DISTURBING: Man Hires The Ku Klux Klan . . . To LYNCH His Black Neighbor!!

A South Carolina man was arrested for attempting to hire white supremacists from the Ku Klux Klan to kill his black neighbor, lynch him from a tree, and install a “flaming cross” in his front yard, police says.

Brandon Cory Lecroy, 25, of Hodges, South Carolina, was indicted by a federal grand jury on one count of solicitation to commit a crime of violence and one count of using interstate commerce facilities in the commission of murder for hire, the U.S. attorney’s office in South Carolina announced.

The FBI claims that in March Brandon contacted a white supremacist organization, asking them to “murder of his African American neighbor,” according to a court affidavit.

An undercover FBI agent subsequently recorded multiple phone calls with Brandon, where he asked to have his neighbor, who is identified only as “FJ” in the court documents, killed. “$500 and he’s a ghost,” Brandon told the undercover FBI agent in one of the recorded calls, in which he also requested his neighbor be hung from a tree and a “flaming cross” installed in his front yard, the affidavit says. In a subsequent phone conversation in March,

Brandon told the FBI agent he planned to take over the victim’s property and wanted to buy a 9 mm “ghost gun” that would be untraceable, according to the FBI account.

Brandon met with the undercover FBI agent on April 9 during which he pointed out where his neighbor lived, discussed potential future targets, and provided a $100 cash down payment for the alleged murder for hire, the affidavit says.

He was arrested later that day.

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He said he punched a woman for calling him Nigger. A jury called it murder.

Robert Coleman, 27, was found guilty of second-degree murder Monday in Alexandria Circuit Court. (Alexandria Detention Center)

 

“We of course remain disappointed that they didn’t see it as manslaughter,” Coleman’s attorney, Robert Jenkins, said after the jury returned. He said Coleman and his family were “grateful” for the jury’s recommended sentence, given that second-degree murder can carry a punishment of up to 40 years. It reflected, Jenkins said, “that this was not something that he wanted to happen, that he did not intend to take someone’s life.”

A judge will formally sentence Coleman on May 24, but deviations from jury recommendations are rare. He is being held at the Alexandria Detention Center.

“In an all-too-often repeated theme, a tragedy unfolded because of a defendant’s inability to tolerate a perceived slight,” Commonwealth’s Attorney Bryan Porter said in a statement. “Verbal arguments should never devolve into physical altercations because physical altercations often bring devastating consequences.”

[Woman assaulted outside a convenience store in Alexandria dies]

Coleman and Montiel-Benitez were strangers. Coleman was buying cigarettes. Montiel-Benitez was buying alcohol at the convenience store near the Mark Center on Seminary Road.

The source of the animosity between them remains a mystery. Surveillance video shows they engaged in a brief conversation, but there is no audio. Coleman’s girlfriend, Nikki Howard, testified she could not hear the entire conversation but broke the two up. In the video, Montiel-Benitez is seen walking to Coleman says that is when she called him the n-word; Howard remembered her cursing. In the video Coleman can be seen chasing Montiel-Benitez outside.

 

Through the leaves of a tree, another camera captures the punch that put Montiel-Benitez in a coma from which she did not recover.

Coleman fled the scene and was picked up the next day when a detective recognized him in the surveillance video. He at first denied involvement in what he thought was simply an assault. When he was told Montiel-Benitez was in critical condition, he admitted hitting her, but said he had not meant to cause serious harm.

He also thought the heavyset woman with short hair was a man, he told detectives.

Lord argued the focus on Montiel-Benitez’s appearance at trial, as well as the high level of alcohol in her system, was disrespectful to the dead.the door and then turning.

“She deserves to be treated with more humanity,” he told the jury.

He said Coleman was “a bully who was looking for a fight” and picked on Montiel-Benitez, who was just trying to get away.

Jenkins told jurors Montiel-Benitez’s .351 blood alcohol level and size might help explain why Coleman believed “this was going to be mutual combat, and he struck first.”

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NYPD cops fatally shoot bipolar black man holding metal pipe police mistake for gun on Brooklyn street!

 

Police said they were responding to three 911 calls that came in around 4:40 p.m. about a black man wearing a brown jacket waving what people thought was a silver gun on the corner of Utica Ave. and Montgomery St., NYPD Chief of Department Terence Monahan said at a press conference.

When the officers got to the street corner, Vassell turned to face them, aiming the object at them, Monahan said.

 

A bipolar Brooklyn man waving a metal object at passersby was fatally shot by police Wednesday when cops responding to 911 calls for a man with a gun said he “took a two-handed shooting stance” and pointed at them.

The man, identified by family members as Saheed Vassell, 34, was a Jamaica-born welder and the father of a teenage boy.

Police said they were responding to three 911 calls that came in around 4:40 p.m. about a black man wearing a brown jacket waving what people thought was a silver gun on the corner of Utica Ave. and Montgomery St., NYPD Chief of Department Terence Monahan said at a press conference.

When the officers got to the street corner, Vassell turned to face them, aiming the object at them, Monahan said.

“The suspect then took a two-handed shooting stance and pointed an object at the approaching officers,” the chief said, holding up a surveillance photo of a blurry figure standing next to a bodega ice machine with his arms outstretched.

Four officers — one in uniform, three in plainclothes — fired 10 shots, striking Vassell multiple times at about 4:45 p.m., Monahan said.

Police can be heard on emergency radio saying they were on scene at about 4:42 p.m. and 27 seconds later, officers were calling for an ambulance. The NYPD did not give an explanation when asked about that timeline.

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Saheed Vassell, 34, was shot dead by NYPD cops after he “took a two-handed shooting stance” and aimed a metal pipe at cops in Crown Heights, Brooklyn on April 4, 2018.

No firearm was found at the scene — and police said Vassell had been holding a metal pipe with a knob on the end.

Jaccbot Hinds, 40, who witnessed the shooting said officers jumped out of their unmarked police car and fired without warning.

“They just hopped out of the car. It’s almost like they did a hit. They didn’t say please. They didn’t say put your hands up, nothing,” Hinds said.

The NYPD refused to say if the responding officers warned Vassell before firing.

Vassell was taken to Kings County Hospital, where he died.

None of the officers wore body cameras, Monahan said.

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The victim was holding a metal pipe and aimed it at the officers in a “two-handed shooting stance.”

Bereft family members fought with security at Kings County Hospital after hospital staff refused to let them see Vassell’s body.

His 15-year-old son, Tyshawn, described him as a caring father who looked after him.

“He’s always been there for me no matter what,” Tyshawn said. “He’d always come check up on me, ask me if I’m good.”

He struggled to find the reason for the confrontation with police.

“He cared for everybody. If you saw him, he’d always be in a laughing mood. You would never catch him down,” Tyshawn said.

The shattered teen said he was still trying to process the news.

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Saheed Vassell’s father, Eric, said his son struggled with bipolar disorder and refused treatment.

 

“This is what our society has come to,” he said.

Eric Vassell, 63, the slain man’s father, said that his son, who went to Wingate High School, struggled with bipolar disorder, but refused treatment.

“He hasn’t taken his medication for years,” the father said.

The elder Vassell said he used to fret about Saheed.

“We were always worried for him. We would say should anything happen to him, we just have to do what we can do,” he said.

He, too, struggled for answers Wednesday night.

“Why shoot to kill?” he said. “Are you so afraid that you have to take his life.”

Witnesses said the gunfire threw the afternoon into chaos.

“I heard all these shots, I thought it was firecrackers at first. I turned around and you just see the cops standing over the guy,” witness Chris J. said. “First it was one, then it was nonstop after that.”

The witness, who was sitting in a salon across the street, said a plainclothes officer handcuffed Vassell as he lay motionless on the sidewalk.

“Blood was everywhere,” Chris said. “They put him on his back and they tried to compress his chest but he was gone.”

One bullet shattered a window at Chucky Fresh Market at 414 Utica Ave.

“There were gunshots, and I just ducked,” said a clerk who declined to identify himself. “A minute later, cops were everywhere.”

After the shooting, an angry crowd formed at the edge of the police tape shouting at police and pointing out the officers they believed to be responsible.

“The whole community came outside,” he added. “People were going crazy. It was a nightmare out there.”

Vassell was known as a quirky neighborhood character with some mental health issues. His family said that he struggled with alcohol, but the community knew he meant no harm.

Andre Wilson, 38, who’s known Vassell for 20 years, said he was odd but harmless.

“All he did was just walk around the neighborhood,” Wilson said. “He speaks to himself, usually he has an orange Bible or a rosary in his hand. He never had a problem with anyone.”

Wilson said he was shocked that it would come to this.

“The officers from the neighborhood, they know him. He has no issue with violence … This shouldn’t have happened at all.”

Vassell’s ex-partner, Sherlan Smith, 36, mother to Tyshawn, said she parted with Vassell on good terms.

“He was a good father. He wasn’t a bad person. No matter how they want to spin it, he wasn’t a bad person,” Smith said. “Too many black people are dying at hands of police officers and it’s about time something be done.”

On the fence outside Vassell’s building a sign read, “Without Consequences Police Murders Will Continue”, on the back it said “Black Lives Matter.”

She also noted the bleak symbolism of Vassell getting shot on April 4.

“On the anniversary of the man who stood up for black people … you’re going take a black man down with nine bullets,” Smith said.

The shooting comes as the nation paused to reflect on the 50th anniversary of the assassination of the Rev. Martin Luther King.

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