The Enduring, Intergalactic Cool of Billy Dee Williams

As the legendary actor returns to Star Wars, he talks about his masculine and feminine sides, the legacy of Lando, and how after 82 years he’s never lost his style.

1-1574706774

Billy Dee Williams’s guide to being cool involves one simple step: “Be yourself.” He tells me this while sipping a Tito’s vodka neat with a little bit of Emergen-C sprinkled into it (a perhaps healthier choice than the Colt 45 with which he will be eternally associated after a string of ads for the drink in the ’80s). “I never tried to be anything except myself. I think of myself as a relatively colorful character who doesn’t take himself or herself too seriously.”

That’s a humble way of putting it. For nearly half a century, he’s been one of the coolest actors ever to appear onscreen. As Lando Calrissian, the suave, cape-wearing hero of the Star Wars universe, he’s immortalized as the quintessential figure of intergalactic chic. But beyond the sci-fi saga that has captivated generations, he’s a prolific actor and artist—he even designs his own clothes, showing up to our early-October photo shoot in a beautiful brown belted overcoat he made himself. When he starts telling me about what it takes to be cool, we’re at the beginning of our interview at the Russian Tea Room in midtown Manhattan. He’s already had a long day of graciously appeasing legions of fans at New York Comic Con. Williams hasn’t been to the restaurant in “a hundred years,” he says, but it was a regular haunt of his as a 20-something Broadway actor. (He lived a few blocks away before moving to California in 1971.)

The place hasn’t changed much since then; his favorite dish, the chicken Kiev, is still on the menu. In fact, he was so excited about this dish that we called the restaurant beforehand to make sure they could still make it. And, of course, I order it, too, because if Williams says you try the chicken Kiev, only a fool wouldn’t order the chicken Kiev. Over the course of our nearly-four hours of drinking and eating, we have more vodka, a bottle of red picked by Williams, caviar, a cheese plate, and a boozy dessert. Williams knows how to entertain. He knows how to eat. And he certainly knows how to drink. Sitting to my left in a plush, red booth, he seems like he runs the place, like it’s one of Lando’s regular joints in a far off galaxy. He’s kind to the fawning restaurant staff. And, when a group comes in, wearing what appears to be attire from a wedding or a formal party, Williams notes—always with an eye for style—that they look chic. Some of the paintings that’ve inspired his own artwork cover almost every inch of the green walls—like the Tamara de Lempicka portrait of a woman reclining opposite us. Williams grew up about 50 blocks north of here, on the edge of Harlem, where he learned what it meant to be cool from the guys on the streets who had “a little more smoothness about them.” After first appearing on Broadway as a boy, he went to school for painting, something he’s done regularly and to much acclaim throughout his acting career. Though, he admits, he doesn’t paint as much as he should these days.

What haven’t diminished at age 82 are his style, his confidence, and his effortless charm. In a simple tan button-up, with his hair slicked back, Williams continues his analysis of cool: “And you see I say ‘himself’ and ‘herself,’ because I also see myself as feminine as well as masculine. I’m a very soft person. I’m not afraid to show that side of myself.”

When I point out that Donald Glover talked about that type of gender fluidity when playing a young Lando in 2018’s Solo, Williams lights up. “Really? That kid is brilliant—just look at those videos,” he says, referencing Glover’s “This Is America” (as Childish Gambino).

2-1574706958

Although he will forever be known as Lando, Williams is proudest of his Emmy-nominated performance as Gale Sayers in the 1971 TV movie Brian’s Song. “It was a love story, really. Between two guys. Without sex. It ended up being a kind of breakthrough in terms of racial division,” he tells me. The same could be said about his portrayal of Lando in 1980’s The Empire Strikes Back, which marked the inclusion of a complex black character in a genre that was—and remains—notoriously white. In fact, over the summer, when he was at Disney’s D23 Expo in support of the upcoming Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker (for which he is reprising his iconic role), he hung out with the Rock and Jamie Foxx, both of whom said their careers are indebted to Lando. “The Rock calls me the OG,” Williams says. “What I presented on that screen people didn’t expect to see. And I deliberately presented something that nobody had experienced before: a romantic brown-skinned boy.”

J. J. Abrams, who is directing the conclusion to the Skywalker saga, told me via email that Williams’s charisma and charm are unmatched. While Abrams says he can’t begin to imagine what it must have been like for people of color to see a character like Lando onscreen in 1980, he recognizes Williams’s place in film history. “Lando was always written as a complex, contradictory, nuanced character. And Billy Dee played him to suave perfection,” Abrams says. “It wasn’t just that people of color were seeing themselves represented; they were seeing themselves represented in a rich, wonderful, intriguing way. Also, he has the best smile in Hollywood.”

3-1574706985

Before he was even cast, Williams was a fan of George Lucas, beginning with 1971’s THX 1138. And director Irvin Kershner thought the actor had the right style for Lando, so Williams didn’t even have to audition for Empire. “He knew I could pull off someone who was likable and charming. The most interesting characters are those who are dubious . . . but you want the audience to really fall in love with them,” Williams tells me. (For the record, he understands why Lando had to double-cross Han and Leia. “He was up against Darth Vader. I don’t blame him for what he did.”) Kershner went to Williams’s house to persuade him to be in the film; it didn’t take much, the actor says, to get him to appear in one of the most anticipated sequels of all time. On set, he befriended costars Carrie Fisher (who he says had a brilliant mind) and Harrison Ford (whom he still considers a dear friend), and he avoided workplace gossip. “As far as I’m concerned, I mean, I don’t care what people are—if they’re fucking each other and they’re sucking each other, whatever they’re doing, that’s fine with me. I don’t care,” he says of Fisher and Ford’s romance, as described in her memoir.

If they’re fucking each other and they’re sucking each other …that’s fine with me.

Now, for the first time since 1983’s Return of the Jedi, he’ll play Lando once again. Between Jedi and the events of the new trilogy, Williams says, “I always imagined Lando being like Steve Wynn, running Las Vegas. Because he’s a gambler. But he was a bit of a showman, a bit of an entrepreneur. That’s how I see Lando. I never necessarily saw him as a general running around shooting things.”

We don’t know exactly what’s behind Lando’s return to the franchise, but trailers show the hero back in the cockpit of the Millennium Falcon. Stepping onto that set again, Williams says, was cool—but also work. “You’re bringing something that helps move the vision that the director or producer or writer is looking for. I’m there not only for myself, but I’m there to help them bring their project to life in a way that they’re looking for.”

He admired the atmosphere Abrams (or the young mogul, as Williams calls him) created on set. “At the end of the day, there’s music that’s turned on. Everybody’s dancing and singing,” Williams says, reminding me that he once played himself in an episode of Lost. His only worry in returning to the iconic character was that he still had the fire to bring a powerful performance to the conclusion of the saga, “Do I have that same hunger, excitement, that I had years earlier?,” Williams asked himself. “This is a very difficult time for me, as far as age is concerned. When you get to be a certain age, whether you want to think about mortality or not, you think about it.”

When our food finally comes, Williams takes a bite of the chicken Kiev he remembered so fondly from his younger days, and makes a comment that could work as a good thesis statement for our entire conversation, or the nature of nostalgia like Star Wars taking hold of this moment in popular culture: “An original moment is tricky. Because you’re really trying to recall or remember your palate, your sensibility, trying to recapture something that happened a long time ago,” he tells me. “And when you anticipate it, you think you’re going to be in that moment. I’m right at that moment. So what I’m tasting is not that moment. I’m tasting this moment. And I’m happy about this moment but it’s not what I remember.”

In preparation for his return to Star Wars, Williams went on a strict healthy diet, and shared videos of himself training in a boxing gym. “When I have to go to work, my ego tells me I want to look pretty good. I don’t want to look bad. I don’t want to look like a slob,” he says, even though none of these have been adjectives ever associated with Billy Dee Williams. But, he hopes the videos of himself training serve as a reminder that people his age are capable of taking care of themselves, that there’s a way to go through later years of life happy and healthy.

Having built his career playing pivotal examples of TV and film diversity, Williams is well aware of what the new trilogy’s young leads went through—namely, racism and sexism from online trolls—when they were launched into the spotlight. “You’re always going to have people making stupid comments,” he says. “One deals with indignities all the time. Do you sit around with vengeance in your soul? You can’t do that. I’m not forcing people to listen to my point of view, but if I can present it in some creative fashion—I’m the painter, tweaking, adding, contributing, putting in something that you haven’t thought about, maybe.”

Thinking about struggles in the world around him, Williams mentions his encounter with Donald Trump at an event in the ’80s: “He was very charming. And very good at being charming. You know the story of Narcissus? Who looked at himself in the water, fell in love with himself, and then fell in and drowned? I mean, this might be one of those kinds of things.”

As for what’s next, Williams is writing a memoir. And he also has a collection of 300 paintings that he says is his legacy.

gettyimages-110775891-1574718628

So is this the end of Lando? Williams says he doesn’t know exactly how the story ends for his hero. He loved the scripts he read, he’s proud of the work he did, but, “another thing about movies, there’s a lot of editing and cutting,” he says, laughing as he eats a cup of passion-fruit sorbet with a shot of vodka poured on top. For me: a double espresso with Grand Marnier that he insisted I try (I didn’t sleep that night).

By this time, we’re both warm from the hours of drinking—I’m astonished I was able to keep up with Billy Dee Williams, even if he’s 82 years old. And before he says goodbye, he wants to sign one more autograph in a long day of doing just that. He realizes that during the shoot and convention, where everyone was clamoring for his name, written by his own hand on a piece of paper, I never asked for one. That’s not my style, I tell him, this dinner and story is memento enough. He grabs my notebook that I haven’t opened once during dinner, signs his name with the note, “Nothing but the truth.” And he gives me a hug.

Back to the question at hand though: Is this the end for Lando Calrissian? Williams has an answer in his own wry way.

“It’s a conclusion—certainly it depends on how much money is generated. That’s when they determine where’s the conclusion,” he says with a wink. “The one thing about show business, you can resurrect anything.”

New Report: 23 percent of young Black women now identify as bisexual

Attendees seen at LA Pride 2019 on June 08, 2019 in West Hollywood, California.

 

Since 1972, social scientists have studied the General Social Survey to chart the complexities of social change in the United States. 

The survey, which is conducted every couple years, asks respondents their attitudes on topics ranging from race relations to drug use. In 2008, the survey started including a question on sexual identity. 

As sociologists who study sexuality, we’ve noticed how more and more women are reporting that they’re bisexual. But in the most recent survey, one subset stood out: 23% of black women in the 18 to 34 age group identified as bisexual – a proportion that’s nearly three times higher than it was a decade ago.

What forces might be fueling this shift? And what can learn from it?

Bisexuality among women is on the rise

In the 10 years that the General Social Survey has included a question on sexual identity, rates of identification among gay men, lesbian women and bisexual men in the U.S. haven’t changed much.

Bisexual identifying women, on the other hand, account for virtually all of the growth among those who say they’re lesbian, gay or bisexual. Of all of the women who responded to the 2018 survey, more than 1 in 18 identified as bisexual. One decade ago, only 1 in 65 did.

The most dramatic shift among bisexual identifying women is happening among young people. In the 2018 sample, more than 1 in 8 women from the ages of 18 to 34 identified as bisexual. There were more than twice as many young female bisexuals as there were young lesbians, gay men and bisexual men combined.

Women who identify as bisexual by age group

Since 2008, an increasing proportion of U.S. women ages 18 to 34 identify as bisexual.

img_1680

That’s a large shift – and it all happened in a relatively short period of time.

Add race to the figures and you’ll see that young black women, in particular, account for a disproportionate share of this shift.

A few years ago, we wrote about how approximately 18% of young black women identified as lesbian or bisexual in the 2016 General Social Survey sample. That rate was more than two times higher than for white women or other racial groups – and almost four times higher than for men of any racial group.

By 2018, more than 25% of young black women identified as lesbian or bisexual. And the majority of that change can be accounted for by bisexual-identifying black women.

Proportion of young women identifying as lesbian or bisexual by race

Young black women are leading the shift toward identifying as bisexual.

img_1681

In other trends, black women also led the way

Data like these help us to establish a shift is occurring, but they don’t really explain why it’s happening. 

Exploring the “why” requires different methods of analysis, and existing studies – like Mignon Moore’s research on gay identity and relationships among black women– can provide some clues.

But beyond this, other demographic research shows that black women have led the way in other trends related to gender.

Consider the gender gap in college attendance. As early as 1980, black women began to outpace black men in completion of a four-year college degree. It wasn’t until a decade later that white women started earning college degrees at a higher clip than white men.

And in the first half of the 20th century, more unmarried black women started having children. Eventually, more unmarried white women started having children, too.

Perhaps when it comes to sexuality, black women are also ahead of the curve. If that’s the case – and if this trend continues – we might expect women of other races to follow suit.

A shortage of men?

Cultural forces might also play a role.

Sociologists Emma Mishel, Paula England, Jessie Ford and Mónica L. Caudillo also analyzed the General Social Survey. Rather than study sexual identities, they studied sexual behavior. Yet they discovered a similar pattern: Young black women were more likely to engage in same-sex sexual behavior than women and men in other racial and age groups. 

They argue that these shifts speak to a larger truth about American culture: It’s more acceptable for women to spurn gender norms because femininity isn’t valued as highly as masculinity. Since masculinity and heterosexuality are closely intertwined, men might believe they’ll suffer a higher social cost for identifying as bisexual.

Others have pointed to the shortage of men hypothesis to explore young black women’s decisions about relationships and marriage. This too might explain why young black women, in particular, seem more willing to explore bisexuality. 

According to this argument, fewer “marriageable” men create a need for women to consider options beyond heterosexual relationships or marriage. A traditional marriage isn’t as necessary as it once was; since women have more educational and economic opportunities, they can afford to be pickier or, possibly, to explore same-sex relationships. 

Another aspect of the hypothesis involves the disproportionately high rates of incarceration of black men in the U.S. It’s possible that because black women are, as a group, more likely to live in areas with smaller “pools of marriageable men,” they’re more open to bisexuality.

We’re less convinced by the shortage of men argument because it ignores the fact that incarceration rates of black men haven’t increased over the past decade. Yet over this period of time, the percentages of young black women identifying as bisexual have grown substantially.

The challenge of surveying sexuality

Finding reliable ways of measuring sexual identity on surveys is more difficult than you might think, and the trend could have been spurred by something as simple as the way the question is phrased in the General Social Survey:

“Which of the following best describes you?”

  • gay, lesbian or homosexual
  • bisexual
  • heterosexual or straight
  • don’t know

Of the roughly 1,400 people who responded to this question on the 2018 GSS survey, only six responded “don’t know.” Another 27 didn’t respond at all.

But everyone else selected one of those three options. 

Perhaps some respondents didn’t want to neatly tie themselves to the category of “gay” or “straight.” If this is the case, “bisexual” almost becomes a default fallback. 

Either way, one thing seems clear: Young people – especially young black women – are more willing to explore their sexuality. And the ways they are sexually identifying themselves on surveys is only one indicator of this change.The Conversation

By Tristan Bridges, Assistant Professor, Sociology, University of California, Santa Barbara and Mignon R. Moore, Professor and Chair of Sociology, Barnard College

This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

 

Alabama Teen Nigel Shelby Died by Suicide After Being Bullied

nigelshelbyx750_outThe 15-year-old took his own life after being the target of homophobic bullying from peers.

 

15-year-old Alabama high school student Nigel Shelby took his own life last Friday after being targeted by bullies for being gay.

“We were saddened to learn this morning of the death of Nigel Shelby, one of our 9th grade students. Our thoughts and prayers are with the family during this difficult time,” Aaron King, the principal of Huntsville High School, where Nigel attended, said in a statement on Facebook.

“We are heartbroken over the death of Nigel Shelby, a 15 year old freshman at Huntsville High School,” Huntsville’s local LGBT organization Rocket City Pride said in another statement. “Nigel took his life because he was bullied for being gay. There are no words that can be said to make sense of this devastating news.”
57306091_2201447773504918_6878341458269569024_n

We are heartbroken over the death of Nigel Shelby, a 15 year old Freshman at Huntsville High School. Nigel took his life because he was bullied for being gay. There are no words that can be said to make sense of this devastating news.
Below is a link to a GoFundMe account to help his mother with his funeral expenses. We will also be collecting donations at Huntsville’s Only Drag Brunch on Sunday and at Drag Queen Bingo on Tuesday.
Please donate what you can to help.
https://www.gofundme.com/k2h35t-nigel

If you or anyone you know need any help, there are resources available for you. CARE Services, Inc. hosts a weekly youth group of LGBT+ teens on Tuesday. GLSEN Greater Huntsville is providing resources and training for schools to support our LGBT+ students. The Trevor Project provides crisis intervention and suicide prevention services to LGBT+ youth.

A GoFundMe campaign has been started to help Nigel’s family cover the costs of funeral expenses, and at the time of reporting, over $16,000+ (of a $26,000 goal) has been raised.

If you are a trans or gender-nonconforming person considering suicide, Trans Lifeline can be reached at (877) 565-8860. LGBTQ youth (ages 24 and younger) can reach the Trevor Project Lifeline at (866) 488-7386. The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at (800) 273-8255 can also be reached 24 hours a day by people of all ages and identities.

 

Share or comment on this article:

Don Lemon’s boyfriend implied ‘liberal’ CNN star went easy on pal Avenatti!!

CNN host Don Lemon has been dating Tim Malone since 2017, according to published reports. (Sipa USA)

Don Lemon’s boyfriend told a reporter the CNN star gave Stormy Daniels’ attorney the kid-glove treatment in a Monday interview that followed a blistering expose, and referred to the news network as “liberal media” in a baffling exchange.

Tim Malone, a media ad sales executive, made the shocking disclosures in a Twitter direct message conversation with Daily Caller reporter Joe Simonson. It came after Michael Avenatti appeared on “CNN Tonight” on the heels of a Daily Caller report on Avenatti’s shady past dealings. Lemon served up softballs, and Malone had a ready explanation.

“Malone also appears to believe that Avenatti has befriended the liberal media, but that his time as journalists’ golden boy may be running out,” Simonson wrote in an exclusive story about the strange colloquy initiated by Malone.

Prior to the appearance, Avenatti, who represents the porn star who claims to have had a fling with President Trump, had accused The Daily Caller of publishing “hit pieces.” He told Simonson’s colleague, Peter Hasson, in an email that he would sue his colleagues and the publication for defamation if they didn’t stop writing “lies and defamatory statements.”

In the Monday night interview, Lemon gently broached the issue, asking Avenatti about his threats against the conservative news site. Avenatti replied cryptically that “there is (sic) good journalists, and there is (sic) bad journalists,” during a long-winded answer in which he did not elaborate on his grievance. Lemon didn’t push back about why Avenatti felt the Daily Caller wronged him in its expose.

In the Twitter exchange that followed the interview, Simonson asked Malone if he thought Lemon erred by not pressing Avenatti.

“I guess, yeah,” Malone told Simonson, according to the reporter. “Ha, he won’t [sue]. I think it’s all a game. Who knows?”

Malone initially declined to elaborate, but then offered an explanation as to why Lemon tossed softballs to Avenatti.

“You don’t think Avenatti is smart enough to try and befriend the liberal media?” he said, according to Simonson, implying that Lemon and the attorney are friends.

Simonson says he then asked Malone how his boyfriend could be friends with Avenatti “considering his intimidation tactics against other journalists.”

According to Simonson, Malone said the media is going “way too easy” on the porn lawyer, and feels the Daily Caller has been “fair.”

“Honestly, I think it’s all a game, everyone is profiting, and doing what rates for their audience,” Malone said, according to Simonson. “People need to dig more. But they are starting.”

CNN did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

As for Simonson, when reached for comment about the bewildering interview with Malone, he issued the following statement: “I was and remain confused.”

Brian Flood covers the media for Fox News. Follow him on Twitter at @briansflood.

Please SHARE with your friends and family!

SHOCK VIDEO: Boxing Star Adrian Broner Appears . . . To KISS Boxer ‘Tank’ Davis!!

adian_joke

Boxing superstar Adrian Broner and his friend Gervontae ‘Tank’ Davis are two of the biggest names in the sport of boxing. But the two now have people talking – after a video of them in the club as leaked.

The video, which was initially posted by Adrian Broner – appears to show the two men go to KISS EACH OTHER ON THE MOUTH. Because of the  quality of the video, it’s not clear whether the two boxers LIPS TOUCHED.

Here is the video:

The video was taken while the two spent the evening at a strip club. Both men appear to have been drinking when the video was taken.

Almost immediately, fans of Adrien Broner began asking what was up with the video. Adrian told fans that he and Tank were just “playing around.”

TMZ also reports that the two men broke up a fight the same night. They said that:

Boxing champ Gervonta Davis(20-0) played peacemaker in a strip club fist fight … diving in between punches to separate two guys — and TMZ Sportshas the footage.

It all went down outside V Live Dallas — one of the top strip clubs in the country — where stars like Davis and Adrien Bronerwere partying earlier that evening. But,as Davis was leaving the club, two guys decided to throw down in the parking lot — things got violent, quick.

That’s when Davis — the reigning WBA super featherweight champ — RACED over to the melee and pushed his way in between the brawlers to try and end things asap. One of the guys definitely got hit in the face hard — but Davis essentially put a stop to the fight. V Live’s owner, Damon Cobbs, tells us no one was hurt, and he’s happy his security prevented the incident from escalating.

Please SHARE with your friends and family!

Obama’s “Gay Lover” Breaks His Silence!

A gay man’s feelings have been hurt.

Larry Sinclair says he had a drug-induced sexual affair with a married Barack Obama, and no one seems to care, while Stormy Daniels has become a household name for allegedly having sex with Donald Trump.

Sinclair revealed that he and Obama hooked up for a steamy two-day love affair back in 1999, when Obama was a member of the Illinois State Senate.

He doesn’t understand why the media is all but ignoring his affair with Obama, while at the same time focusing so much attention on Daniels, the porn star who claims she got down and dirty with Trump in 2006, not long after he had married Melania.

“Stormy Daniels is being pimped and pimping the media now and it’s lining her pockets,” Sinclair told The Washington Examiner. “I believe she had sex with him. Do I believe she’s trying to twist and add to it to benefit her interests? You’re damn right I do.”

So, why all the attention on Daniels, while all but ignoring Obama’s alleged GAY affair and drug use?

Sinclair was wondering the same:

“I find this whole double standard sickening, and no I am not a bigger supporter of Trump, but I am a supporter of fair and unbiased media coverage.”

Please SHARE with your friends and family!

Joy Reid Blames Bizarre ‘Hack’ For Homophobic Posts — And Now They’re Gone!

MSNBC’s Joy Reid claimed on Monday that homophobic content from her old blog was “fabricated” by outside sources and added to the site after she shut it down, with all the content mysteriously disappearing from internet archives.

Mediaite reported last December that Reid had posted a series of anti-gay articles on her blog, the Reid Report, and Reid offered an apology via Facebook shortly thereafter, taking full responsibility for them.

This note is my apology to all who are disappointed by the content of blogs I wrote a decade ago, for which my choice of words and tone have legitimately been criticized. As a writer, I pride myself on a facility with language — an economy of words or at least some wisdom in the selection. However, that clearly has not always been the case.

But Twitter user @Jamie_Maz recently unearthed several more of the posts, and each one appeared to be worse than the last.

Thread – 1/x Joy Reid’s homophobic blog posts were far worse than 1st reported. They also had nothing to do with Republican hypocrisy on gay marriage. Joy also opposed gay marriage at the time. She gleefully accused people of being gay and posted a number of questionable things. pic.twitter.com/ZloivXczTS — Not a bot (@Jamie_Maz) April 18, 2018

2/x Top 5 “totally not gay celebrities of the year”. Using your media platform to out people you think is gay to get clicks has nothing to do with Republicans hypocrisy on gay marriage. pic.twitter.com/0B921itHkj — Not a bot (@Jamie_Maz) April 18, 2018

3/x Joy writes that @karlrove is known as Miss Piggy in Washington DC’s gay circles. Claims he is a leader of the gay Republican mafia. Joy re-posted this “reidblog classics” at the end of the year for her readers’ enjoyment. pic.twitter.com/mFTvApK0VX — Not a bot (@Jamie_Maz) April 18, 2018

But then @Jamie_Maz noticed something even more disturbing: the links to the blog were disappearing from the internet archive site The Wayback Machine.

7/x in the last few months the site was removed from the Wayback Machine on Internet Archive at the request of whoever controls the blog, from what I understand. These screenshots were taken before it came downhttps://t.co/5bxkkYLGR6 pic.twitter.com/TFk2vv48Xk — Not a bot (@Jamie_Maz) April 18, 2018

Wow, the @internetarchive is removing documentation of @JoyAnnReid‘s homophobic slurs and insults. https://t.co/4CFH2QfRfN pic.twitter.com/S0dQj2zfaU — Ryan Saavedra (@RealSaavedra) April 24, 2018

Reid provided an updated statement to Mediaite, saying, “Now that the site has been compromised I can state unequivocally that it does not represent the original entries. I hope that whoever corrupted the site recognizes the pain they have caused, not just to me, but to my family and communities that I care deeply about: LGBTQ, immigrants, people of color and other marginalized groups.”

Think your friends would be interested? Share this story!