Controversial California Bill – How SB145 Bill is eliminating disparity and encouraging child abuse

Source: Michael Macor / The Chronicle

A controversial California bill has passed in the senate. The state is ready for eliminating disparity in its statutory rape laws. SB145 by state Senator Scott Wiener would now remove automatic sex offender registration for young adults who are convicted of having anal or oral sex with a minor. The decision would now be left to the judge. This has been said as the bill to eliminate the discrimination for the LGBTQ people in the criminal justice system.

The California bill was passed in the Assembly with 41-18 vote. It sailed through the senate with 23-10 majority as well. The bill has now been sent to Governor Gavin Newsom. He has time till September to act on it, reported San Francisco Chronicle.

Under the current penal law of California, the judge has to decide whether an offender needs to be put on the sex-offender list in case of vaginal intercourse. The law says that as it can lead to pregnancy and the offender can become father, hence he can be stigmatized. The offender might even find it difficult to get a job, hence automatic registration is not allowed. However, the same is not allowed for oral and anal sex. The offender gets auto-registered. The California Supreme Court upheld the distinction of the law in 2015.

However, under the new bill, every sexual act would be the same. Senator Scott Wiener thinks that it was long due to the LGTQB people.

However, this bill also extends to minors. The critics have come hard on it. The minor has no consent and thus this bill can further exploit them. Many have raised questions on the bill for the inclusion of minors.

The controversial bill is with the Governor now. If he approves it, this could be a new law. However, he has time till the end of this month to ponder on the details of the bill.

27 Northeast Ohio men arrested in undercover online child predator operation

COLUMBUS, Ohio (WSYX/WTTE) — Twenty-seven men alleged to have engaged in sexual activity with underage children online were arrested in a four-day operation led by the Ohio Internet Crimes Against Children (ICAC) Task Force.

In a release, the Cuyahoga County Prosecutor Michael C. O’Malley said 27 individuals were arrested as part of “Operation Moving Target” that ran from Aug. 24 to Aug. 27.

Undercover officers posed as children online on popular social media apps. According to the prosecutor, the 27 defendants, ages 21 to 61-years-old, allegedly engaged in “sexually explicit online conversations” with the officers that they thought were children.

Authorities said the men allegedly expressed an interest in engaging in sexual activity with the undercover officers and/or sent explicit images of their genitals.

“As we have seen the number of Cybertips dramatically increase this year, it is clear that online predators remain a serious threat to our children,” said O’Malley. “Hopefully the success of yet another operation serves as a stern warning to offenders that you will be found, you will be arrested, and you will be prosecuted.”

After the defendants allegedly engaged the undercover officers online, the men then traveled to a pre-arranged location in Cuyahoga County reportedly expecting to engage in sexual activity with a minor.

Officers arrested the men once they arrived. Officers said several men carried firearms, condoms, lubricant, sex toys, and drugs. 

Authorities filed initial charges against the following men:

  • Adam Davis, 41, Painesville, OH
  • Rajwant Singh, 44, Mayfield Heights, OH
  • Germaine Truett, 38, Cleveland, OH
  • Jason Johnson, 37, Cleveland, OH
  • Ronel Washington, 24, Garfield Heights, OH
  • Hector Pietri, 29, Cleveland, OH
  • Kyle Vansteenburg, 28, Cleveland, OH
  • Raphael Robinson, 26, Cleveland, OH
  • Corey Huber, 32, Elyria, OH
  • Michael Labondano, 30, Lyndhurst, OH
  • Nicholas Cook, 38, Bedford Heights, OH
  • Chazz Johnson-Hawks, 22, Solon, OH
  • Ian Rensel, 43, Bedford, OH
  • Jerry Harris, 35, Westlake, OH
  • Carson Strnisa, 21, Seven Hills, OH
  • Justin Cowger, 22, Cleveland, OH
  • Kim Koran, 61, Cleveland, OH
  • Nathan Troup, 39, New Castle, PA (Registered Sex Offender in the State of Pennsylvania)
  • Abed Aldur, 45, Parma, OH
  • Arturo Martinez, 47, University Heights, OH
  • Phillip Jones, 30, Streetsboro, OH
  • Keith Kozak, 41, Brooklyn, OH
  • Pedro Correa Jr., 42, Cleveland, OH
  • Ryan Dempsey, 37, Ashtabula, OH
  • Johnathan Smith, 34, Cleveland, OH
  • Robert Spisak, 45, Broadview Heights, OH
  • Jason Schmucker, 37, Canton, OH

Charges include: attempted unlawful sexual conduct with a minor, disseminating matter harmful to juveniles, importuning, and possessing criminal tools.

The Essence of Evil: Sex with Children Has Become Big Business in America

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Children, young girls—some as young as 9 years old—are being bought and sold for sex in America. The average age for a young woman being sold for sex is now 13 years old.

This is America’s dirty little secret.

According to the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children, “Children are being targeted and sold for sex in America every day.”

Sex trafficking—especially when it comes to the buying and selling of young girls—has become big business in America, the fastest growing business in organized crime and the second most-lucrative commodity traded illegally after drugs and guns.

As investigative journalist Amy Fine Collins notes, “It’s become more lucrative and much safer to sell malleable teens than drugs or guns. A pound of heroin or an AK-47 can be retailed once, but a young girl can be sold 10 to 15 times a day.”

SEX-TRAFFICKERS

Consider this: every two minutes, a child is exploited in the sex industry.

According to USA Todayadults purchase children for sex at least 2.5 million times a year in the United States.

Who buys a child for sex? Otherwise ordinary men from all walks of life.

They could be your co-worker, doctor, pastor or spouse,” writes journalist Tim Swarens, who spent more than a year investigating the sex trade in America.

In Georgia alone, it is estimated that 7,200 men (half of them in their 30s) seek to purchase sex with adolescent girls each month, averaging roughly 300 a day.

On average, a child might be raped by 6,000 men during a five-year period of servitude.

It is estimated that at least 100,000 children—girls and boys—are bought and sold for sex in the U.S. every year, with as many as 300,000 children in danger of being trafficked each year. Some of these children are forcefully abducted, others are runaways, and still others are sold into the system by relatives and acquaintances.

“Human trafficking—the commercial sexual exploitation of American children and women, via the Internet, strip clubs, escort services, or street prostitution—is on its way to becoming one of the worst crimes in the U.S.,” said prosecutor Krishna Patel.

This is not a problem found only in big cities.

It’s happening everywhere, right under our noses, in suburbs, cities and towns across the nation.

As Ernie Allen of the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children points out, “The only way not to find this in any American city is simply not to look for it.”

It is estimated that there are 100,000 to 150,000 under-aged child sex workers in the U.S.

Every year, the girls being bought and sold gets younger and younger.

Social media makes it all too easy for young people to be preyed upon by sexual predators.

As one news center reported, “Finding girls is easy for pimps. They look on MySpace, Facebook, and other social networks. They and their assistants cruise malls, high schools and middle schools. They pick them up at bus stops. On the trolley. Girl-to-girl recruitment sometimes happens.” Foster homes and youth shelters have also become prime targets for traffickers.

With a growing demand for sexual slavery and an endless supply of girls and women who can be targeted for abduction, this is not a problem that’s going away anytime soon.

In fact, this growing evil is, for all intents and purposes, out in the open: trafficked women and children are advertised on the internet, transported on the interstate, and bought and sold in swanky hotels.

Indeed, as I make clear in my book Battlefield America: The War on the American People, the government’s war on sex trafficking—much like the government’s war on terrorism, drugs and crime—has become a perfect excuse for inflicting more police state tactics (police check points, searches, surveillance, and heightened security) on a vulnerable public, while doing little to make our communities safer.

So what can you do?

Educate yourselves and your children about this growing menace in our communities.

Stop feeding the monster: Sex trafficking is part of a larger continuum in America that runs the gamut from homelessness, poverty, and self-esteem issues to sexualized television, the glorification of a pimp/ho culture—what is often referred to as the pornification of America—and a billion dollar sex industry built on the back of pornography, music, entertainment, etc.

This epidemic is largely one of our own making, especially in a corporate age where the value placed on human life takes a backseat to profit. It is estimated that the porn industry brings in more money than Amazon, Microsoft, Google, Apple, and Yahoo.

Call on your city councils, elected officials and police departments to make the battle against sex trafficking a top priority, more so even than the so-called war on terror and drugs and the militarization of law enforcement.

Stop prosecuting adults for victimless “crimes” such as growing lettuce in their front yard and focus on putting away the pimps and buyers who victimize these young women.

Finally, the police need to do a better job of training, identifying and responding to these issues; communities and social services need to do a better job of protecting runaways, who are the primary targets of traffickers; legislators need to pass legislation aimed at prosecuting traffickers and “johns,” the buyers who drive the demand for sex slaves; and hotels need to stop enabling these traffickers, by providing them with rooms and cover for their dirty deeds.

That so many women and children continue to be victimized, brutalized and treated like human cargo is due to three things: one, a consumer demand that is increasingly lucrative for everyone involved—except the victims; two, a level of corruption so invasive on both a local and international scale that there is little hope of working through established channels for change; and three, an eerie silence from individuals who fail to speak out against such atrocities.

But the truth is that we are all guilty of contributing to this human suffering. The traffickers are guilty. The consumers are guilty. The corrupt law enforcement officials are guilty. The women’s groups who do nothing are guilty. The foreign peacekeepers and aid workers who contribute to the demand for sex slaves are guilty. Most of all, every individual who does not raise a hue and cry over the atrocities being committed against women and children in almost every nation around the globe—including the United States—is guilty.

 

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