Repeated leaks and revelations are chipping away at Trump’s attempts to keep his tax records secret from the American public

5cd2b468021b4c04c2399936-1920-960Donald Trump, then a real estate tycoon and media personality, poses in the Trump Tower atrium in 1989.

 

Trump in 2016 became the first presidential nominee of a major party in decades to refuse to release his tax returns.

But a series of leaks and investigations mean that, piecemeal, he is losing the battle to conceal his tax records from the American public.

The latest came last last night, when the New York Times published details of the president’s 1985 to 1994 tax records.

The documents expose large losses by Trumps’ network of casinos and hotel businesses, totalling $1.17 billion over the course of the nine years — more than any other US citizen in the same period, according to the Times.

And they contribute to a growing — but still incomplete — picture of Trump’s tax stratagems and business dealings before his election.

Before his victory— back in October 2016 – the Times acquired documents that undermined Trump’s campaign trail boasts about his business acumen, showing that Trump claimed $916 million losses in his 1995 personal filing.

The documents suggested that he may have paid no federal income tax for two decades.

5cd2b495021b4c047c7d6df7-1920-1440Trump welcomes Slovakia’s Prime Minister at the White House in May 2019.

 

Trump bounced back from the revelations, in a debate with his presidential rival Hillary Clinton claiming that paying no taxes made him “smart.” He went on to win the election.

In May 2017 more details from Trump’s private tax documents were made public by MSNBC host Rachel Maddow, who acquired two pages from Trump’s 2005 tax returns that had been leaked to investigative reporter David Cay Johnston.

The documents showed that Trump had in fact not avoided paying taxes for two decades, and paid $38 million on $153 million earnings that year, though at a comparatively low 25% tax rate.

Maddow defended herself afterwards from accusations the story was something of a letdown.

There were more more damaging revelations from the Times last year, which reported that Trump used a series of dubious tax schemes to shield his $400 million inheritance from his father from the IRS.

The information in the public eye so far exposes a pattern of failure and enormous financial losses during a nine-year period when Trump was building his brand as a superlative dealmaker — puncturing a narrative of success that was central to his presidential bid in 2016.

The president, though, has continued to refuse to release the full documents.

Commentators have speculated that the information could show Trump’s boasts of his wealth to be an exaggeration, lay bare how little tax he paid after his 1995 losses — or even expose financial ties with Russia.

When Democrats seized control of the House after November’s mid-terms, they pledged to get the full records.

The House Ways and Means Committee in March issued a formal demand to the Treasury for six years of the president’s tax records.

On Monday Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin refused to meet a second deadline for handing over the records, claiming the Democrat-led panel was acting for purely political reasons. The situation could now escalate to a Supreme Court showdown.

A victory there for Trump would vindicate his strategy of concealing the documents, and offer a big win after a series of small links chipped away at his preference for secrecy. But regardless of the outcome, we may see more Trump records reach the light of day.

State lawmakers have also begun to place the president under pressure, with Democrats in 20 states introducing bills that would require presidential candidates to release their tax returns in order to appear on the state ballots in 2020.

The president continued to insist he could not release the returns because they remained under Internal Revenue Service audit — but promised to do so at an unspecified point in the future.

The IRS has said those under audit are free to release their tax returns at any time, but the battle is likely to continue and Trump’s reluctance to release the information in full to be a source of speculation.

 

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Video shows healthcare staff punching, beating man with disabilities with belt

Investigation found at least five employees at the mental health facility beat a man, and allowed other patients to join in.

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GORDON, Ga. — The family of a mentally disabled Georgia man has released video showing their loved one being repeatedly beaten by staff hired to care for him.

Brian Jarrad, the family’s attorney, said the family wanted to release video of the 2013 incident now to warn the public that neglect is happening at facilities all across Georgia.

“These are some of our most weakest, our most vulnerable citizens. So, it’s important to know and watch and to see when they’re not being cared for appropriately,” said Jarrard.

The Macon attorney represents 55-year-old Joey Cason. When Cason’s family could no longer care for him, they admitted him into Total Care, a facility in Gordan, Georgia, licensed to care for the developmentally disabled.

“Physically, he is not disabled. He is able to function physically, but he is severely mentally disabled,” explained Jarrard.

Surveillance video recorded on November 7, 2013 shows staff repeatedly hitting Cason with belts, punching him on the ground and allowing other residents to hit him.

At one point, staff appears to be taunting Cason with food and laughing at him.

“I think anybody would find the video despicable,” said Jarrard. “It was heartbreaking. It made me angry to think of individuals who were being paid to care for him were engaged in just despicable abuse.”

Gordon Police charged a caretaker named Shakia Smith with battery and abuse/neglect of an elder person.

Jarrard said the case against the former facility owner is still pending. Carson is now at a different facility in south Georgia and is doing well, Jarrad said.

The Georgia Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities revoked the facility’s license after an investigation.

Total Care’s former owner, Pamela Reaves, declined to comment about the pending litigation. Her attorney, Wayne Kendall, did not return follow-up questions sent by email.

The video’s release comes on the heels of Georgia seeking to end nearly 10 years of federal supervision of its mental health care services. The Reveal Investigation also uncovered a rise in abuse, neglect and exploitation at state licensed mental health care providers.

Tune into 11Alive Thursday night at 11 p.m. for The Reveal’s investigation into Georgia mental health providers and other abuse claims against facilities across the state.

 

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