Marijuana left in washing machine causes fight in Florida

Ashley Perkins, 30. (Credit: Santa Rosa County Jail)

 

Marijuana left in washing machine causes fight in Florida

Florida authorities say a Louisiana woman beat her wife with a bedpost, apparently upset her spouse put their marijuana through a washing machine.

The Pensacola News Journal reports that 30-year-old Ashley Perkins of Youngsville, Louisiana, was released from jail Thursday after being charged with aggravated battery.

The Santa Rosa County Sheriff’s Office said Perkins and her wife were arguing over missing marijuana when the fight escalated. Investigators say Perkins began hitting her wife with a bedpost around her head, legs and left arm.

Perkins told investigators her wife beat herself with the bedpost. Jail records didn’t list a lawyer or contact information for Perkins.

The couple was in the area visiting relatives.

 

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Kamala Harris’s Dad Calls Her Out for Perpetuating Pot-Smoking Jamaicans Stereotype

Kamala Harris’s father is chastising his daughter and Democrat presidential hopeful for advancing stereotypes about pot-smoking Jamaicans.

Harris’s father Donald Harris is Jamaican, and her mother Shyamala Gopalan Harris is Indian. Kamala made remarks about pot and her own use of the drug during an interviewon the New York Breakfast Club radio show.

The host told Harris some have claimed she opposes the legalization of pot.

Harris said that was not true and added: “And look, I joke about it — half-joking — half my family’s from Jamaica. Are you kidding me?”

The host asked Harris if she had ever smoked it.

“I have,” she replied.

Harris’s father was not pleased with his daughter’s remarks and issued a statement published on the Jamaica Global website.

Harris wrote:

My dear departed grandmothers (whose extraordinary legacy I described in a recent essay on this website), as well as my deceased parents, must be turning in their grave right now to see their family’s name, reputation and proud Jamaican identity being connected, in any way, jokingly or not with the fraudulent stereotype of a pot-smoking joy seeker and in the pursuit of identity politics. Speaking for myself and my immediate Jamaican family, we wish to categorically dissociate ourselves from this travesty.

The Jamaican Global website reported:

The 2020 presidential hopeful with a Jamaican heritage said she not only smoked but added “I inhale.” Perhaps said jokingly at first in the spirit of the interview, she proceeded to suggest that her Jamaican father’s side of the family would be disappointed in her if she did not support the legalization of marijuana. And that IS a serious statement. Now Harris’ father has come out vigorously dissociating himself from his daughter’s statement.

An ironic twist in Ms. Harris’ associating marijuana smoking with her Jamaican heritage that seems to have escaped her as well as media watchers is the fact that it is also very much a part of her Indian heritage that she is so proud of claiming. Is she aware that it was India that bequeathed a marijuana culture to Jamaica?

While Harris mainly praises her mother when recounting her journey to a presidential campaign, a poignant essay written by her father explains the importance of his role in Harris and her sister Maya’s lives.

He wrote an essay about Harris’s Jamaican roots that said, in part:

In their early years, I tried to convey this message in very concrete terms, through frequent visits to Jamaica and engaging life there in all its richness and complexity. In Brown’s Town, we walked the streets during ‘market day’, chatted up the ‘higglers’ in the market and were rewarded with plenty of ‘brawta’ (Jamaican word for bonus offerings) in naseberries, mangoes and guinep after each purchase.  We checked out the location of the old Park School which had become transformed into Brown’s Town Comprehensive High School, strolled into St. Mark’s Church and graveyard, and traversed the road up the hill to Orange Hill where my uncle Newton had taken over the family property and started a limestone mining and brick producing operation in addition to the cattle, grass, fruit and pimento farming of earlier times.

This early phase of interaction with my children came to an abrupt halt in 1972 when, after a hard-fought custody battle in the family court of Oakland, California, the context of the relationship was placed within arbitrary limits imposed by a court-ordered divorce settlement based on the false assumption by the State of California that fathers cannot handle parenting (especially in the case of this father, “a neegroe [sic] from da eyelans” [sic] was the Yankee stereotype, who might just end up eating his children for breakfast!).  Nevertheless, I persisted, never giving up on my love for my children or reneging on my responsibilities as their father.

Donald Harris is a professor of economics emeritus at Stanford University.

“If Kamala Harris inherits some of ‘that deep social awareness’ and heeds the advice of her Jamaican father, she will make an excellent President of the United States of America,” the article concludes.

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Sen. Charles Schumer introduces measure to decriminalize marijuana!

Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer (D-N.Y.) on Friday introduced legislation to decriminalize marijuana. (Mark Wilson / Getty Images)

The Senate’s top Democrat announced Friday that he is introducing legislation to decriminalize marijuana, the first time that a leader of either party in Congress has endorsed a rollback of one of the country’s oldest drug laws.

Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer (D-N.Y.) in a statement called the move “simply the right thing to do.”

“The time has come to decriminalize marijuana,” Schumer said. “My thinking — as well as the general population’s views — on the issue has evolved, and so I believe there’s no better time than the present to get this done. It’s simply the right thing to do.”

Schumer first shared his intentions Thursday in an interview with Vice News, in which he decried the negative effects of current marijuana laws, under which the drug has the same legal classification as heroin. He said that too many people caught with small amounts of marijuana had spent too much time in jail and that current laws have had a disproportionate effect on minority communities.

Marijuana legalization, which spent years as a fringe political cause, has become increasingly popular with all voters and increasingly embraced by Democrats. In January, the Pew Research Center found 61% of Americans supportive of legalization, with support reaching 70% among millennials.

Last year, Sen. Cory Booker (D-N.J.), who is seen by many Democrats as a potential presidential candidate in 2020, introduced the Marijuana Justice Act, which would legalize the drug nationwide; it later was endorsed by Sen. Ron Wyden (D-Ore.), whose state legalized marijuana in 2015, and Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand (D-N.Y.), who also is seen as a potential presidential contender. Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.), who endorsed a marijuana-legalization initiative in California during his 2016 presidential campaign, endorsed Booker’s bill Thursday morning.

Schumer is introducing separate legislation on Friday — a date that is an unofficial holiday for marijuana users. His bill would not legalize marijuana outright, but instead allow states to decide whether to make the drug available commercially. It would end the limbo that marijuana sellers find themselves in, months after Atty. Gen. Jeff Sessions rescinded Obama-era guidance that prevented federal law enforcement officials from interfering with the marijuana business in states where it had legal status.

“The bill lets the states decide and be the laboratories that they ought to be,” Schumer said. “It also will ensure that minority- and woman-owned businesses have a dedicated funding stream to help them compete against bigger companies in the marijuana business. Critically, we ensure that advertising can’t be aimed at kids, and put real funds behind research into the health effects of THC,” referring to the primary psychoactive substance in marijuana.

The legislation also would maintain federal authority to regulate marijuana advertising in the same way it does alcohol and tobacco advertising. The aim, Schumer said, is to ensure that marijuana businesses aren’t allowed to target children in their advertisements.

Schumer’s move was quickly celebrated by legalization supporters, who began the week by thanking Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) for fast-tracking a bill that would legalize industrial hemp.

“In the past week or so, we’ve seen an unprecedented escalation of political support for marijuana law reform,” said Tom Angell, chairman of Marijuana Majority. “It seems as if both parties may have finally realized just how popular marijuana legalization is with voters and are afraid of the other party stealing the issue.”

Democrats see the Schumer bill as part of an ongoing effort to attract young voters, who tend not to participate in midterm elections. Schumer also has gotten behind a campaign to restore “net neutrality,” regulation that would prevent internet service providers from skewing the prices or download speeds for certain kinds of data.

“The time for decriminalization has come, and I hope we can move the ball forward on this,” Schumer said.

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Florida woman blames cocaine in purse on windy day!

‘It must have flown through the window and into my purse,’ Kennecia Wells says.

FORT PIERCE, Fla. – A Florida woman who was arrested last month on drug possession charges blamed the cocaine found in her purse on the wind.

Kennecia Posey, 26, was one of two passengers in a car that was swerving in the roadway when it was stopped by Fort Pierce police March 21.

According to the police report, an officer approached the car and smelled an odor of marijuana coming from inside.

During a search of the car, the officer found cocaine and marijuana in separate bags inside a purse that Posey had on her lap.

When questioned about the drugs, Posey admitted that the marijuana was hers, police said. The cocaine was a different story.

“I don’t know anything about any cocaine,” Posey said, according to the report. “It’s a windy day. It must have flown through the window and into my purse.”

Posey was booked into the county jail on one felony count of cocaine possession and a misdemeanor count of marijuana possession. She was later released on bond.

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