Pelosi’s Home VANDALIZED With Pigs Head, Message About $2,000 Checks

Democrat Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s $5m San Francisco home is VANDALIZED with red paint, a pig’s head and a spray-painted message about $2,000 checks during battle with Republicans over stimulus payments

  • Police sources told TMZ that cops were called out to reports of vandalism at the House Speaker’s property around 3 a.m. New Year’s Day
  • DailyMail.com has contacted San Francisco Police Department for comment
  • A photo posted on social media shows a white garage plastered in graffiti
  • ‘2k’ is written on the garage and then crossed out, in what appears to be a reference to the $2,000 stimulus checks Pelosi is pushing for
  • The graffiti also reads ‘cancel rent’ and ‘we want everything’
  • Red paint covers the driveway and a pig’s head sits on the paving slabs

Nancy Pelosi’s San Francisco home was vandalized overnight with a pig’s head surrounded in a pool of red paint, as well as a spray-painted message appearing to allude to the failed $2,000 stimulus checks.

Photos of the disturbing scene shared on social media by conservative filmmaker Maggie VandenBerghe on Friday showed the House Speaker’s white garage door defaced with black graffiti text reading: ‘$2k Cancel RENT! We want everything!’

The message appeared to be in reference Pelosi’s recent efforts to increase the second round of COVID relief checks to $2,000, which have been repeatedly rejected by Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell.

The vandals also spray-painted two letter As enclosed in circles, most commonly known as the symbol for anarchism.

Underneath the disturbing message on the driveway was a pool of red paint with a pig’s head placed at the center of the pavement.

Nancy Pelosi ‘s San Francisco home has been vandalized with red paint, a pigs head and a spray painted message about $2,000 checks, according to TMZ

Police sources told the outlet that cops were called out to reports of vandalism at the House Speaker’s property in the early hours of New Year’s Day. Her home as it normally looks above

San Francisco officers arrived on the scene around 3 a.m. and a police report was taken, TMZ said. Pictured Pelosi 

According to TMZ, San Francisco Police had been called to the home on reports of vandalism at the property in the early hours of New Year’s Day.

Officers arrived around 3am and documented the incident in a report, but it is unclear if there are any suspects. DailyMail.com has reached out to the San Francisco Police Department for comment.

VandenBerghe, a self-proclaimed patriot and independent journalist that has been featured on conservative news outlets in the past, accused police in her post of trying to cover up the incident after the city reportedly called in the vandalism. 

‘City called to clean up at 3am & police attempting to stop photos of scene. Media SILENT,’ she tweeted. 

The San Francisco mansion is located in the city’s swanky Pacific Heights neighborhood and counts as one of Pelosi’s several residences in California. 

The four-bedroom, three-bathroom house has an estimated worth of $5.4million, according to property records.

Photos of the bizarre scene were shared on social media by conservative filmmaker Maggie VandenBerghe on Friday afternoon

The home was also once the site of a small protest in September, when Pelosi came under fire for getting her hair styled at a local salon that had been closed under COVID-19 restrictions.

The Speaker of the House is yet to comment on the incident as of Friday evening.  

Pelosi has been calling for the second round of stimulus checks to be increased from $600 to $2,000 – an amount also proposed by Donald Trump.

But the efforts have so far fallen short with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell on Wednesday blocking the Democrats’ standalone bill to send the checks to Americans.   

McConnell told Pelosi the Senate won’t be ‘bullied’ into passing it, dashing hopes of the higher checks being sent out to Americans.  

Pelosi had urged the Republican to allow the upper chamber to vote on the bill after it passed in the House through a bipartisan vote.  

‘The Democrats and Republicans in the House have passed that legislation. Who is holding up that distribution to the American people? Mitch McConnell and the Senate Republicans,’ she said Wednesday.

This isn’t the first time the House Speaker’s home has been targeted. Back in September, a Youtuber appeared to defecate in the driveway of her home in a livestream video 

‘In blocking it, they are in denial of the hardship the American people are experiencing now, health wise, financially, and every way.’ 

But judging by the state of the garage door, some Americans are outraged with Pelosi over her efforts. 

This isn’t the first time the House Speaker’s home has been targeted. 

Back in September, a Youtuber appeared to defecate in the driveway of her home in a livestream video. 

In the footage, the man was seen walking through the streets of San Francisco in search of the Democrat’s home. 

Once he found her home, he set up a camera across the road and walked over to her driveway.   

Armando then saluted his viewers, pulled down his pants and proceeded to squat. 

After a few seconds, Armando stands to his feet and wipes his buttocks before walking away and leaving behind what appeared to be feces. 

‘That was for President Trump,’ Armando is heard telling his viewers.

Cosby’s sex assault conviction goes before high-level court

FILE – In this April 26, 2018 file photo, Bill Cosby, center, leaves the the Montgomery County Courthouse in Norristown, Pa., after being convicted of drugging and molesting a woman. The actor has spent more than two years in prison since he was convicted of sexual assault in the first celebrity trial of the #MeToo era. Now the Pennsylvania Supreme Court is set to hear his appeal of the conviction on Tuesday, Dec. 1, 2020. The arguments will focus on the trial judge’s decision to let five other accusers testify for the prosecution. (AP Photo/Matt Slocum, File)

PHILADELPHIA – Pennsylvania’s highest court questioned Tuesday whether Bill Cosby’s alleged history of intoxicating and sexually assaulting young women amounted to a signature crime pattern, given studies that show as many as half of all sexual assaults involve drugs or alcohol. Cosby, 83, hopes to overturn his 2018 sex assault conviction because the judge let prosecutors call five other accusers who said Cosby mistreated them the same way he did his victim, Andrea Constand. The defense said their testimony prejudiced the jury against the actor and should not have been allowed.

“That conduct you describe — the steps, the young women — there’s literature that says that’s common to 50% of these assaults — thousands of assaults — nationwide,” Chief Justice Thomas G. Saylor asked a prosecutor during oral arguments in the Pennsylvania Supreme Court. “So how can that be a common scheme?”

The prosecutor, in response, offered more precise details about the relationships, saying Cosby used his fame and fortune to mentor the women and then took advantage of it. And he sometimes befriended their mothers or families.

“There was a built-in level of trust because of his status in the entertainment industry and because he held himself out as a public moralist,” said Assistant District Attorney Adrienne Jappe, of suburban Philadelphia’s Montgomery County, where Constand says she was assaulted at Cosby’s estate in 2004.

“The signature was isolating and intoxicating young women for the purpose of sexually assaulting them,” Jappe said.

Cosby has served more than two years of his three- to 10-year prison sentence for drugging and molesting Constand, whom he met through the basketball program at his alma mater, Temple University. 

Courts have long wrestled with decisions about when other accusers should be allowed to testify in criminal cases. It’s generally not allowed, but state law permits a few exceptions, including to show a signature crime pattern or to prove someone’s identity. The state’s high court appears eager to address the issue, and in doing so took on the first celebrity criminal case of the #MeToo era. The court typically takes several months to issue its opinion.

Judge Steven T. O’Neill had allowed just one other accuser to testify at Cosby’s first trial in 2017, when the jury could not reach a verdict. The #MeToo movement took hold months later with media reports about movie mogul Harvey Weinstein and other men accused of sexual misconduct.

O’Neill then let five other accusers testify at Cosby’s retrial in 2018, when the jury convicted him of drugging and sexually assaulting Constand.

Cosby’s appellate lawyer, Jennifer Bonjean, said prosecutors exploited “all of this vague testimony” about his prior behavior and his acknowledgement that he had given women alcohol or quaaludes before sexual encounters. 

“They put Mr. Cosby in a position where he had no shot. The presumption of innocence just didn’t exist for him,” Bonjean said in the arguments Tuesday, which were held online because of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Constand went to police in 2005, about a year after the night at his home. The other women knew Cosby in the 1980s through the entertainment industry, and they did not go to police.

The defense also challenged the trial judge’s decision to let the jury hear damaging testimony Cosby gave in a lawsuit Constand filed against him in 2005, after then-prosecutor Bruce Castor declined to arrest Cosby.

The testimony was sealed for nearly a decade until The Associated Press asked a federal judge to release documents from the case as more Cosby accusers came forward. The judge agreed, and Castor’s successor reopened the case in 2015, just months before the statute of limitations to arrest him would have expired.

Cosby, a once-beloved comedian and actor known as “America’s Dad,” has said he will serve his entire 10-year term rather than admit wrongdoing to the parole board. 

Criminal law professor Laurie Levenson believes it’s important for the court to scrutinize Cosby’s conviction given the publicity the case attracted, the legal questions it raised and the potential influence of the #MeToo movement. 

However, she was less sure there’s data to show that intoxication was as prevalent in sex assault cases in the 1980s through 2004 as it is today.

“We have heard a lot more about doping types of sexual assaults (recently), but I’m not sure how common it was at the time of this offense,” said Levenson, of Loyola Law School. “I think the court’s doing the right thing, which is asking, ‘Did he get convicted on legitimate evidence?'”

The AP does not typically identify sexual assault victims without their permission, which Constand has granted.