
(U.S.) an Italian-American.[99]
Goombah
An Italian male, especially an Italian thug or mafioso.
Greaseball
(U.S.) Can be used to describe a person of Italian or Hispanic descent.[52]
Greaser
(U.S.) Can be used to describe a person of Italian or Hispanic descent. Can also be used to describe members of the 1950s subculture which Italians were stereotyped to be a part of.
Guido
(US) An Italian-American male. Usually offensive. Derives from the Italian given name, Guido. Used mostly in the Northeastern United States as a stereotype for working-class urban Italian-Americans.[100]
Guinea
(U.S.) someone of Italian descent. (Derives from “Guinea Negro”, was called because of some Italians who had dark complexions)[101]
Terrone
(Italy) A slur often used by north Italians to refer to southern Italians, especially Sicilians.
Wog
(Aus) Australian slur for the first wave of Southern European immigrants and their descendants that contrasted with the dominant Anglo-Saxon/Anglo-Celtic colonial stock. Used mostly for Mediterraneans and Southern Europeans, including the Spanish, Italians, Greeks, Macedonians, Lebanese, Arabs, Croatians and Serbians.
Wop
(U.S.) A racial term for anyone of Italian descent, derived from the Italian dialectism, “guappo“, close to “dude, swaggerer” and other informal appellations, a greeting among male Neapolitans.[102][103] With Out Passport/Papers or Working On Pavement are popular inaccurate etymologies for the slur, supposedly derived from Italians that arrived to North America as immigrants without papers and worked in construction and blue collar work. These acronyms are dismissed as folk etymologyor backronyms by etymologists.

Kike or kyke
(Chiefly U.S.) Ashkenazi Jews. Possibly from kikel, Yiddish for “circle”. Immigrant Jews who couldn’t read English often signed legal documents with an “O” (similar to an “X”, to which Jews objected because “X” also symbolizes a cross).[104]
Yid
a Jew, from its use as an endonym among Yiddish-speaking Jews.[105]

Lebo, Lebbo
(Chiefly Aus) Someone of Lebanese descent, usually a Lebanese Australian.[106]
Wog
(Aus) Australian slur for the first wave of Southern European immigrants and their descendants that contrasted with the dominant Anglo-Saxon/Anglo-Celtic colonial stock. Originally used mostly for Mediterraneans and Southern Europeans, including the Spanish, Italians, Greeks, and Macedonians, expanded to include Mediterranean people of the Middle East or Levantine, including the Lebanese.

Bulgaroskopian
(Greece) Used by Greeks when referring to the Macedonians in an attempt to deny self-identification [107][108]
Macedonist
(Bulgaria) A derogatory term used by Bulgarians to identify Macedonians [109]
Pseudomacedonian
(Greece) Used by Greeks to refer to the Macedonians in an attempt to deny self-identification [110]
Skopjan or Skopjian, Skopiana or Skopianika
(Greece) A term used by Greeks to refer to Macedonians in an attempt to deny self-identification[108][111][112][113][114][115][116][117]

Polack, Polak, Pollack, Pollock, Polock
(US, UK, Canada) A person of Polish descent.

Russki, Russkie 
Sometimes disparaging when used by foreigners for “Russian“,[118] although in the Russian language, it is a neutral term which simply means an ethnic Russian as opposed to a citizen of the Russian Federation.

Mulatto 
(Origin Americas) Mulatto is a term used to refer to a person who is born from one white parent. The term is generally considered archaic by some and inadvertently derogatory, especially in the African-American community. The term is widely used in Latin America and Caribbean usually without suggesting any insult. Historically in the American South, the term mulatto was applied also at times to persons with an admixture of Native Americans, and African Americans in general. In early American history, the term mulatto was also used to refer to persons of Native American and European ancestry.
Uncle Tom 
(U.S. minorities) term for an African-American, Latino, or Asian who panders to white people; a “sellout” (from the title character of Harriet Beecher Stowe‘s Uncle Tom’s Cabin.)
Oreo
Africans that practice white culture, called this because they are “black on the outside, white on the inside” according to users of the term.
Aunt Jemima / Aunt Jane / Aunt Mary / Aunt Sally / Aunt Thomasina 
(U.S. Blacks) a black woman who “kisses up” to whites, a “sellout”, female counterpart of Uncle Tom (see also “Coconut” below).[119] Taken from the popular syrup of the same name, where “Aunt Jemima” is represented as a black woman.[120]
Afro-Saxon 
(North America) A young white male devotee of black pop culture.[121]
Ann 
A white woman to a black person, or a black woman who acts too much like a white one. While Miss Ann, also just plain Ann, is a derisive reference to the white woman, by extension it is applied to any black woman who puts on airs and tries to act like Miss Ann.[122]
Wigger, Wegro 
is a slang term for a white person who allophilically emulates mannerisms, slangs and fashions stereotypically associated with urban African Americans; especially in relation to hip hop culture.
Rhineland Bastard 
was a derogatory term used in the Weimar Republic and Nazi Germany to describe Afro-German children of mixed German and African parentage, who were fathered by Africans serving as French colonial troops occupying the Rhineland after World War I.

Mulatto 
(Origin Americas) Mulatto is a term used to refer to a person who is born from one white parent. The term is generally considered archaic by some and inadvertently derogatory, especially in the African-American community. The term is widely used in Latin America and Caribbean usually without suggesting any insult. Historically in the American South, the term mulatto was applied also at times to persons with an admixture of Native Americans, and African Americans in general. In early American history, the term mulatto was also used to refer to persons of Native American and European ancestry.
Zambo 
are racial terms used in the Spanish and Portuguese Empires and occasionally today to identify individuals in the Americas who are of mixed African and Amerindian ancestry (the analogous English term, considered a slur, is sambo).
Lobos 
In Mexico, Black Native Americans are known as lobos (literally meaning wolves), they formed a sizeable minority in the past.

Mulatto 
(Origin Americas) Mulatto is a term used to refer to a person who is born from one white parent. The term is generally considered archaic by some and inadvertently derogatory, especially in the African-American community. The term is widely used in Latin America and Caribbean usually without suggesting any insult. Historically in the American South, the term mulatto was applied also at times to persons with an admixture of Native Americans, and African Americans in general. In early American history, the term mulatto was also used to refer to persons of Native American and European ancestry.
Apple
(North America) a Native American who is “red on the outside, white on the inside”. Used primarily by other Native Americans to indicate someone who has lost touch with their cultural identity. First used in the 1970s.[123]

American-Born Confused Desi, or ABCD
(Asian Indians in U.S.): used for American-born South Asians including Indian/ Pakistani/ Bangladeshi (mainly Indians as Indians are the largest number of “South Asians”) who are confused about their cultural identity. This is often used humorously without any derogatory meaning.

Banana
(North America; UK; Malaysia) an East or Southeast Asian person living in a Western country (e.g., an East Asian American) who is yellow on the outside, white on the inside. Used primarily by East or Southeast Asians to indicate someone who has lost touch with the cultural identity of his or her parents.[124]

Coconut
(U.S.) a person of Hispanic descent who is accused of acting ‘white’.[125]
(US/SA) a black person who is accused of “trying to be white”.[126][127]
(UK) a brown person of South Asian descent who has assimilated into Western culture.[128][129][130]
(New Zealand/Australia) a Pacific Islander. Named after the coconut, the nut from the coconut palm; in Australian Aboriginal culture used in the American sense, as one who adapts to, or is adopted by White society; it derives from the fact that a coconut is brown on the outside and white on the inside (see also “Oreo” above).
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