Florida woman blames cocaine in purse on windy day!

‘It must have flown through the window and into my purse,’ Kennecia Wells says.

FORT PIERCE, Fla. – A Florida woman who was arrested last month on drug possession charges blamed the cocaine found in her purse on the wind.

Kennecia Posey, 26, was one of two passengers in a car that was swerving in the roadway when it was stopped by Fort Pierce police March 21.

According to the police report, an officer approached the car and smelled an odor of marijuana coming from inside.

During a search of the car, the officer found cocaine and marijuana in separate bags inside a purse that Posey had on her lap.

When questioned about the drugs, Posey admitted that the marijuana was hers, police said. The cocaine was a different story.

“I don’t know anything about any cocaine,” Posey said, according to the report. “It’s a windy day. It must have flown through the window and into my purse.”

Posey was booked into the county jail on one felony count of cocaine possession and a misdemeanor count of marijuana possession. She was later released on bond.

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FLOYD MAYWEATHER BODYGUARD SHOT IN ATLANTA … Cops Say!!

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7:04 AM PT — Cops tell us … they believe Floyd was in one of the SUVs in the entourage that was targeted by the shooter.

Floyd was NOT injured in the attack and it’s unclear if he was the specific target. We’re also told cops do NOT have a suspect in custody at this point.

A man claiming to be one of Floyd Mayweather‘s bodyguards was shot outside of an upscale hotel in Atlanta Monday morning … the Atlanta Police Dept. tells TMZ Sports.

Unclear if Floyd was with the man at the time of the shooting.

Cops tell us … it all went down at 3 AM on Monday morning outside of the InterContinental hotel in Buckhead.

We’re told three vehicles were returning from the hotel from a nearby nightclub.

Cops says, “Another vehicle pulled up beside them at the intersection of Peachtree Road and Highland Drive and fired several times at one of the vehicles. All three vehicles fled and reported being followed for a distance.”

“After losing the vehicle that was following them, the victim’s vehicle drove to Grady Hospital where the victim was treated for a gunshot wound to the leg and is in stable condition.”

“At this time, it appears that this was not a random shooting and the shooter was targeting the victim’s vehicle.”

“The victim advised that he is a bodyguard for Floyd Mayweather.”

Story developing … 

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Man Shot Off His Own Testicle With A Sawed-Off Shotgun!

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An ex-cage fighter was caught in possession of a shotgun after he blasted himself in the groin – and had to have a testicle removed, a court heard.

Scott Benjamin, 30, was rushed to hospital for surgery after he suffered the ‘self-inflicted’ wound in the bedroom of a house on January 4 last year.

A court heard police were called to an address in Walsall, West Midlands, after reports of a disturbance and found Benjamin trying to smash a window with a bed.

Officers had to break down the door to the upstairs bedroom where he had ‘barricaded’ himself in, jurors were told. Benjamin was discovered under a mattress in a pool of blood with two sawn-off shotguns nearby. He claimed he suffered the injury – which led to him losing a testicle – at the hands of a gang of eight masked men who burst into the property. But prosecutors have dismissed his version of events as ‘complete nonsense.’

On Thursday Benjamin went on trial accused of two charges of possessing a sawed-off shotgun and two of possessing a firearm when prohibited to do so. Wolverhampton Crown Court was told officers forced entry to the house armed with Tasers and protective shields. Laura Culley, prosecuting, said Benjamin was found trying unsuccessfully to manhandle the base of a bed through a smashed upstairs window. Used cartridges were also recovered and a fingerprint of the defendant was uncovered on one of the weapons Giving evidence, Pc Martin Fraser, the first officer at the scene, said: ‘As I went in I immediately heard a colleague shout ‘gun.’ I could see a mattress with somebody underneath. ‘I looked down and could see a sawn-off shotgun as well as a man under the mattress. ‘He looked very confused as if under the influence of drugs or it might have been shock.’ The defendant claims hooded armed men had forced him to touch their guns and ammunition and wounded him while shooting out windows at the address He claimed to have known ‘one or two’ of the intruders from their build and the sound of their voices, but refused to name them. Following hospital treatment, he told a police officer: ‘I don’t know why they say I shot myself. I didn’t. Somebody shot me. I was set up.’ During a formal police interview, he added: ‘They started firing at the windows and I asked to be hit in the body and not the face if I was going to be shot. ‘The gun was nearly touching me. ‘He started poking my head. Then he let it off and I just remember the pain..’ Following the shooting, the wounded man barricaded himself into his room and began throwing things out his window in a bid to attract passersby. The court heard how Benjamin had been on a cocaine and alcohol binge the day before the shooting. When asked in interview if this had altered his perception of the incident, he allegedly said: ‘It could seem like that but why is somebody going to start popping off shots and then shoot themself for no reason?’ He also suggested that the motive for the ‘attack’ was an ‘issue’ with another man that he refused to name. Benjamin claimed the housemate Andrew Fellows, who lived at the address with Tina Richards, had owed the same man money and set him to up settle the debts. Giving evidence from the witness stand, Mr Fellows said: ‘Why would I set him up? He is a friend of mine. Have you seen the size of him? I didn’t stitch anyone up.’ He also said he was at a ‘complete loss’ to explain why the shooting had happened. Benjamin, of Chelmsley Wood, Birmingham, denies the charges. The trial continues.

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When Incest Is Best: Kissing Cousins Have More Kin!

Study analyzing more than 200 years of data finds that couples consisting of third cousins have the highest reproductive success

It is not quite incest. And though it will increase your chances of birthing a healthy baby, it is a bit unorthodox, to say the least. Still, scientists at Icelandic biotechnology company deCODE genetics say that when third and fourth cousins procreate, they generally have scads of kids and grandkids (relative to everyone else).

It has long been wondered exactly how kinship influences reproductive success. Previous studies have uncovered positive correlations, but the biological data has been clouded by socioeconomic factors (such as average marrying age and family size) in those populations in which consanguineous marriage is commonplace, such as in India, Pakistan and the Middle East. The new study, however, was able to shed light on the biological reason for the earlier findings.

Scientists came to their conclusions after studying the records of more than 160,000 Icelandic couples with members born between 1800 and 1965. “The advantage of using the Icelandic data set lies in this population being small and one of the most socioeconomically and culturally homogenous societies in the world,” the researchers report in Science, “with little variation in family size [and] use of contraceptives and marriage practices, in contrast with most previously studied populations.”

The results of the exhaustive study are constant throughout the generations analyzed. Women born between 1800 and 1824 who mated with a third cousin had significantly more children and grandchildren (4.04 and 9.17, respectively) than women who hooked up with someone no closer than an eighth cousin (3.34 and 7.31). Those proportions held up among women born more than a century later when couples were, on average, having fewer children.

Despite the general pattern for reproductive success favoring close kinship, couples that were second cousins or more closely related did not have as many children. The most likely reason, scientists say: offspring of such close relatives were likely to have much shorter life spans, because of the chance of inheriting harmful genetic mutations.

“With close inbreeding—between first cousins—there is a significant increase in the probability that both partners will share one or more detrimental recessive genes, leading to a 25 percent chance that these genes will be expressed in each pregnancy,” says Alan Bittles, director of the Center for Human Genetics at Edith Cowan University in Joondalup, Australia, who was not involved in the study.

Interestingly, one evolutionary argument for mating with a relative is that it might reduce a woman’s chance of having a miscarriage caused by immunological incompatibility between a mother and her child. Some individuals have an antigen (a protein that can launch an immune response) on the surface of their red blood cells called a rhesus factor—commonly abbreviated “Rh.” In some cases—typically during a second pregnancy—when a woman gets pregnant, she and her fetus may have incompatible blood cells, which could trigger the mother’s immune system to treat the fetus as a foreign intruder, causing a miscarriage. This occurrence is less probable if the parents are closely related, because their blood makeup is more likely to match.

“It may well be that the enhanced reproductive success observed in the Iceland study at the level of third [and] fourth cousins, who on average would be expected to have inherited 0.8 percent to 0.2 percent of their genes from a common ancestor,” Bittles says, “represents this point of balance between the competing advantages and disadvantages of inbreeding and outbreeding.”

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He said he punched a woman for calling him Nigger. A jury called it murder.

Robert Coleman, 27, was found guilty of second-degree murder Monday in Alexandria Circuit Court. (Alexandria Detention Center)

 

“We of course remain disappointed that they didn’t see it as manslaughter,” Coleman’s attorney, Robert Jenkins, said after the jury returned. He said Coleman and his family were “grateful” for the jury’s recommended sentence, given that second-degree murder can carry a punishment of up to 40 years. It reflected, Jenkins said, “that this was not something that he wanted to happen, that he did not intend to take someone’s life.”

A judge will formally sentence Coleman on May 24, but deviations from jury recommendations are rare. He is being held at the Alexandria Detention Center.

“In an all-too-often repeated theme, a tragedy unfolded because of a defendant’s inability to tolerate a perceived slight,” Commonwealth’s Attorney Bryan Porter said in a statement. “Verbal arguments should never devolve into physical altercations because physical altercations often bring devastating consequences.”

[Woman assaulted outside a convenience store in Alexandria dies]

Coleman and Montiel-Benitez were strangers. Coleman was buying cigarettes. Montiel-Benitez was buying alcohol at the convenience store near the Mark Center on Seminary Road.

The source of the animosity between them remains a mystery. Surveillance video shows they engaged in a brief conversation, but there is no audio. Coleman’s girlfriend, Nikki Howard, testified she could not hear the entire conversation but broke the two up. In the video, Montiel-Benitez is seen walking to Coleman says that is when she called him the n-word; Howard remembered her cursing. In the video Coleman can be seen chasing Montiel-Benitez outside.

 

Through the leaves of a tree, another camera captures the punch that put Montiel-Benitez in a coma from which she did not recover.

Coleman fled the scene and was picked up the next day when a detective recognized him in the surveillance video. He at first denied involvement in what he thought was simply an assault. When he was told Montiel-Benitez was in critical condition, he admitted hitting her, but said he had not meant to cause serious harm.

He also thought the heavyset woman with short hair was a man, he told detectives.

Lord argued the focus on Montiel-Benitez’s appearance at trial, as well as the high level of alcohol in her system, was disrespectful to the dead.the door and then turning.

“She deserves to be treated with more humanity,” he told the jury.

He said Coleman was “a bully who was looking for a fight” and picked on Montiel-Benitez, who was just trying to get away.

Jenkins told jurors Montiel-Benitez’s .351 blood alcohol level and size might help explain why Coleman believed “this was going to be mutual combat, and he struck first.”

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‘Devil’s breath’ aka scopolamine: can it really zombify you?

The substance has been blamed for thousands of crimes in South America. Now there are reports of the incapacitating drug being used in street robberies in Paris. From use by Nazis to obstetricians, it certainly has a colourful history

One of the most enduring hoaxes you might hear in a backpacker hostel is that of the drug-soaked business card: someone hands you their card, and the drug is instantly absorbed by your skin. You fall into a zombie-like state, where you will do anything for your attacker, from empty out your bank account to pull a trigger on someone.

The drug is burandanga, or scopolamine, derived from nightshade plants, and there are countless stories about how criminals in Colombia and Ecuador use the drug, which is said to remove a person’s free will, to assault victims or rob them. It is also known as “devil’s breath” and has been described as “the most dangerous drug in the world”. It’s hard to know which are urban myths and which are genuine. The US’s Overseas Security Advisory Council warns travellers in Quito about the dangers of falling victim to a scopolamine attack, and refers to “unofficial estimates” – it doesn’t say where this figure is from – of 50,000 scopolamine incidents there every year.

Now, according to reports, the drug has been used on “dozens” of victims in Paris, and three people have been arrested. The Daily Telegraph suggests that two women had encouraged their victims to breathe in the drug, then got the victims to take them home where they stole money and jewellery.

“You get these scare stories and they have no toxicology, so nobody knows what it is,” says Val Curran, professor of pharmacology at UCL’s Clinical Pharmacology Unit. “The idea that it is scopolamine is a bit far-fetched, because it could be anything.”

Dr Les King, chemist and former forensic scientist, agrees. The idea that someone could become zombified after someone blows powder into their face “seems pretty unlikely for a start”. There is no evidence it is being used in Europe, he says. “The European Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Drug Addiction has never had any mention of scopolamine being used in this way.”

It would be hard to get hold of. “I think if you tried to order some scopolamine from a chemical company, they’d be reluctant to sell it to you,” says King. “It’s not a drug you can buy [on the street] in the way you might buy some other new psychoactive substance, some legal high, or whatever. It’s not available in that sense because it’s not a drug you would want to take for any pleasurable purpose.”

It is “horrible stuff”, says Curran. “When I used to give it to people [in experiments], they hated it – it makes your mouth really dry, it makes your pupils constrict. Certainly high doses would be completely incapacitating.” And does it remove free will? “It would completely zonk you out,” says Curran, “ but I don’t know about removing free will. It incapacitates you because you’d feel so drowsy, you wouldn’t remember what was going on. But you would do after huge doses of alcohol, or lots of other drugs like Valium or other benzodiazepine drugs.”

Scopolamine has marked amnesic effects, and is used in Alzheimer’s research. Mostly though, it is used at very low doses to treat motion sickness, usually though a transdermal patch.

It is one of those drugs with a rich backstory. It is said to be one of the first “truth serums”. In the early 20th century, it was administered by some doctors as a pain-relief drug – or rather a drug that led to the forgetting of pain – in childbirth until one obstetrician noticed how women who had been given it answered candidly to questions; he later wondered if it could be used when questioning people charged with crimes. It was used as evidence in some trials, but dubiously.

Then there are stories of it being used in Nazi Germany as an interrogation tool, and also in the middle ages by witches. “The degree to which any of this stuff is true is unknown,” says Curran. “There’s a lot of myth.”

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Study: A Voodoo Doll Of The Boss Will Make Your Employees Happier!?

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Allowing disgruntled staff to stab voodoo dolls of their boss could help them feel less resentful and improve the quality of their work, a new study has suggested.

According to the Health and Safety Executive, more than 12 million Britons are forced to take time off work each year because of stress and anxiety, often caused by pressure from overbearing or abusive managers.

But rather than allowing staff to brood over their mistreatment, which can be detrimental to work, business experts have suggested they should be allowed to take out their anger on voodoo dolls.

A study of 229 workers in the US and Canada found that engaging in ‘symbolic retaliation’ lowered feelings of injustice by one third.

Although revenge is often viewed negatively, the researchers say the findings highlight ‘the largely overlooked benefit of retaliation from the victim’s perspective.’

Assistant Professor Dr Lindie Liang, of Lazaridis School of Business and Economics at Wilfrid Laurier University in Ontario Canada said voodoo dolls could help staff

“As weird as it sounds, yes,” she said  “We found a simple and harmless symbolic act of retaliation can make people feel like they’re getting even and restoring their sense of fairness.

“It may not have to be a voodoo doll per se: theoretically anything that serves as a symbolic act of retaliation, like throwing darts at a picture of your boss, might work.

Symbolically retaliating against an abusive boss can benefit employees psychologically by allowing them to restore their sense of justice in the workplace.”

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The participants in the study used an online voodoo doll programme created by Dumb.com, which allows users to name the effigy after their boss, and sticking it with pins, burn it with a candle, and pinch it with pliers.

Although voodoo dolls are often linked to Africa and the Americas in popular fiction, early records suggest they have their origins in the British medieval period, when people would make rag dolls or sculptures of witches – called poppetts – and pierce them with pins to inflict harm or break an enchantment.

The dolls were later mistakenly linked with Afro-Caribbean Voodoo or Vodou.

The report authors decided to embark on the study because previous research suggested that people who feel they have been treated unfairly will lash out at their abuser, but it can spark a spiral of retaliation and counter-retaliation which is detrimental in the long term.

“We wanted to see, rather than actually retaliating against the abusive boss, whether mistreated employees could benefit from harmless acts of symbolic retaliation,” added Dr Liang.

For the study, the participants were asked to recall and visualise a workplace interaction which had involved abuse from a supervisor. Some were then asked to retaliate using a voodoo doll, before all completed a task to fill in the blanks to complete words.

Those who had been allowed to stick pins in their virtual boss were far less likely to still feel bitter, and were also better at completing the word exercise.

In a paper in the journal The Leadership Quarterly, the authors conclude: “These findings suggest that retaliation not only benefits individual victims, but may also benefit the organization as a whole, given that justice perceptions is important for employee performance and well-being.”

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