White gang members forcibly tattoo a racial slur on a member and spell it wrong, cops say

Lucian “Luke” Evans, Mary Elizabeth Durham and Brandon HayleyMARION COUNTY SHERIFF’S OFFICE

 

CORRECTION: The previous headline and first paragraph of this story misstated the race of the victim. Michael Hart is a white man.

White members of a gang forcibly covered a fellow gang member’s gang tattoo with a phrase including a racial slur, according to Marion County Sheriff’s Office.

The evidence on Michael Hart’s neck said, “F— you, Niger.”

According to what police say Lucian Evans told them, he, Brandon Hayley, Brett Singleton and Mary Elizabeth Durham were trying to discipline Hart, not insult an African nation. Hart had violated gang rules, Evans said.

Even if between gang members, this kind of activity violates rules in every jurisdiction in the United States.

Michael Hart as he went to prison in March for methamphetamine possession. Inside the tattooed rectangle on his neck is the racial slur cover up of the gang patch.

Durham, 35, was arrested for aggravated battery and armed robbery, her eighth arrest since 2009. The seventh arrest since 2010 for Hayley, 28, was on two counts of battery, one count each of aggravated battery and armed robbery.

Evans, 40, was booked for aggravated battery, armed robbery, two counts of second-degree larceny, fraud with a false receipt and possession of a weapon by a convicted felon. Evans did three months for grand theft with a firearm and two years and two months for cocaine possession and robbery.

Singleton, 45, has yet to be charged in this incident, which occurred in Salt Springs Jan. 28.

Hart told police the charged trio and Singleton showed up at his home that night, shut the door and demanded he go with them to cover his gang tattoo or patch, “CWB.” He recalled Evans putting his hand on a sheathed, fixed blade knife. Evans later told police that Singleton had the knife.

“Why can’t you cover my patch right where I’m sitting?” Hart said he asked.

He said Hayley and Evans held him down while Singleton began covering the tattoo. But Hart still struggled and fought so, he said, Hayley knocked him out with a foreign object.

Hart recalls fading back in briefly to Durham doing the tatting and saying, “I’ve never done this before” and someone replying, “It’s okay. It doesn’t matter.”

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Hart told police he passed out again from the pain. When he woke up, his phone was gone as well as any sense of comfort.

“…when he woke up, his pants were twisted and his ‘butt’ hurt,” the arrest report said. “(Hart) stated he was wearing blue jeans and felt something wet in his pants. (Hart) stated when he looked at his pants, he saw what he believed to be blood. Michael stated he felt like he’d been sodomized, but could not provide any more details.”

The arrest report said the old tattoo was visible under the new one.

 

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‘You’re a rude n—–:’ Contractor calls black man racist slur during confrontation!

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COLUMBUS, Ohio (WSYX/WTTE) – A Columbus man is speaking out after he recorded video of a Central Ohio contractor calling him n****r several times during a confrontation outside his home.

Charless Lovett says it all started Tuesday morning because of a disagreement over who had the right of way in a lane on Morse Road. Lovett claims the man got upset with him because he thought Lovett had cut him off on Morse Road in the area of Interstate 71 and Sinclair Road. Lovett says the man nearly sideswiped him trying to cross over from the Sinclair Road lane into the Morse Road lane, and Lovett honked at him.

Lovett says that’s when the man, who was in a Uriahs Heating Cooling Refrigeration work vehicle at the time, followed him to his house in a nearby north Columbus neighborhood. As Lovett got out of his car in his driveway, he began recording on his iPhone as he walked toward the van at the end of his driveway.

In the video, the man says he didn’t follow Lovett to his house, but is headed to a job in the area.

“I just want to let you know what a n****r you are,” the man can clearly be heard saying, after Lovett asked how he can help him.

(WARNING: The video below contains profanity. Viewer discretion advised.)

The man continues, repeating the line multiple times, then tells Lovett, “You’re a rude n****r.”

“So, I’m a n****r because you can’t read street signs right?” Lovett challenges.

The man then argues with Lovett about whether he cut him off, and tells Lovett he feels entitled.

“How do I feel entitled?” Lovett challenges. “You feel entitled because I’m black.”

The confrontation changes, as the worker challenges Lovett’s comments about working for what he has, asking, “You got a job?” and “You paid for that?” in reference to his car.

The nearly three-minute confrontation was all captured on video, as they continue arguing about who had the right of way, with the employee telling Lovett his rudeness is unacceptable and he’s glad he got to tell him that.

“I’m glad I got all this information, that I’ll be sending to the state, since you’re a state contractor,” Lovett says, pointing at the truck that shows Uriahs’ logo. The van also shows a “State Contracting License” text with the company’s license number.

ABC 6/FOX 28 reached out to the company and the driver, Jeffrey Whitman. While he wouldn’t go on camera, Whitman said in a phone call that he’s not a racist and that he regrets it.

He said, “I lost my head.” Whitman added that after Lovett posted the video on Facebook, he began receiving threats. When ABC 6/FOX 28 asked why he would say that word over and over, he hung up.

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In a statement, Whitman said

“To Charles Lovett and the community,

I apologize for my use of the n word towards Charles Lovett on Tuesday, July 24th. I understand that using the n-word was not only hurtful towards Lovett as an individual, but hurtful towards the Black community at large. Using the word was dehumanizing, unacceptable, and inexcusable. My actions reflect an unhealthy mindset I have developed and I need to work to change. I have served the Black community for the last 9 years, installing furnaces and water heaters with pride. My actions that day are not a reflection of my feelings towards the Black community. I also understand that racial tensions in America are higher than before, and I regret my part in contributing to that tension. I realize that words are hollow without action, and because of the hurt I have caused, I hope I have the opportunity to give back to the Black community that I have harmed in a meaningful way.”

When contacted by ABC 6/FOX 28 Tuesday, Whitman didn’t want to speak on camera but said in a phone call he regretted it and “I lost my head.”

He said he punched a woman for calling him Nigger. A jury called it murder.

Robert Coleman, 27, was found guilty of second-degree murder Monday in Alexandria Circuit Court. (Alexandria Detention Center)

 

“We of course remain disappointed that they didn’t see it as manslaughter,” Coleman’s attorney, Robert Jenkins, said after the jury returned. He said Coleman and his family were “grateful” for the jury’s recommended sentence, given that second-degree murder can carry a punishment of up to 40 years. It reflected, Jenkins said, “that this was not something that he wanted to happen, that he did not intend to take someone’s life.”

A judge will formally sentence Coleman on May 24, but deviations from jury recommendations are rare. He is being held at the Alexandria Detention Center.

“In an all-too-often repeated theme, a tragedy unfolded because of a defendant’s inability to tolerate a perceived slight,” Commonwealth’s Attorney Bryan Porter said in a statement. “Verbal arguments should never devolve into physical altercations because physical altercations often bring devastating consequences.”

[Woman assaulted outside a convenience store in Alexandria dies]

Coleman and Montiel-Benitez were strangers. Coleman was buying cigarettes. Montiel-Benitez was buying alcohol at the convenience store near the Mark Center on Seminary Road.

The source of the animosity between them remains a mystery. Surveillance video shows they engaged in a brief conversation, but there is no audio. Coleman’s girlfriend, Nikki Howard, testified she could not hear the entire conversation but broke the two up. In the video, Montiel-Benitez is seen walking to Coleman says that is when she called him the n-word; Howard remembered her cursing. In the video Coleman can be seen chasing Montiel-Benitez outside.

 

Through the leaves of a tree, another camera captures the punch that put Montiel-Benitez in a coma from which she did not recover.

Coleman fled the scene and was picked up the next day when a detective recognized him in the surveillance video. He at first denied involvement in what he thought was simply an assault. When he was told Montiel-Benitez was in critical condition, he admitted hitting her, but said he had not meant to cause serious harm.

He also thought the heavyset woman with short hair was a man, he told detectives.

Lord argued the focus on Montiel-Benitez’s appearance at trial, as well as the high level of alcohol in her system, was disrespectful to the dead.the door and then turning.

“She deserves to be treated with more humanity,” he told the jury.

He said Coleman was “a bully who was looking for a fight” and picked on Montiel-Benitez, who was just trying to get away.

Jenkins told jurors Montiel-Benitez’s .351 blood alcohol level and size might help explain why Coleman believed “this was going to be mutual combat, and he struck first.”

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