Officer arrested, will face second-degree manslaughter charge in killing of Daunte Wright

Former Brooklyn Center police officer Kimberly A. Potter was arrested late Wednesday morning at the offices of the state Bureau of Criminal Apprehension, the agency said in a statement.

Potter, who resigned from the police department on Tuesday, was booked into Hennepin County jail shortly after noon on a charge of probable cause second-degree manslaughter in the shooting death on Sunday of Daunte Wright, jail records show. The Washington County Attorney’s office was expected to file charges later in the day.

Potter is being represented by attorney Earl Gray, who was not immediately available for comment.

Attorney Ben Crump, who said he has been retained by Wright’s family, issued a statement Wednesday with co-counsel Jeff Storms and Antonio Romanucci in response to the charges.

“While we appreciate that the district attorney is pursuing justice for Daunte, no conviction can give the Wright family their loved one back,” the statement said. “This was no accident. This was an intentional, deliberate, and unlawful use of force,” the statement read. “Driving while Black continues to result in a death sentence. A 26-year veteran of the force knows the difference between a Taser and a firearm.”

A second-degree manslaughter charge carries a maximum sentence of 10 years in prison or a $20,000 fine or both.

Minneapolis defense attorney Barry Edwards said statutory maximum sentences don’t mean much, as judges instead follow guidelines from the state Sentencing Guidelines Commission. In the case of someone with no prior felonies facing a second-degree manslaughter conviction, the presumptive and more likely sentence would be four years, he said. And even then, a judge may consider probation instead of prison.

“If it were my client, I would argue for probation … and expect a good chance of winning,” Edwards said.

Hennepin County Attorney Mike Freeman referred the case to Washington County Attorney Pete Orput under a practice adopted last year among metro area county attorney’s offices for deadly police shootings. It calls for the county attorney in the jurisdiction where the shooting took place to refer the case to one of the other counties, or the state Attorney General’s Office, to avoid the appearance of a conflict of interest.

The BCA investigated the shooting.

Potter, 48, joined the Brooklyn Center police force in 1995 at age 22. She was placed on standard administrative leave following the shooting.

Potter was training in a new officer on Sunday at about 2 p.m. when she and two officers stopped a car near N. 63rd and Orchard avenues in Brooklyn Center. Former Brooklyn Center police chief Tim Gannon, who also resigned Tuesday, told media that officers stopped Wright’s car because it had an expired tag, and when they checked his name found he had a warrant.

Hennepin County District Court records show a warrant was issued April 2 for Wright after he failed to make his first court appearance on a case filed in March of carrying a pistol without a permit, a gross misdemeanor, and fleeing police, a misdemeanor.

In bodycam footage released by the Brooklyn Center Police Department, Wright is seen getting out of his car during the stop and standing near the open driver’s door as one of the officers pulls out handcuffs. A few moments later, Wright starts to struggle with the officers and gets back into his car. Potter shouts “Taser!” three times before firing a single bullet, then says “Holy shit. I just shot him.”

With Wright in the driver’s seat, the car pulls away. The car crashed a short distance away when it hit another vehicle. Wright died at the scene. The Hennepin County Medical Examiner’s Office said Wright died of a gunshot wound to the chest and labeled his death a homicide.

Potter’s arrest marks at least the third time that a U.S. law enforcement officer faced or faces criminal charges for killing someone in what they claim or what appears to be a mix-up between a gun and a Taser.

A 73-year-old volunteer reserve deputy in Oklahoma was charged with second-degree manslaughter in the 2015 death of Eric Harris. Bay Area Rapid Transit police officer Johannes Mehserle was convicted of involuntary manslaughter in a jury trial and sentenced to two years in prison for the 2009 shooting of Oscar Grant III. A third such deadly mix-up that resulted in the 2002 death of Everardo Torres did not lead to criminal charges against the officer.

Law enforcement on Tuesday erected concrete barricades and tall metal fencing around the perimeter of Potter’s multilevel home in Champlin. Two police cars guarded the driveway behind fortified fences marked with signs reading “Caution: Lasers in Use.” Her street was lined with paper “No Parking” signs and blocked to nonresidential traffic. Motorists entering the area were greeted by a buzzing cellphone alert from local police to “expect protest activity in your neighborhood over the next few days.”

At the home of former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin last spring, protesters defaced his property in the aftermath of George Floyd’s death, scrawling “Murderer” in red paint on the driveway.

Kentucky grand jury indicts 1 of 3 officers in fatal Breonna Taylor police shooting

13:29 PT — The grand jury has indicted just one officer, Brett Hankison, on charges of wanton endangerment. The officer was not charged because of shooting Breonna Taylor … he was charged with shooting into a neighboring apartment. The other 2 officers who fired shots the night Breonna Taylor was killed were not charged. In other words, no one was charged for killing Breonna.

Hankison has been indicted on three counts of wanton endangerment in the first degree — for firing recklessly and without due regard for life. His bail has been set at $15,000. Wanton endangerment carries a maximum penalty of 5 years if convicted.

The indictment has already sparked anger.  Rev. Al Sharpton called it “grossly insufficient.”

AG Daniel Cameron will hold a news conference any minute, taking about the charges, why certain officers were not charged, and the prospect of unrest in the wake of the grand jury’s decision.

Cameron had told the media he was waiting on a ballistics report from the FBI, which at the time he claimed was just about the last piece of the puzzle before he could wrap his investigation. Once he got that, he walked it back and said it was inconclusive — and then eventually kicked the whole case over to a grand jury out of Jefferson County … presumably to appear impartial in the conclusion that’s ultimately reached.

It’s a tense moment — and you can tell by what the City of Louisville did earlier this week … preemptively declaring a state of emergency and putting a 9 PM to 6:30 AM curfew in place in anticipation of the announcement. Ominous to say the least, they’re clearly erring on the side of caution.

Cops were told they couldn’t take time off for a while starting this week … so it’s basically all hands on deck — the assumption being if no charges are brought forth, chaos will erupt.

The grand jury will present their report to a judge at 1:15 PM ET, and Cameron’s presser is set to begin shortly thereafter … obviously, we and the rest of the world will be watching.

As we reported … Brett Hankison — 1 of the 3 cops who fired their weapons during the deadly March 13 raid at Breonna’s home — was already fired from the forceback in June.

Police Chief Robert Schroeder had said Hankison had “violated obedience to rules and regulations,” and use of deadly force while serving the no-knock warrant.

The other officers involved in Breonna’s death — Sgt. Jonathan Mattingly and Myles Cosgrove — had already been placed on administrative reassignment but were still part of the force.

Cameron has asked the public to remain patient during the investigation … adding his team had been working nonstop — and the grand jury finally convened this week to decide whether to indict the officers.

As we reported … Oprah went to extraordinary lengths to push for justice in the case, including buying 26 billboards around Louisville. Likewise, countless professional athletes, entertainers and ordinary citizens on social media have kept Breonna’s name, and her tragic case, in the spotlight.

Her death has been controversial from the start. As we reported officers initially reported Breonna was uninjured during the raid … and prosecutors seemingly tried to smear her in a plea bargain with her ex-BF.

One officer involved in the city’s massive corruption scandal said officers kept the replicas “in case we accidentally hit somebody or got into a shootout, so we could plant them.”

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Last week, the beginning of an explosive corruption trial involving eight members of Baltimore’s elite Gun Trace Task Force revealed that a handful of Baltimore cops allegedly kept fake guns in their patrol cars to plant on innocent people—a failsafe they could use if they happened to shoot an unarmed suspect, the Baltimore Sun reports.

Detective Maurice Ward, who’s already pleaded guilty to corruption charges, testified that he and his partners were told to carry the replicas and BB guns “in case we accidentally hit somebody or got into a shootout, so we could plant them.” The directive allegedly came from the team’s sergeant, Wayne Jenkins, the Washington Post reports. Though Ward didn’t say whether or not the tactic was ever used, Detective Marcus Taylor—another cop swept up in the scandal—was carrying a fake gun almost identical to his service weapon when he was arrested last year, according to the Sun.

The revelation is just one of many egregious abuses that have come out of the sprawling trial that theSun has called “Baltimore’s biggest police corruption scandal in memory.” Prosecutors say the squad, which was tasked with getting illegal guns off the streets, abused its power by robbing suspects and innocent people, raiding homes without warrants, and selling confiscated drugs, among other crimes.

But the BB gun testimony is particularly disturbing in light of 12-year-old Tamir Rice’s death in 2014, the 13-year-old in Baltimore who was shot twice by cops in 2016 after he allegedly sprinted from them with a replica gun in his hand, and the 86 people fatally shot by police in 2015 and 2016 who were spotted carrying toy guns.

Six of the eight task force members charged in the corruption scandal have pleaded guilty to racketeering charges, but Taylor and Detective Daniel Hersl have pleaded not guilty. They’re currently on trial while several of their former partners testify against them.

 

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Dallas Police Officer Kills Her Neighbor in His Apartment, Saying She Mistook It for Her Own

A Dallas police officer fatally shot a neighbor inside the man’s apartment late Thursday night, claiming that she mistook his apartment for her own and believed he was an intruder, the police said.

After completing her shift on Thursday, the officer went to her apartment building across the street from the Dallas Police Department’s headquarters shortly before 10 p.m. But the officer, who was still in police uniform, did not go to her own unit and instead tried to enter the residence of a neighbor, Botham Shem Jean. She then shot him, the authorities said.

Mr. Jean, 26, was taken to a hospital, where he was pronounced dead.

It was not clear how the officer, whose name has not been released, mistook where she lived or why she opened fire.

Chief U. Renee Hall of the Dallas Police Department said that investigators were seeking an arrest warrant to charge the officer with manslaughter. Chief Hall said it became clear in the beginning of the investigation that the case was not a standard officer-involved shooting.

“We were dealing with what appears to be a very unique situation,” Chief Hall said at a news conference on Friday afternoon. “Right now, there are more questions than we have answers.”

The Police Department asked the Texas Rangers, the state’s top law enforcement agency, to take over the investigation.

Chief Hall said that the officer had been questioned only when other officers responded to the shooting on Thursday night. While the officers took a blood sample from her to test for alcohol or drugs, investigators have been unable to further question her.

The chief identified the officer only as a patrol officer who is white, saying that the officer was not in custody and that she did not know her whereabouts.

Within hours of the shooting, there was an outpouring of grief for Mr. Jean from Dallas to St. Lucia, his home country in the Caribbean, as well as demands that the officer be charged in his death.

Mr. Jean was born in the Caribbean and later moved to the United States, where he graduated in 2016 from Harding University in Arkansas. He was active on campus and in student groups, including as a member of the Good News Singers, the university said on Friday. With a booming, soulful voice, Mr. Jean often led the group in songs.

Bruce McLarty, the university’s president, said on Friday that he recalled when he asked Mr. Jean in 2014 to sing a hymn at a major event at Harding, which is associated with the Churches of Christ. Mr. Jean agreed but later confessed that he had said yes without actually knowing the song.

“He called back to St. Lucia and asked his grandmother to teach him that old hymn on the phone,” Dr. McLarty said in a statement. “He shared it with us at Lectureship that night, and it was a truly special moment.”

Mr. Jean moved to Dallas after college. After an internship at the accounting firm PwC, formerly known as PricewaterhouseCoopers, he joined the company full time in July 2016 in its Dallas offices, the company said. He was currently a risk assurance experienced associate.

“This is a terrible tragedy,” a PwC spokeswoman said in an email. “We are simply heartbroken to hear of his death.”

Mr. Jean was a member of a prominent family in St. Lucia. His mother, Allison Jean, was a senior official in St. Lucia’s Ministry of Education, Innovation, Gender Relations and Sustainable Development. A family friend said that Ms. Jean could not comment on Friday because she was receiving chemotherapy treatment.

One of Mr. Jean’s uncles is the chief executive of a regional water utility in St. Lucia, while another uncle, Earl Jean, played professional soccer in Europe and on the island’s national team.

“How can this nasty world take you away from me,” Earl Jean wrote on Facebook on Friday. “This is the worst day of my life thus far.”

Police: Syracuse man pointed loaded gun at officers before being arrested!

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Nahshon Nance, 20.

SYRACUSE, N.Y. — A Syracuse man who pointed a loaded gun at officers after a domestic dispute was arrested Monday, according to Syracuse police.

Nashon Nance, 20, of Syracuse, was arrested and charged with criminal possession of a weapon, criminal possession of a firearm, menacing, menacing a police officer and harassment, police said.

Officers responded to the 100 block of Smith Lane at 11:33 p.m. after receiving a call about a domestic dispute that involved a weapon, police said. The victim told officers her boyfriend, Nance, punched her in the mouth and pulled out a handgun, police said. He pointed the gun at her and threatened to shoot her, she told officers.

During the officers’ investigation, Nance returned to the apartment, police said. When officers saw Nance, they told him to show his hands, police said. Instead, Nance pointed the gun at the officers before running away, police said. He dropped the weapon as he ran away, but officers arrested him outside of an apartment building, police said.

The gun was a loaded Smith and Wesson Colt 45 revolver, police said.

Nance is being held at the Onondaga County Justice Center, pending his arraingnment, police said.

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Video Captures University Of Chicago Police Officer Shooting Student Near Campus!

Warning: Video contains graphic content and language. Video provided by the University of Chicago shows the shooting of a 21-year-old student by a campus police officer on April 3, 2018, in the Hyde Park neighborhood. The video was edited by the university to obscure certain visual details.

A University of Chicago police officer shot and seriously wounded a 21-year-old student who charged an officer with a metal pipe near the South Side campus late Tuesday, authorities said.

Body camera footage showing the shooting, which happened off campus just before 10:15 p.m. in the Hyde Park neighborhood, was released by the school on Wednesday night.

Three U. of C. police officers responding to a call of a burglary in the 5300 block of South Kimbark Avenue encountered a man — later identified as a student — breaking car and apartment windows with a long metal pipe, university officials said in an email to students.

The officers ordered the student to drop the pipe, but he refused and charged at the officer in an alley, university President Robert Zimmer and Provost Daniel Diermeier said in the email.

One of the officers fired his weapon, hitting the student in the shoulder, according to the university. The student was initially taken to Northwestern Memorial Hospital in serious condition, authorities said.

The video shows, at one point before the shooting, the officer stepping back. The officer was executing a “tactical retreat,” a practice he learned during crisis intervention training, the university said. The approach is intended to create a safe distance for the officer to call out commands rather than immediately subdue the subject.

The university also confirmed the officer, who has been on the force for two years, fired once, which is consistent with his training to shoot to end the threat. The officer involved has had 40 hours of crisis intervention training and eight hours of mental health first aid training.

In the video, an officer can be heard saying, “Twenty-one, mental. He’s a mental.”

Warning: Video contains graphic content and language. Video provided by the University of Chicago shows the shooting of a 21-year-old student by a campus police officer on April 3, 2018, in the Hyde Park neighborhood. The video was edited by the university to obscure certain visual details.

The university was not commenting on the mental state of the student who was shot.

The area where the shooting happened is patrolled by both U. of C. and Chicago policeofficers.

After learning the injured man was a student, U. of C. police contacted his parents, the university said. It is the first shooting involving a U. of C. police officer in the agency’s 40-year history, said university spokeswoman Marielle Sainvilus.

“This is a difficult incident for our community, and our concern is with all of the individuals involved and their families,” Zimmer and Diermeier said in the email issued by the university. “Maintaining our community’s safety, security and well-being is of paramount importance. Support services and resources for students will be provided by the college and Campus and Student Life.”

The officer involved was placed on mandatory administrative leave pending the outcome of the investigation, in accordance with department policy.

Chicago police are investigating the incident, said Anthony Guglielmi, chief spokesman for the Chicago Police Department. CPD is in charge of investigating campus police shootings.

The University Department of Safety and Security, which oversees the campus police department, is also reviewing the shooting, according to the university.

With a force of about 100 officers, the U. of C. police serve as the primary law enforcement agency on campus and, beyond the university’s borders, offer backup patrol to Chicago police in an area bounded by 37th Street, 64th Street, Lake Shore Drive and Cottage Grove Avenue, according to the university. That off-campus patrol agreement was cemented in city ordinance back in 2011, city records show.

State law grants campus police officers on private universities the same arrest powers as city and state law enforcement officers. Campus police officers are required to complete mandatory state training, including firearms training.

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OLD TWEETS From Man Murdered By Sacramento Police (Stephon Clark) . . . Talking SPICY About Black Women . . . And Black Lives Matter!!

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Last week, Sacramento police officers illegally entered Stephon Clarke’s backyard – and shot him down in cold blood. Since the shooting, where NO OFFICER WAS PUNISHED, the entire city has been on edge.

But since the shooting, people have been wondering about Stephon’s political views and beliefs. Well, MTO News EXCLUSIVELY obtained old tweets from Stephon – that show his feelings towards Black women, and the Black Lives Matter Movement.

Clarke has just been laid to rest. At his funeral, Rev. Al Sharpton called out the gunning down of this young, unarmed Black man, saying:

“This is not a local matter! They have been killing young black men all over the country, and we are here to say that we are going to stand with Stephon Clark and his family […] We are going to make Donald Trump and the whole world deal with the issue of police conduct!”

His mother Cecile Thompsom also spoke at the funeral saying:

“No mother should have to go through this and lose their children this type of way… This is horrific, this is violence, and all mothers need to get up and stand for peace and love because our children should not be dying like this.”

Here are some of Stephon’s tweets regarding Black women. He could well have been trolling. People on social media often post things for the shock factor:

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Here are his tweets about Black Lives Matter (Stephon didn’t believe in it, since his son is half-Asian)

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Here’s Stephon’s babys mother talking about the complexion of their son:

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