MAXINE WATERS: TRUMP SHOULD ‘TAKE RESPONSIBILITY’ FOR BOMB THREATS, HE’S BEEN ‘DOG-WHISTLING’ TO SUPPORTERS

democrat-maxine-waters-bomb-threat-i-aint-scaredMaxine Waters speaks at Families Belong Together-Freedom for Immigrants March Los Angeles at Los Angeles City Hall on June 30. She said President Donald Trump should take responsibility for the kinds of “violence we’re seeing.”
EMMA MCINTYRE/GETTY IMAGES FOR FAMILIES BELONG TOGETHER LA

White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders pushed back against that notion on Thursday, saying Trump’s rhetoric had nothing to do with the series of explosive devices.

“The president has condemned violence in all forms” since day one, Sanders told reporters. She said she thought “everyone has a role to play.”

At a rally the week before, Trump publicly praised Montana GOP Representative Greg Gianforte for body slamming a reporter. On the campaign trail, the president encouraged attendees to assault protesters who disrupted his rallies.

While Trump called for the country to “unify” in response to the bomb threats, hours later at a political rally in Wisconsin he said it was the media’s responsibility to “stop the endless hostility.” On Twitter Thursday morning he blamed the media for the “anger we see today in our society.”

Waters has long been a fierce critic of Trump and his administration, even calling for his impeachment at times. After receiving death threats over her calls for protesters to publicly harass administration officials, Waters responded by saying, “If you shoot me, you better shoot straight.”

“We must not be intimidated to the point where we stop advocating and protesting for justice,” Waters said in her Wednesday interview. “As the young people say, ‘I ain’t scared.'”

“I think the president of United States should take responsibility for the kind of violence that we are seeing for the first time in different ways,” Waters said. “I think the president of the United States has been dog-whistling to his constituency, making them believe that their problems are caused by those people over there. And I think they are acting in a way that they think the president wants them to do and the way he wants them to act.”

Waters added that, “in his own way,” the president “really does do a lot to promote violence.”

Critics of the president have argued that some of the rhetoric and conspiracy theories that Trump spreads on Twitter and at political rallies could be perceived by some as a call for violence.

White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders pushed back against that notion on Thursday, saying Trump’s rhetoric had nothing to do with the series of explosive devices.

“The president has condemned violence in all forms” since day one, Sanders told reporters. She said she thought “everyone has a role to play.”

At a rally the week before, Trump publicly praised Montana GOP Representative Greg Gianforte for body slamming a reporter. On the campaign trail, the president encouraged attendees to assault protesters who disrupted his rallies.

While Trump called for the country to “unify” in response to the bomb threats, hours later at a political rally in Wisconsin he said it was the media’s responsibility to “stop the endless hostility.” On Twitter Thursday morning he blamed the media for the “anger we see today in our society.”

Waters has long been a fierce critic of Trump and his administration, even calling for his impeachment at times. After receiving death threats over her calls for protesters to publicly harass administration officials, Waters responded by saying, “If you shoot me, you better shoot straight.”

“We must not be intimidated to the point where we stop advocating and protesting for justice,” Waters said in her Wednesday interview. “As the young people say, ‘I ain’t scared.'”

Share or comment on this article

Advertisements

U.S. owes black people reparations for a history of ‘racial terrorism,’ says U.N. panel

imrs.phpSlave shackles on display at the new National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington. (Kevin Lamarque/Reuters)

The history of slavery in the United States justifies reparations for African Americans, argues a recent report by a U.N.-affiliated group based in Geneva.

This conclusion was part of a study by the United Nations’ Working Group of Experts on People of African Descent, a body that reports to the international organization’s High Commissioner on Human Rights. The group of experts, which includes leading human rights lawyers from around the world, presented its findings to the United Nations Human Rights Council on Monday, pointing to the continuing link between present injustices and the dark chapters of American history.

“In particular, the legacy of colonial history, enslavement, racial subordination and segregation, racial terrorism and racial inequality in the United States remains a serious challenge, as there has been no real commitment to reparations and to truth and reconciliation for people of African descent,” the report stated. “Contemporary police killings and the trauma that they create are reminiscent of the past racial terror of lynching.”

Citing the past year’s spate of police officers killing unarmed African American men, the panel warned against “impunity for state violence,” which has created, in its words, a “human rights crisis” that “must be addressed as a matter of urgency.”

The panel drew its recommendations, which are nonbinding and unlikely to influence Washington, after a fact-finding mission in the United States in January. At the time, it hailed the strides taken to make the American criminal justice system more equitable but pointed to the corrosive legacy of the past.

“Despite substantial changes since the end of the enforcement of Jim Crow and the fight for civil rights, ideology ensuring the domination of one group over another, continues to negatively impact the civil, political, economic, social and cultural rights of African Americans today,” it said in a statement. “The dangerous ideology of white supremacy inhibits social cohesion amongst the US population.”

United Nations working group says U.S. owes reparations for slavery, mass incarceration

In its report, it specifically dwells on the extrajudicial murders that were a product of an era of white supremacy:

Lynching was a form of racial terrorism that has contributed to a legacy of racial inequality that the United States must address. Thousands of people of African descent were killed in violent public acts of racial control and domination and the perpetrators were never held accountable.

The reparations could come in a variety of forms, according to the panel, including “a formal apology, health initiatives, educational opportunities … psychological rehabilitation, technology transfer and financial support, and debt cancellation.”

To be sure, such initiatives are nowhere in the cards, even after the question of reparations arose again two years ago when surfaced by the groundbreaking work of American journalist Ta-Nehisi Coates.

Separately, a coalition of Caribbean nations is calling for reparations from their former European imperial powers for the impact of slavery, colonial genocide and the toxic racial laws that shaped life for the past two centuries in these countries. Their efforts are fitful, and so far not so fruitful.

When asked by reporters to comment on the tone of the American presidential election campaign on Monday, the working group’s chairman, Ricardo A. Sunga of the Philippines, expressed concern about “hate speech … xenophobia [and] Afrophobia” that he felt was prevalent in the campaign, although he didn’t specifically call out Republican candidate Donald Trump.

“We are very troubled that these are on the rise,” said Sunga.

Share or comment on this article

Advertisements
%d bloggers like this: