Viral images show people of color as anti-Asian perpetrators. Don’t believe your lying eyes, It’s really White people attacking Asians!

A new analysis reveals misconceptions about perpetrators, victims, and the general environment around anti-Asian hate incidents. These can have “long-term consequences for racial solidarity,” researcher Janelle Wong said.

Activists participate in a vigil in response to the Atlanta spa shootings March 17, 2021 in the Chinatown area of Washington, DC.Alex Wong / Getty Images

June 15, 2021, 2:47 PM EDTBy Kimmy Yam

While news reports and social media have perpetuated the idea that anti-Asian violence is committed mostly by people of color, a new analysis shows the majority of attackers are white.

Janelle Wong, a professor of American Studies at the University of Maryland, College Park, released analysis last week that drew on previously published studies on anti-Asian bias. She found official crime statistics and other studies revealed more than three-quarters of offenders of anti-Asian hate crimes and incidents, from both before and during the pandemic, have been white, contrary to many of the images circulating online.

Wong told NBC Asian America that such dangerous misconceptions about who perpetrates anti-Asian hate incidents can have “long-term consequences for racial solidarity.”

“The way that the media is covering and the way that people are understanding anti-Asian hate at this moment, in some ways, draws attention to these long-standing anti-Asian biases in U.S. society,” Wong said. “But the racist kind of tropes that come along with it — especially that it’s predominantly Black people attacking Asian Americans who are elderly — there’s not really an empirical basis in that.”

Wong examined nine sources and four types of data about anti-Asian hate incidents, including from the reporting forum Stop AAPI Hate, Pew Research, as well as official law enforcement statistics, the majority of them spanning the year and a half when the #StopAAPIHate hashtag was trending. She found major contradictions in the prevailing narrative around perpetrators, victims, and the general environment of racism toward Asian Americans during the coronavirus pandemic. She said such misleading conclusions could be attributed to the lack of context around images, the failure to amplify all aspects of the data or misinterpretations of the research.

A misread of a frequently cited study from this year, published in the American Journal of Criminal Justice, likely contributed to the spread of erroneous narratives, Wong said. The study, which examined hate crime data from 1992 to 2014, found that compared to anti-Black and anti-Latino hate crimes, a higher proportion of perpetrators of anti-Asian hate crimes were people of color. Still, 75 percent of perpetrators were white.

Other studies confirm the findings, Wong wrote. She pointed to separate research from the University of Michigan Virulent Hate Project, which examined media reports about anti-Asian incidents last year and found that upward of 75 percentof news stories identified perpetrators as male and white in instances of physical or verbal assault and harassment when the race of the perpetrator was confirmed. Wong said the numbers could even be an underestimate.

“This is really how crime is framed in the United States — it’s framed as the source is Black,” Wong said.

Karthick Ramakrishnan, founder of AAPI Data, a data and civic engagement nonprofit group, for which Wong also works, said that the public’s perception of perpetrators and victims is largely formed by the images that have been widely circulated — but that they aren’t representative of most anti-Asian bias incidents. For example, the videos that have gone viral are more likely to be from low-income, urban areas where there is more surveillance, he said.

“You have security camera videos that are more available and prevalent in certain types of urban settings. And so that’s what’s available to people in terms of sharing,” Ramakrishnan said. “The videos are more viral than if it’s something that doesn’t have any imagery or video connected to it, like something that’s happening in the suburbs, for example.”

When they are circulated, they play on a loop with no audio. Even though the videos alone don’t provide much detail about what’s happening, they dominate our perceptions, Ramakrishnan said.

“There’s just something so powerful about these visual images so that no matter what the social science might say, people believe their eyes and especially the images that get played on repeat now,” he said.

Ramakrishnan said anti-Blackness among Asian Americans and the diaspora could also affect how such images are disseminated. Often, videos that confirm prejudices are shared not only on U.S. social networks but also on international messaging apps.

“These kinds of images and narratives of racial tension — Black violence on Asian people — are getting shared in Asia, as well. There is a transnational component to it,” he said. “Whatever aspect of anti-Black racism or racial prejudice that some Asian Americans might have will also matter, in terms of what ends up being more prominent, because these go to social networks, especially through social networks apps, as well.”

Wong said many erroneous assumptions persist about the identities of victims and the types of hate incidents they have confronted. She said there’s a widely held belief that such incidents are generally violent, when studies show that most of the racism Asian Americans have faced because of the pandemic is verbal harassment or shunning. Wong said that although older Asian women are typically thought of as the victims of such crimes, research shows that about 7 percent of reported incidents have involved anyone over 60.

Wong said that while any hate crime or incident is unacceptable, the astronomical increases often reported in headlines don’t capture the full picture of anti-Asian hate. The baseline for anti-Asian hate crimes and incidents has been relatively low, meaning a small growth in the total number of hate incidents can lead to large percentage increases. For example, data indicate that the largest increase occurred in New York City, which jumped from three to 28 anti-Asian hate crimes from 2019 to 2020, about an 833 percent surge. Meanwhile, Sacramento, California, increased from one to eight anti-Asian crimes from 2019 to 2020 — a small jump in raw numbers that equates to an increase of 700 percent.

“Even in jurisdictions reporting the most dramatic year-over-year increases in hate crimes, like New York City, the rate was lower than the proportion of Asian Americans in the population,” Wong said.

Asian Americans aren’t the only racial group that has met challenges during the pandemic. Wong said official law enforcement statistics show that in the 26 largest jurisdictions, which include areas like New York City, anti-Asian hate crimes accounted for 6.3 percent of all reported hate crimes.

Black Americans have long faced higher rates of hate crimes. Even though official 2019 law enforcement data show a drop in anti-Black hate crime reports, Black people were still, by far, the most targeted racial group, Wong said. That year, 58 percent of reported hate crimes were motivated by anti-Black bias, while a far smaller proportion, 4 percent, were motivated by anti-Asian bias. About 14 percent were motivated by anti-Latino bias.

Last year, when Asian Americans dealt with coronavirus-specific stereotypes, 27 percent of Asian Americans reported having ever experienced hate crimes or incidents, while 34 percent of Black Americans did, according to an AAPI Data survey.

“People overestimate the degree to which they, individually, are likely to be the victim of the crime. And so what we’re seeing right now, because there’s so much media coverage — even though we see that Asian Americans account for, no matter how you cut it, a minority of the hate crimes in any place — they feel like they’re the most likely to be attacked,” she said.

That isn’t to say that increases haven’t occurred or that verbal harassment and such incidents aren’t of concern, Wong said. There has been a marked increase in discrimination toward Asian Americans that deserves attention. But selectively amplifying aspects of the issue or omitting context can further perpetuate dangerous stereotypes and break opportunities for solidarity among marginalized groups, she said. Ramakrishnan said that when people reach for policy solutions based on insufficient information, they may not solve the issue.

Ramakrishnan called on the media and other institutions not only to add more context to information, but also to draw responsible conclusions from the data. He also emphasized that while the media are hyperfocused on anti-Asian crimes, Asian American and Pacific Islanders deal with a vast range of issues, including language barriers and immigration struggles, which aren’t captured in coverage of pandemic racism.

“Nuance is difficult to get people to rally around and pay attention to. Sensationalism is what gets attention. But hopefully, it’s the nuance that keeps them there so they want to go deeper in their understanding,” Ramakrishnan said. “I’m hopeful that what got a lot of people to care and pay attention were these hate incidents and horrific crimes but hoping that what keeps people interested is understanding the larger set of issues that affect these American Pacific Islanders.”

WE MUST NEVER FORGET!

REPOST:
“Soooo you mean to tell me that someone down your ancestry line survived being chained to other human bodies for several months in the bottom of a disease-infested ship during the Middle Passage, lost their language, customs and traditions, picked up the English language as best they could while working free of charge from sunup to sundown as they watched babies sold from out of their arms and women raped by ruthless slave owners.

Took names with no last names, no birth certificates, no heritage of any kind, braved the Underground Railroad, survived the Civil War to enter into sharecropping… Learned to read and write out of sheer will and determination, faced the burning crosses of the KKK, everted their eyes at the black bodies swinging from ropes hung on trees… Fought in World Wars as soldiers to return to America as boys, marched in Birmingham, hosed in Selma, jailed in Wilmington, assassinated in Memphis, segregated in the South, ghettoed in the North, ignored in history books, stereotyped in Hollywood… and in spite of it all someone in your family line endured every era to make sure you would get here and you receive one rejection, face one obstacle, lose one friend, get overlooked, and you want to quit? How dare you entertain the very thought of quitting. People, you will never know survived from generation to generation so you could succeed. Don’t you dare let them down!

Give this to your young people who don’t know their history and want to get weak!

It is NOT in our DNA to quit!”

Rapper YG’s Song ‘Meet the Flockers’ Sparks Protests, Accusations of Targeting Asian Americans

Protesters are saying YG’s song “Meet the Flockers” celebrates violence against Asian Americans.

Chinese Americans gather outside Wednesday night at The Fillmore, a concert venue, in Silver Spring, Maryland, to protest a 2014 song by rapper YG called “Meet the Flockers.” Demonstrators say the song celebrates violence against Asian Americans.Courtesy of Cliff Li

Asian Americans protested Wednesday night outside a concert in Maryland, criticizing California rap artist YG for a song whose lyrics talk about burglarizing homes in Chinese neighborhoods.

“It glorifies crime against Asian Americans,” Cliff Li, one of the rally organizers, told NBC News. “We want to say it’s wrong to glorify crime against everybody.”

Holding signs that read “STOP Cultural Violence” and “Respect everybody, Respect yourself,” between 30 and 50 protesters, most of them Chinese American, gathered outside YG’s concert at The Fillmore in Silver Spring, Maryland, Li said, about six miles north of Washington, D.C.

Between 30 and 50 Chinese Americans protest outside a YG rap concert Wednesday at The Fillmore in Silver Spring, Maryland. They say YG’s “Meet the Flockers,” released in 2014, perpetuates cultural violence and glorifies crime against Asian Americans.Courtesy of Cliff Li

The controversy centers on YG’s “Meet The Flockers” and its music video, released in 2014. The lyrics, which critics say detail how to commit a burglary, begin: “First, you find a house and scope it out. Find a Chinese neighborhood, cause they don’t believe in bank accounts.”

The music video shows two armed men, with bandanas partially covering their faces, entering a house as the camera pans over to a framed photo of an Asian-American family of four.

Outrage over “Meet The Flockers” comes almost a month after a Chinese-American woman made headlines for confronting three intruders who had entered her Atlanta-area home in the middle of the night on Sept. 16.

The woman opened fire with her own handgun, and at least two armed suspects returned fire, according to NBC Atlanta affiliate 11Alive. One suspect was killed in the exchange, while two others escaped and were still at large, the news station reported. The woman was not charged.

There is no confirmation whether the incident was related to the song, but Li said it was one of the factors that led to the protests against the song.

Five days after the Atlanta incident, a White House petition was created, saying “‘Meet the Flockers’ by YG encourages violence and crimes to a specific ethnic group.” The online petition asks for the song to be banned from “public media” and for the “legal responsibilities of the writer” to be investigated.

As of Friday morning, the petition had received more than 71,000 signatures.

“Think about all the inner-city kids, think about all the kids in the United States and all over the world, if they watch this, what kind of influence will it have on these kids,” said Li, secretary general of the New Civil Rights Alliance, one of the groups that demonstrated.

Rapper YG performs onstage at Staples Center on Sept. 7, 2016 in Los Angeles.Scott Dudelson / Getty Images, file

YG did not return emails from NBC News requesting comment on the protest.

Li said demonstrators were also upset by YG and Nipsey Hussle’s “FDT” song and video, which features rappers singing the refrain “f**k Donald Trump” as people display the middle finger at the camera.

“I feel this is the wrong way to use an art form to distort a lot of facts the candidate said,” Li added.

Additional protests against the rap artists and what demonstrators called cultural violence are being planned for this weekend and next week, Li said, in cities where YG will appear for “The F**k Donald Trump Tour.”

Nail Salon Brawls & Boycotts: Unpacking The Black-Asian Conflict In America

As early as I can remember, my dad, an immigrant from Taiwan, would nonchalantly use the term 黑鬼 (hēi guǐ), Mandarin for “black ghost” and essentially the Chinese equivalent of the n-word, to refer to Black people.

From a young age, I understood that the racial discrimination perpetuated against Black people in this country was mirrored in the sentiments of members of my community — a community that also faces intolerance in this country.

There have been ways in which this racial divide has been represented by the victimization of Asians, from coverage of the 1992 Los Angeles riots to reports of targeted attacks against Asians by Black people. It could be argued that the violence is mutual, but in reality, the Asian community and Asian-owned businesses have much responsibility to bear when it comes to anti-Black violence.

PHOTO: DOUGLAS BURROWS/LIAISON. A beauty supply store set on fire during the Los Angeles Riots.

On Friday, August 3, a dispute over an eyebrow wax became physical at New Red Apple Nails on Nostrand Avenue in East Flatbush, NY. According to a report in the New York Post, customer Christina Thomas was at the nail salon with her sister and grandmother when she received an unsatisfactory eyebrow waxing and refused to pay for the service.

The staff ended up getting violent with the three Black women, with employees hitting them with broomsticks, dustpans, and their hands. A Facebook video of the brawl went viral, which led to protesters trying to shut the down the salon, as well as other Asian-owned nail salons. It also led to a movement amongst Black women to patronize Black-owned businesses.

The New York Healthy Nail Salon Coalition was quick to condemn the violence of New Red Apple Nails’ employees, stating that “at no point, is any level of violence needed or justified,” while Asian American community organizations banded together to call out our complicity to Black oppression. “White supremacy is upheld when Asian American workers who are sometimes exploited with long days and low pay may unjustly take their frustration out with Black customers,” the statement read.

PHOTO: GARY LEONARD/CORBIS/GETTY IMAGES. A row of destroyed businesses after the Los Angeles Riots.

This incident does not stand alone. In fact, there is a long history of Black-Asian conflict in America, and tensions were especially high in the early 1990s in New York and Los Angeles. In 1990, the Flatbush boycott, also known as the Family Red Apple boycott, broke out following the assault of a Haitian woman by employees of the Korean-owned grocery in Brooklyn’s predominately-Black Flatbush neighborhood.

Black protestors called for the boycott of all Korean-owned stores. In 1991, convenience store owner Soon Ja Du shot and killed 15-year-old Latasha Harlins after she wrongly accused Harlins of trying to shoplift a bottle of orange juice from her South Los Angeles store; a security camera video showed the girl had money in her hand to pay for it. Du didn’t serve any jail time.

Harlins’ death is cited as a catalyst to the 1992 Los Angeles riots, in which Korean-owned stores were targeted, looted, and destroyed. Fast-forward to March last year, when Black community members in Charlotte, NC protested Missha Beauty store after owner Sung Ho Lim was filmed choking a Black female customer he suspected of stealing. These infamous incidents have become emblematic of Black-Korean conflict, which has been widely documented and researched.

“Although ‘Black-Korean conflict’ may have largely disappeared from front page headline news, the reality of racially-distinct immigrant small business entrepreneurs operating in poor, underserved minority neighborhoods persists as a formula for potential conflict,” wrote author Miliann Kang in The Managed Hand: Race, Gender, and the Body in Beauty Service Work. “The potential for misunderstandings and dissatisfaction remains high in service exchanges involving emotional and embodied dimensions across various social divisions.”

Each publicized incident called into question the anti-Black biases of Asian immigrants and Asian Americans. But the boycotts that followed were often xenophobia-tinged retaliations, depicting a sort of tit-for-tat cycle between communities. In the protests following the August 3 incident at New Red Apple Nails, “Where’s ICE?” was heard among the chants outside of a second salon blocks away, Beautiful Red Apple Nails, according to New York Post. An employee at Beautiful Red Apple Nails told the New York Times that the two similarly-named businesses are not owned by the same people.

In 1990, the Haitian woman involved in the scuffle that began the Flatbush boycott allegedly told the cashier, “Yon Chinese, Korean motherfucker. Go back to your country,” according to a report from The New Republic. During the ensuing protests, a Black teen bashed the skull of a Vietnamese resident with a hammer, as his accomplices yelled “Koreans go home.”

These sentiments mirror the xenophobic rhetoric often experienced by non-white immigrants, and call to mind, for Asian Americans, the 1982 murder of Vincent Chin, a Chinese man who was murdered by two white men who mistook him for Japanese. People of color often adopt the same an anti-immigrant mentality and buy into the fear of Yellow Peril created by white supremacy and nationalism — systems that make everybody complicit to them, including the oppressed.

Sociologist Tamara K. Nopper argued against depicting these Black-Asian conflicts as “mutual misunderstanding” in a 2015 article. “The use of ‘mutual’ misunderstanding suggests shared status or power, with each group contributing to each other’s vulnerability and suffering,” Nopper wrote. “The employment of the mutual misunderstanding framework suggests Asian store owners desire identification with and from Black customers across class and race lines. Yet many studies of Asian immigrant storeowners show they hold racist views of Black people and associate them with negative qualities purportedly absent among Asians.”

Asian Americans must admit and rectify the ways we uphold white supremacy, namely our anti-Blackness. Much like the U.S., Asian countries suffer from colorism and caste systems within their own societies. “Anti-Blackness is foundational to the creation of America,” said Diane Wong, an assistant professor and faculty fellow at NYU Gallatin, whose research has focused on the gentrification of Chinatowns and Afro-Asian solidarities. “It’s no secret then that anti-Blackness is reflected in Asian immigrant families, businesses, institutions and interpersonal relationships on a frequent basis.”

As a society, we have “progressed” from lynchings to viral videos of violence against Black people, from police killings and brutality to baseless accusations of criminality. In retail spaces, Black people continue to experience racism and antagonization. When Asians internalize and perpetuate anti-Black racism and violence, we are reifying our complicity and driving a deeper wedge between the minority groups.

It’s important to note that two groups are not equally positioned in larger structures of power, especially when one racial group is profiting off the other, which is oftentimes the case in these violent clashes between Black people and Asians.

“Race is certainly a factor, but it is not the only factor,” Kang, an associate professor at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, said in an interview. Kang’s research has focused on Asian-owned nail salons and their racially diverse customers. “Many nail salon workers are under pressure to work quickly and keep costs down, which does not create the best environment for building customer relations.

The potential for tensions is heightened by the intimacy of the service, which involves direct physical contact, and the fact that many of the workers and owners are immigrants who do not speak the language or understand the culture of their customers.” In these scenarios, the tension is stoked by economic stress: the salon workers who often work for low wages under poor conditions, and the mostly working class clientele who cannot afford to waste money on subpar service.

Kang stressed the importance of putting these largely publicized conflicts in context. “I have observed hundreds of interactions in salons in this neighborhood that were very cordial and where workers and customers were very respectful and appreciative of each other,” she said.

Our perspectives are largely shaped by the way Black-Asian conflict is covered in media. “There is a lot of misinformation when it comes to reporting on salient issues that affect both Black and Asian communities,” Wong said. However, when videos of Asian business owners and workers inflicting violence on Black customers go viral, when Asian American activists protest in support for Peter Liang, an NYPD officer who shot an unarmed Black man in a stairwell, the message received by the public is that Asians do not care about Black lives.

These acts of violence are only a microcosm of the conflict between the minority groups, moments when the tension bubbles up to the surface and pops. There have been many ways statistics about Asian American achievement and the “model minority” myth have been used as a wedge between Asians and other minority groups, most notably through Ed Blum’s anti-affirmative action lawsuit against Harvard.

Many Asian Americans have thrown their support behind ending affirmative action and in support of standardized testing in school admission, placing their own concerns ahead of the communities marginalized by these systems, namely Black, Brown, and indigenous peoples.

As a kid, I used to cringe when my dad, a self-proclaimed Democrat, would use slurs to refer to Black people, sometimes rolling my eyes and shouting “Daddy!” at him. Now, I realize that I must do more than just cringe. It is my generation’s job to undo the legacy of anti-Black racism within our communities and to resist complicity with white supremacy — and it starts with talking about it.

CALLING IT QUITS? Ocasio-Cortez Says ‘I Don’t Even Know If I Want To Be in Politics’

“It’s the incoming. It’s the stress. It’s the violence. It’s the lack of support from your own party…”

Congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez surprised some Democrats during a recent interview with the New York Times published this week; saying she “doesn’t even know” if she “wants to be in politics” beyond her current term.

“Is there a universe in which they’re hostile enough that we’re talking about a Senate run in a couple years?” asked the New York Times.

“I genuinely don’t know. I don’t even know if I want to be in politics. You know, for real, in the first six months of my term, I didn’t even know if I was going to run for re-election this year,” said Ocasio-Cortez.

“It’s the incoming. It’s the stress. It’s the violence. It’s the lack of support from your own party. It’s your own party thinking you’re the enemy. When your own colleagues talk anonymously in the press and then turn around and say you’re bad because you actually append your name to your opinion,” she added.

“But I’m serious when I tell people the odds of me running for higher office and the odds of me just going off trying to start a homestead somewhere — they’re probably the same,” said the Congresswoman.

Read the full interview at the New York Times.

Biden campaign threatens to remove Trump from White House

“The United States government is perfectly capable of escorting trespassers out of the White House.”

The Biden campaign has plunged to a new low: threatening to remove President Trump from the White House.

Biden campaign spokesman Andrew Bates threatened to have President Trump escorted from the White House if he refuses to concede in the 2020 presidential election.

“As we said on July 19th, the American people will decide this election,” Bates said, according to Bloomberg reporter Jennfier Epstein. “And the United States government is perfectly capable of escorting trespassers out of the White House.”

Bates echoed his belief that the former vice president will be officially declared the winner, despite several key battleground states still counting votes.

Last summer, the media pressed President Trump on whether he would leave the Whie House without controversy if defeated by Joe Biden.

There was something strange about the frequency and fixation of the question then, and it’s still awfully suspicious now.

With the results still in limbo, the Trump campaign has filed lawsuits in Georgia, Michigan, Nevada and Pennsylvania, alleging voter fraud. The Georgia and Michigan suits were dismissed, but Pennsylvania granted Trump a win, allowing campaign officials to observe ballot counters, according to the Daily Caller. 

Biden, on the other hand, assured his supporters that he and his veep nominee Kamala Harris “will be declared winners” in a speech Thursday.

“Democracy is sometimes messy,” he said. “It sometimes requires a little patience as well, but that patience has been rewarded now for more than 240 years with a system of governance that’s been the envy of the world. I ask everyone to stay calm – all people to stay calm. The process is working. The count is being completed, and we’ll know very soon.”

Well, Joe. If the roles were reversed, would you be able to say the same? Not likely.

DIRTY DEMOCRATS

Controversial California Bill – How SB145 Bill is eliminating disparity and encouraging child abuse

Source: Michael Macor / The Chronicle

A controversial California bill has passed in the senate. The state is ready for eliminating disparity in its statutory rape laws. SB145 by state Senator Scott Wiener would now remove automatic sex offender registration for young adults who are convicted of having anal or oral sex with a minor. The decision would now be left to the judge. This has been said as the bill to eliminate the discrimination for the LGBTQ people in the criminal justice system.

The California bill was passed in the Assembly with 41-18 vote. It sailed through the senate with 23-10 majority as well. The bill has now been sent to Governor Gavin Newsom. He has time till September to act on it, reported San Francisco Chronicle.

Under the current penal law of California, the judge has to decide whether an offender needs to be put on the sex-offender list in case of vaginal intercourse. The law says that as it can lead to pregnancy and the offender can become father, hence he can be stigmatized. The offender might even find it difficult to get a job, hence automatic registration is not allowed. However, the same is not allowed for oral and anal sex. The offender gets auto-registered. The California Supreme Court upheld the distinction of the law in 2015.

However, under the new bill, every sexual act would be the same. Senator Scott Wiener thinks that it was long due to the LGTQB people.

However, this bill also extends to minors. The critics have come hard on it. The minor has no consent and thus this bill can further exploit them. Many have raised questions on the bill for the inclusion of minors.

The controversial bill is with the Governor now. If he approves it, this could be a new law. However, he has time till the end of this month to ponder on the details of the bill.

Green Bay Police: Antifa Member with Flamethrower Cried in Fetal Position When Caught

A suspected member of Antifa — who was allegedly armed with a flamethrower — cried in the fetal position before his arrest during a Saturday evening protest in Green Bay, Wisconsin, according to law enforcement.

WBAY Reports

Matthew Banta, 23, is charged with obstructing an officer and two counts of felony bail jumping.
The criminal complaint says Banta “is known to be a violent Antifa member who incites violence in otherwise relatively peaceful protests.” Police say he’s known as “Commander Red.”
[…]
A responding officer says he saw four individuals walking towards a protest with baseball bats. One man was wearing a metal helmet with goggles and military-style gear with multiple pouches, and was carrying an Antifa flag. When the officer pulled his squad car in front of the group, they ran away. The officer caught Banta, who was carrying the flag, and says Banta “dropped into the fetal position and began crying.”

“It’s worrisome when people associated with Antifa come here to Green Bay from out of town for the purpose of protesting here or for the purposes of committing violent acts,” said Green Bay Police Chief Andrew Smith.

“An unlawful assembly is three or more people who gather in such a manner where property damage, or personal injury is likely to occur,” Smith added. “We determined this was happening on Washington Street. What was happening was a large group of people had blocked traffic on the street had engaged in throwing a bottle at somebody, were pulling up manhole covers off the street and were blocking traffic.”

Police said 15 protesters were arrested after the demonstration was declared unlawful.

In early August, Banta was charged with biting, kicking, and pointing firearm at a police officer at a protest in Waupaca.

Rose McGowan Rips DNC, Clintons — ‘I Believe Joe Biden Is a Rapist’

#METOO, 2 WORDSFmr Democrat, Celebrity, Rape Victim, Rose McGowan: ‘I Strongly Believe Joe Biden Is A Rapist’

Rumors of Democrats partaking in unspeakable acts of sexual abuse and satanism have been circulating the blogosphere for years.    Ironically, just as news has come to light suggesting there is in fact some ‘there,’ there, (Epstein, Weinstein, Weiner, Clinton, Biden, Prince Andrew …)  the social media giants and technocracy go into overdrive banning certain groups.  Go figure.

During a press conference this past Wednesday a reporter asked President Trump about this.

Reporter: “The crux of the theory is this belief that you are secretly saving the world from this satanic cult of pedophiles and cannibals. Does that sound like something that you are behind?

President Trump refused to denounce the ‘Q’ movement.  Instead, his answer left jaws agape…

President Trump“I haven’t heard that but is that supposed to be a bad thing or a good thing?If I can help save the world from problems, I’m willing to do it. 

I’m willing to put myself out there, and we are actually. We are saving the world from the radical Left philosophy that will destroy this country, and when this country is gone, the rest of the world would follow. That’s the importance of this country.”

According to (USSANEWS.com)… The president’s comments come as Facebook conducts a large-scale purge of QAnon accounts. The social media monopolist reportedly banned 900 pages and groups and 1,500 ads while restricting the reach of over 10,000 Instagram pages and 2,000 Facebook groups related to QAnon on Wednesday.

Was Facebook committing another in kind campaign donation to Democrats with this purge, or were their intentions pure? As always, we will leave that up to you to decide. Read this tweet that Hollywood actress Rose McGowan posted yesterday.

McGowan: “I was raped by a TOP Democratic donor.”  McGowan was undoubtedly referring to Harvey Weinstein.

“Hillary Clinton shutdown NBC’s expose of HW with one phone call from her spokesperson.

“I strongly believe that Joe Biden is a rapist.” A former Secret Service agent assigned to protect the VP characterizedBiden’s depraved sexual advances as “Weinstein Level” impropriety.

DNC had Bill Clinton, serial abuser of young women (Epstein & others) speak.” Consider the allegations leveled against former President Clinton, and other Democrats, and weigh that against the media’s silence.

ABC Reporter Amy Robach:.”It was unbelievable. We had Clinton…We had everything.”

Now compare that to what you would expect from the media if that level of accusation was made against President Trump.  Imagine if Epstein had held the same compromise over high level Republicans and their donors?  Since its Democrats… crickets.

For the record, rumors circulated around Barack Obama and a homosexual tryst with a man named Larry Sinclair.  Whether those rumors are true or not, if they are it would be in keeping with the Dems’ cult-like need for compromised officials who the party can control.

McGowan:

“I know more than you will ever know about their evil.”

The list goes on… Don’t forget Anthony Weiner and his amazing disappearing laptop.

Erik Prince on the NYPD and Weiner’s laptop:

I know, and this is from a very well-placed source of mine at 1PP, One Police Plaza in New York – the NYPD wanted to do a press conference announcing the warrants and the additional arrests they were making in this investigation, and they’ve gotten huge pushback, to the point of coercion, from the Justice Department, with the Justice Department threatening to charge someone that had been unrelated in the accidental heart attack death of Eric Garner almost two years ago.That’s the level of pushback the Obama Justice Department is doing against actually seeking justice in the email and other related criminal matters.”

If you’re wondering why Congress seems to be sabotaging the American people with criminal trade deals, and if you’re concerned with why the richest people around the world grow richer at the expense of the American taxpayer and their unborn progeny, then I suggest you consider the value all of this compromise holds for influencing people.

“I Know More Than You Will Ever Know About Their Evil”