NHS nurse, 35, killed herself after the stress of working 12-hour hospital shifts stopped her from settling down to have a family, inquest hears

 

  • Nurse Leona Goddard, 35, hanged herself at family home in Greater Manchester
  • Worked at mental health unit at Prestwich Hospital and was recently promoted
  • Ms Goddard had seen GP before death and said she ‘had nightmares about work’
  • For confidential support call the Samaritans on 116123 or visit a local Samaritans branch, see http://www.samaritans.org for details.

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A dedicated NHS mental health nurse killed herself after the stress of working 12 hour hospital shifts stopped her from settling down, an inquest has heard.

Leona Goddard, 35, wanted to have a family but struggled to have a social life after being landed with unpredictable work hours and extra responsibilities.

Although colleagues at Prestwich Hospital in Manchester rated her as ‘outstanding’ Miss Goddard developed low self esteem due to the long hours.

Ms Goddard was found hanged at her family home by mother Corrine Goodridge on October 3 2018, just six months after she got a promotion.

A hand written note across two pages of A4 paper detailed her ‘negative feelings, a downward spiral and feelings of self loathing.’

The inquest was told Miss Goddard had wanted to work as an occupational therapist but studied nursing and psychology and graduated at Manchester university in 2012.

A college friend Danielle Hinds said: ‘Although she finished the course she never actually enjoyed the role. She felt trapped by qualifications and experience.

‘Leona struggled with shifts she was given and found it difficult to maintain a social life around them.

The NHS mental health nurse was rated ‘outstanding’ by her colleagues but was struggling with the pressures of her demanding schedule and new role after receiving a promotion

 

‘She was saving money for a house deposit and she was looking for a home she wanted to live in but didn’t find anything and it was difficult for her to carry out her search because of shifts she was assigned to.

‘Over the years we had a few conversations and when she felt at her worst she would make flippant jokes about pills and wine being her way out.’

A doctor’s reporter was read to the hearing which said that Miss Goddard had been to see her GP in the weeks leading up to her death.

She said she felt ‘unsupported’ and ‘had nightmares about work’ and was offered anti depressants but she refused saying if work ‘got sorted out she would feel better.’

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Claire Hilton, a ward manager at Prestwich hospital, pictured, said: ‘Leona was promoted to senior staff nurse in June 2018. She was really valued. We have nothing but fond memories’

 

Ms Goddard’s ex-boyfriend Peter Schaffer, who ended their relationship a week before her death, also spoke at the inquest.

He said: ‘Leona had a wish to have children one day and start a family of her own and no doubt she would have been a great mother.

‘But when she was working for the NHS, there was changing shift patterns and she felt frustration at the unpredictability of shifts.

‘A new position was offered to give her new skills and responsibilities. She did want to stay in mental health and the NHS, but in a capacity that would give her more of a social life.

‘The only reason she stayed in the job that was not healthy for her was a light at the end of the tunnel. There were many difficulties when she started in the new position and she was left increasing amount of responsibilities, workload, absence of training – and not long after she was signed off work.

‘We had long conversations to try to help her to find other opportunities but over the weeks communication was deteriorating and I ended the relationship.

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Ms Goddard had visited her GP before her death and revealed  she felt ‘unsupported’ and ‘had nightmares about work’

 

‘She was upset and my intention was to give her space and then have a conversation about it. But tragically she took her own life a week later and that never materialised.’

Claire Hilton, a ward manager in charge of drug and alcohol issues at Prestwich hospital said: ‘Leona started in June 2016 and was promoted to senior staff nurse in June 2018.

‘She was very capable and on August 16 and 17 performed as the duty manager. It was a very challenging time and we did speak after this.

‘Both of us felt she was struggling in a lack of confidence in her own capabilities – although it was not justified. She was more than capable.

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‘On September 7, I received a call from Leona that she had seen her GP. Her mood was low and she was feeling anxious she was signed off for two weeks.

‘She phoned in September 20 but was not ready to come back and I anticipated another sick note. On the Monday I got a text asking if I was working and if free to meet that day.

‘She said she felt low and had not been out of bed for a week beforehand. Her death was a shock for colleagues and patients.

‘She was really valued, rated as outstanding and we had started a memory book with pictures and recollections for her family. We have nothing but fond memories for Leona.’

While work colleague Sianne Donovan said: ‘Leona’s job pattern and shifts were a big factor in her unhappiness even before she got the promotion.

‘She definitely felt unsupported and many times I told her to leave and find something else. She was looking for other jobs when she called me and was signed off when she definitely needed some rest.

‘When Leona split with her boyfriend had never heard her so upset. I encouraged her to get some air but she didn’t want anybody to see her crying.’

Leona’s mother Corrine Goodridge said: ‘The job at Prestwich involved her treating patients with drug and alcohol issues.

‘She got a promotion six months before her death but I think she was in two minds about it and I was not sure she was feeling positive about it.

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Recording a conclusion of suicide coroner Angharad Davis said it was ‘absolutely tragic’ that Leona, pictured, ‘didn’t recognise what a wonderful person she was’

 

‘The shift work in particular got her down as she did a 12 hour shift. Leona had not had any long term steady relationship and the most recent one ended by text message.

‘Despite the fact Leona might have been stressed at work none of us fully realised she was feeling depressed and sad. Her death has affected the whole family deeply all miss her, asking why this happened.’

Police coroners officer Marie Logan said: ‘Sadly Leona seems to have been suffering from low self esteem and depression and had been off sick at work.

‘She had difficulties coping with her recent promotion she had but these feelings were born out of her – rather than by other people.

‘She was seen as very much a clever, caring and very competent nurse and her colleagues felt the promotions as justified as she was more than capable.

‘Leona’s feelings were entirely about herself. The note she left indicated depression and low mood and things she felt she needed to do to get her life on track.

Recording a conclusion of suicide coroner Angharad Davis said: ‘Leona worked as a nurse in alcohol rehabilitation and recently been promoted to team manager.

‘Colleagues describe her as a bright, clever, caring nurse but it is clear from the evidence that the job role was causing Leona stress because of the difficulties working and the stress of the job itself.

‘Also Leona did not share the same views of herself as the colleagues had of her.

‘Have considered all the evidence read and heard it seems that Leona was under a great deal of stress going on for a long time. She had very low self esteem and did not recognise in herself the person that everybody else saw.

‘She was a young women who made a career helping people who were in trouble. It’s absolutely tragic that she didn’t recognise what a wonderful person she was.’

For confidential support call the Samaritans on 116123 or visit a local Samaritans branch, see http://www.samaritans.org for details. 

 

Disturbing video shows mom dunking baby’s head under water

SPALDING COUNTY, Ga. – A 5-month-old girl is OK after police said her mother recorded herself plunging the baby’s head underwater.

Laquanda Mosley faces charges including aggravated assault with intent to murder, first-degree child cruelty and terroristic threats after police said she recorded a video of herself holding her baby underwater.

Channel 2’s Tom Jones tracked down the child’s father, who said he believes anger drove her actions.

“That was a vindictive act,” Kevin Dandridge said.

Dandridge said Mosley became upset and threatened to harm the child when he asked for custody. He said Mosley was angry at him and sent him the videos threatening to kill the child in retaliation.

He posted it on social media and it went viral. Dandridge, who lives out of state, said he posted it for one reason only.

“I just needed some help and I didn’t know how to locate her,” he explained.

He says a friend of Mosley’s saw his post and told him where she lives, and that’s how police found her.

Officers said the infant was taken to the hospital and was released.

Dandridge told Jones no father should have to see his child’s life threatened like that.

“I guess she just went off the deep end. I don’t understand,” he said.

Dandridge said Mosley was angry with him over money and the fact that he wanted custody of his child.

Police said when they arrived here at her home she had the baby and her 5- and 7-year-old children.

All the children in in the custody of child protective services.

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Disturbed man allegedly killed ‘weird’ family who took him in!

ows_152415344551150William L. Hillman

A 21-year-old man fatally beat a mother and son who let him live in their rural Minnesota home, and the suspect offered no explanation to authorities other than his victims were “weird,” according to murder charges filed Thursday.

William L. Hillman, who has a history of mental illness and violence, was charged in Otter Tail County District Court with two counts of second-degree murder in the deaths of Denise McFadzen, 42, and Dalton McFadzen, 21. Hillman appeared in court Thursday and remains jailed.

Another son alerted the Sheriff’s Office to the attacks, and a deputy and a Perham police officer located their bodies about 5:15 a.m. Tuesday in the home off a long gravel road in Gorman Township, roughly 8 miles north of Perham.

Court records in nearby Cass County show that Hillman was ruled mentally ill in June 2016, soon after he punched his mother and threatened to kill her. He was committed to the Minnesota Security Hospital at St. Peter for treatment. That commitment ended in November 2017.

A psychologist’s evaluation leading up to the ruling concluded that Hillman was suffering from a “thought disorder” that hindered his ability to recognize reality. “He does pose a substantial likelihood of physical harm to others,” Dr. Charles Chmielewski wrote in his assessment.

1adouble041918Dalton McFadzen, 21, and Denise McFadzen, 42, were victims of “homicidal violence” Tuesday in a rural home near Perham, Minn., according to the Otter Tail County Sheriff’s Office.

According to the criminal complaint:

Denise McFadzen’s body was outside the entrance to the home, while her son’s body was in a bed. They had been beaten on the head with a large pipe wrench, which was located leaning on a wall and covered in blood, the document read.

Within moments of law enforcement learning of the killings, Hillman called 911 from a home down the road and said he had done a “bad thing” and should be arrested.

Under questioning and in bloodstained clothes, Hillman said he moved in with the McFadzens about six weeks earlier. The night before the killings, Hillman continued, he woke up in the middle of the night and doesn’t remember what happened next because everything went black.

An officer asked Hillman whether the McFadzens had ever threatened him, “and he said they had not,” the charges read. “He said they were just ‘weird.’ ”

He went on to say, “I’m sorry. I’m sorry I did it.”

Hillman also disclosed that he had hit his mother about two years earlier in Cass County, where he lived at the time. He was charged with a felony, but that case was dismissed based on mental illness, leading to his commitment to St. Peter for schizophrenia.

He said he was on medication for his illness “but stopped taking it five months ago,” about the time his commitment ended.

An online fundraising page is seeking contributions to pay for the victims’ funeral services and burial.

“Two people’s lives were senselessly taken by another individual,” campaign organizer Krystle Schwartz wrote. “They were the kindest, caring, loving people you would meet. They were kind enough to let someone in their lives without knowing the end result.”

Schwartz said Denise McFadzen leaves behind a husband of 20 years and other children.

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