Aunt of dead kids drove around with their bodies for months after killing them, police say

Documents allege that 33-year-old Nicole Michelle Johnson drove around the dead children in the trunk of her car for months. One of the children had been in the trunk of the car since May of 2020.

Baltimore County Police have charged Johnson with failure to report the deaths of the children, child abuse resulting in death, and neglect.

The bodies of 7-year-old Joshlyn Marie James Johnson and 5-year-old Larry Darnell O’Neal were discovered just after 11 p.m. on Wednesday when officers conducted a traffic stop in Essex, Maryland. 

Johnson was initially pulled over for speeding in a car that had fake paper tags from West Virginia. The vehicle was unregistered and uninsured, police say.

The officer issued citations to Johnson, at which point, she allegedly stated:

It don’t matter, I won’t be here in five days. Y’all going to see me on the news, y’all going to see me on the news making my big debut.

The dead children were discovered as the car was being prepared to be towed. Documents state that when Johnson went to the trunk of her car to get her belongings, the officer smelled “the unmistakable odor of decomposition.”

Johnson removed a plastic tote and a clear trash bag from the car. The officer noticed maggots in the clear bag. Johnson claimed that there were just dirty blankets inside the bag.

The officer continued to have Johnson remove the blankets, revealing a suitcase. When Johnson revealed the body of a child inside the suitcase, officers say she ran. She was apprehended a short time later.

The body of the second child was discovered inside the plastic tote by homicide investigators.

Johnson told investigators that both children are her sister’s. She apparently turned them over to Johnson because she said that she could not care for them.

Johnson also told investigators that she was at the Regal Inn in May of 2020 when she became angered at one of the children and hit her several times, causing her to fall and hit her head.

At that time, she said she placed the child in a suitcase and put the suitcase in her car.

Johnson also told investigators about a time two months ago, when the second child wanted to lay down in the back of her car. She said she noticed blood on the child’s left leg but didn’t say more about the injury. The child never woke up. At that point, she put the child in the tote and kept him in the trunk next to his sister.

The autopsy revealed how malnourished the children were. The 7-year-old child weighed 18 pounds when she died. Her 5-year-old brother weighed 21 pounds.

MORGUE WORKER ARRESTED AFTER GIVING BIRTH TO A DEAD MAN’S BABY

Morgue worker arrested after giving birth to a dead man’s baby

A 26-year-old morgue worker was arrested this morning after a DNA test revealed that her newborn child was the result of a necrophiliac intercourse with a man she was supposed to autopsy.

Jennifer Burrows, an assistant pathologist with the Jackson County medical examiner services, is accused of having sex with dozens of corpses over the course of the last two years, a behavior which led the birth of a baby boy on January 7.

According to the Kansas City Missouri Police Department, her baby is the son of a man who died in a car accident in March 2017, and whose body she was supposed to autopsy. They allege that Ms. Burrows sexually abused more than 60 other dead bodies, belonging to males aged from 17 to 71 years of age.

“We opened an investigation into this case in October after we were informed that the suspect may have been sexually abusing corpses,” Police Chief Forté told reporters. “We accumulated enough evidence over the last few months to obtain a warrant for a paternity test on her newborn son. It confirmed our suspicions, that the father of her child was, indeed, a 57-year old veterinarian from Texas who was driving through the county when he had a fatal car accident. All the evidence that we have gathered suggests that he had never met Ms. Burrows before his demise and that he was already dead when the baby was conceived.”

There are currently no laws (state or federal) governing or explicitly outlawing the practice of necrophilia since the corpse is considered human remains and no longer living. Therefore, it is technically legal in the state of Missouri, and Ms. Burrows’ actions are judged as an indecent treatment of a corpse.

She is facing a total of 158 charges, including indecent treatment of a corpse, disorderly conduct, indecent exposure and possession of illegal drugs.

The psychologists and experts that we interviewed were divided in their interpretation of Ms. Burrows’ case.

Some, like Professor Isabella Ramirez of the University of Missouri, believe that the young woman was suffering from a psychosis and had, at least partially, lost any notion of reality.

Others, like Dr. Gerald Porter, a well-known psychologist and expert in sexual disorders associated with the Institute of Psychological Sciences, believe that the accused is clearly a compulsive necrophiliac and that her choice of profession was inspired by her sexual deviation in the first place.

All seem to agree, however, that the 26-year-old woman was suffering from mental problems and that she will probably register a plea of insanity.

Disturbing video shows mom dunking baby’s head under water

SPALDING COUNTY, Ga. – A 5-month-old girl is OK after police said her mother recorded herself plunging the baby’s head underwater.

Laquanda Mosley faces charges including aggravated assault with intent to murder, first-degree child cruelty and terroristic threats after police said she recorded a video of herself holding her baby underwater.

Channel 2’s Tom Jones tracked down the child’s father, who said he believes anger drove her actions.

“That was a vindictive act,” Kevin Dandridge said.

Dandridge said Mosley became upset and threatened to harm the child when he asked for custody. He said Mosley was angry at him and sent him the videos threatening to kill the child in retaliation.

He posted it on social media and it went viral. Dandridge, who lives out of state, said he posted it for one reason only.

“I just needed some help and I didn’t know how to locate her,” he explained.

He says a friend of Mosley’s saw his post and told him where she lives, and that’s how police found her.

Officers said the infant was taken to the hospital and was released.

Dandridge told Jones no father should have to see his child’s life threatened like that.

“I guess she just went off the deep end. I don’t understand,” he said.

Dandridge said Mosley was angry with him over money and the fact that he wanted custody of his child.

Police said when they arrived here at her home she had the baby and her 5- and 7-year-old children.

All the children in in the custody of child protective services.

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Daycare provider who hanged toddler in her basement sentenced to probation

636674104768235275-AP-Day-Care-Child-HangingNataliia Karia, center, with her lawyers Brock Hunter, right, and Ryan Else, reacts during her sentencing hearing in Hennepin County District Court in Minneapolis, Monday, July 16. Karia, a Minneapolis day care owner, was sentenced to 10 years of probation for trying to kill a toddler in her home by hanging him from a noose.

MINNEAPOLIS — A former day care provider convicted of hanging a toddler has been sentenced to probation.

Nataliia Karia received 10 years probation on Monday for hanging a toddler in her daycare and running over two men with her minivan, before attempting suicide. She had faced 13 years in prison. All of the victims of the November 2016 incident survived their injuries.

Through an interpreter, Karia asked for forgiveness.

“I apologize and I don’t know if you will be able to forgive me. I have no excuse for what I did,” she said.

Judge Jay Quam said this is one of the hardest cases he’s ever had adding if this was a normal case, given everything that happened, he would give the most severe sentence that he could.

But he says this was not a normal case.

Karia sobbed as the prosecutor ran through the details of what happened.

“She hung (him) by the neck with a homemade noose in her basement in Minneapolis. This case is about that little boy who very well could have taken his last breath in that basement,” assistant county attorney Christina Warren said.

Karia had pleaded guilty to attempted murder and criminal vehicular operation. Karia’s attorney argued the cause was mental illness brought on by abuse.

“This offense was aggravated, if not wholly caused, by abuse of Nataliia’s husband,” defense attorney Brockton Hunter said.

Hunter provided the judge with recordings they say shows her husband’s anger.

Karia told the judge, “Please help me back to my children.”

The prosecutor argued that mental illness is not a reason to give Karia probation instead of prison.

“It’s not that mentally ill shouldn’t go to prison. the Department of Corrections is incredibly well equipped to handle the needs of the mentally ill,” Warren said.

The sentencing was a continuation of proceedings that began in May. At that time, Claire and Jennifer Booth, the mothers of the toddler, gave emotional victim impact statements in court.

“Based on prior actions and history, I would not feel comfortable with simply probation. Because everybody that has testified today has said they trusted her with their children. Well you’re fine and you’re trustworthy and you’re caring until you’re not,” Claire Booth said on May 23.

In May, Denys Karia testified his mother suffered both physical and mental abuse in Ukraine and here in America. Denys said that his mother told him she had suicidal thoughts and a week before the incident told him she was worried she might hurt someone else, but her husband would not allow her to seek help.

Joseph Sabir, who saved the child from Karia’s basement, testified that he could tell she was not acting herself and told him to call the police.

“I believe what transpired that day was not a reflection of her and who she was from everything I’ve gathered from people. With a lot of medical care and treatment and support I don’t think she poses a risk to the public or her children,” Sabir said in May.

Judge Quam also handed down a 183 month stayed prison sentence, if she violates probation. Karia will be on house arrest for a couple months until the rest of probation details are determined. She could be released as early as Monday.

Following the sentencing, Jennifer Booth said, “Our family is looking forward to moving on. We have been fortunate to have a supportive, healing community surround us. We hope that Nataliia is able to move forward in her own healing journey and hope she gets the help she needs.”

Disturbed man allegedly killed ‘weird’ family who took him in!

ows_152415344551150William L. Hillman

A 21-year-old man fatally beat a mother and son who let him live in their rural Minnesota home, and the suspect offered no explanation to authorities other than his victims were “weird,” according to murder charges filed Thursday.

William L. Hillman, who has a history of mental illness and violence, was charged in Otter Tail County District Court with two counts of second-degree murder in the deaths of Denise McFadzen, 42, and Dalton McFadzen, 21. Hillman appeared in court Thursday and remains jailed.

Another son alerted the Sheriff’s Office to the attacks, and a deputy and a Perham police officer located their bodies about 5:15 a.m. Tuesday in the home off a long gravel road in Gorman Township, roughly 8 miles north of Perham.

Court records in nearby Cass County show that Hillman was ruled mentally ill in June 2016, soon after he punched his mother and threatened to kill her. He was committed to the Minnesota Security Hospital at St. Peter for treatment. That commitment ended in November 2017.

A psychologist’s evaluation leading up to the ruling concluded that Hillman was suffering from a “thought disorder” that hindered his ability to recognize reality. “He does pose a substantial likelihood of physical harm to others,” Dr. Charles Chmielewski wrote in his assessment.

1adouble041918Dalton McFadzen, 21, and Denise McFadzen, 42, were victims of “homicidal violence” Tuesday in a rural home near Perham, Minn., according to the Otter Tail County Sheriff’s Office.

According to the criminal complaint:

Denise McFadzen’s body was outside the entrance to the home, while her son’s body was in a bed. They had been beaten on the head with a large pipe wrench, which was located leaning on a wall and covered in blood, the document read.

Within moments of law enforcement learning of the killings, Hillman called 911 from a home down the road and said he had done a “bad thing” and should be arrested.

Under questioning and in bloodstained clothes, Hillman said he moved in with the McFadzens about six weeks earlier. The night before the killings, Hillman continued, he woke up in the middle of the night and doesn’t remember what happened next because everything went black.

An officer asked Hillman whether the McFadzens had ever threatened him, “and he said they had not,” the charges read. “He said they were just ‘weird.’ ”

He went on to say, “I’m sorry. I’m sorry I did it.”

Hillman also disclosed that he had hit his mother about two years earlier in Cass County, where he lived at the time. He was charged with a felony, but that case was dismissed based on mental illness, leading to his commitment to St. Peter for schizophrenia.

He said he was on medication for his illness “but stopped taking it five months ago,” about the time his commitment ended.

An online fundraising page is seeking contributions to pay for the victims’ funeral services and burial.

“Two people’s lives were senselessly taken by another individual,” campaign organizer Krystle Schwartz wrote. “They were the kindest, caring, loving people you would meet. They were kind enough to let someone in their lives without knowing the end result.”

Schwartz said Denise McFadzen leaves behind a husband of 20 years and other children.

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Video Captures University Of Chicago Police Officer Shooting Student Near Campus!

Warning: Video contains graphic content and language. Video provided by the University of Chicago shows the shooting of a 21-year-old student by a campus police officer on April 3, 2018, in the Hyde Park neighborhood. The video was edited by the university to obscure certain visual details.

A University of Chicago police officer shot and seriously wounded a 21-year-old student who charged an officer with a metal pipe near the South Side campus late Tuesday, authorities said.

Body camera footage showing the shooting, which happened off campus just before 10:15 p.m. in the Hyde Park neighborhood, was released by the school on Wednesday night.

Three U. of C. police officers responding to a call of a burglary in the 5300 block of South Kimbark Avenue encountered a man — later identified as a student — breaking car and apartment windows with a long metal pipe, university officials said in an email to students.

The officers ordered the student to drop the pipe, but he refused and charged at the officer in an alley, university President Robert Zimmer and Provost Daniel Diermeier said in the email.

One of the officers fired his weapon, hitting the student in the shoulder, according to the university. The student was initially taken to Northwestern Memorial Hospital in serious condition, authorities said.

The video shows, at one point before the shooting, the officer stepping back. The officer was executing a “tactical retreat,” a practice he learned during crisis intervention training, the university said. The approach is intended to create a safe distance for the officer to call out commands rather than immediately subdue the subject.

The university also confirmed the officer, who has been on the force for two years, fired once, which is consistent with his training to shoot to end the threat. The officer involved has had 40 hours of crisis intervention training and eight hours of mental health first aid training.

In the video, an officer can be heard saying, “Twenty-one, mental. He’s a mental.”

Warning: Video contains graphic content and language. Video provided by the University of Chicago shows the shooting of a 21-year-old student by a campus police officer on April 3, 2018, in the Hyde Park neighborhood. The video was edited by the university to obscure certain visual details.

The university was not commenting on the mental state of the student who was shot.

The area where the shooting happened is patrolled by both U. of C. and Chicago policeofficers.

After learning the injured man was a student, U. of C. police contacted his parents, the university said. It is the first shooting involving a U. of C. police officer in the agency’s 40-year history, said university spokeswoman Marielle Sainvilus.

“This is a difficult incident for our community, and our concern is with all of the individuals involved and their families,” Zimmer and Diermeier said in the email issued by the university. “Maintaining our community’s safety, security and well-being is of paramount importance. Support services and resources for students will be provided by the college and Campus and Student Life.”

The officer involved was placed on mandatory administrative leave pending the outcome of the investigation, in accordance with department policy.

Chicago police are investigating the incident, said Anthony Guglielmi, chief spokesman for the Chicago Police Department. CPD is in charge of investigating campus police shootings.

The University Department of Safety and Security, which oversees the campus police department, is also reviewing the shooting, according to the university.

With a force of about 100 officers, the U. of C. police serve as the primary law enforcement agency on campus and, beyond the university’s borders, offer backup patrol to Chicago police in an area bounded by 37th Street, 64th Street, Lake Shore Drive and Cottage Grove Avenue, according to the university. That off-campus patrol agreement was cemented in city ordinance back in 2011, city records show.

State law grants campus police officers on private universities the same arrest powers as city and state law enforcement officers. Campus police officers are required to complete mandatory state training, including firearms training.

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