Tina Toon Tuesday, “Feed Me Stupid!”

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, Democrat Socialist, is the gift that keeps on giving.

Every time she opens her mouth she gives us plenty of material for a new cartoon!

Socialism has never worked, see latest example Venezuela.

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez also wants to:

• Abolish Prisons

• Abolish ICE

• Abolish Borders

• Abolish Profit

A stink weed by any other name is still a stink weed!

Tina

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How metal from cremated bodies is being sold off… and recycled into road signs and aircraft engines

  • Dutch company OrthoMetals, behind the recycling, says half Britain’s 260 crematoriums have signed up to scheme
  • Generates 75 tons of metal a year
  • Money made from steel hips, plates and screws goes to charity

Metal body parts from the dead are being recycled into road signs, car parts and  aircraft engines.

Steel hips, plates and screws used in legs and skulls are collected after cremation and sold on – with money raised going to charity.

Even metal plates from false teeth and old fillings are recovered and re-used, together with metal fittings on coffins.

High-value metals that survive the 1,000-degree furnace are sold for use in the automobile and aeronautical industries.

article-2307737-193B9834000005DC-98_638x415OrthoMetals, the Dutch company behind the recycling, says around half Britain’s 260 crematoriums have signed up to the scheme, which is generating 75 tons of metal a year

Cheap metals are smelted down and sold for general use – including road signs, motorway barriers and lamp posts. High-value metals, such as cobalt, which are found in some implants and dental work, are used in aircraft engines

These include cobalt and titanium, which are found in some implants and dental work, with the former used in aircraft engines.

Other, less-valuable metals are smelted down and sold for more general use – including road signs, motorway barriers and  lamp posts.

Money made is donated to charity and almost £1million has been raised for good causes since the project began in Britain in 2004.

OrthoMetals, the Dutch company behind the recycling, says around half Britain’s 260 crematoriums have signed up to the scheme, which is generating 75 tons of metal a year.

Before cremations, relatives are asked if they want to keep metal parts of loved ones.

The vast majority say they have no need for them and sign a consent form agreeing to the recycling.

When the cremation is over, the ashes and other remaining items go into a compartment in the cremator and then into a special cremulator machine which separates any metal from remaining pieces of bone.

article-2307737-193B9828000005DC-669_636x535When the cremation is over, the ashes and other remaining items go into a compartment in the cremator and then into a special cremulator machine which separates any metal from remaining pieces of bone. High-value metals that survive the 1,000-degree furnace (above) are sold for use in the automobile and aeronautical industries

The metal is then loaded into large bins and taken away. At those crematoriums not signed up to the scheme, metal body parts are buried in the grounds, but new legislation means this will no longer be possible.

Ruud Verberne, owner of OrthoMetals, said: ‘Metals reclaimed from cremations are being increasingly re-used. High-value metals such as cobalt go into the aircraft or automotive industries.

‘Others are sold to smelters and foundries and it is possible that they end up as road signs or motorway barriers – there’s no way of knowing.

‘What is important is that the metals are being recycled, and this is a growing business both in Britain and elsewhere in Europe.’

One of the crematoriums in the scheme, at Weston-super-Mare in Somerset, says it fills one large bin a month with the unwanted metal body parts.

The recycling schemes are governed by strict criteria set down by the Institute of Cemetery and Crematorium Management.

article-2307737-193B9870000005DC-316_636x421

The recycling schemes are governed by strict criteria set down by the Institute of Cemetery and Crematorium Management

And it may not only be metal from medical procedures that can be recovered from the deceased.

In October last year, the family of a war veteran were amazed when they were handed his ashes containing almost 1lb of shrapnel.

Ronald Brown, who died aged 94, had stepped on a landmine while serving in northern France during the Second World War.

The explosion filled his left leg with shards of metal and he was forced to crawl two miles to safety.

The shrapnel was left in his body because the primitive medical facilities on the battlefield meant it was safer not to remove it. Mr Brown told his children there was ‘a bullet’ in his leg.

His daughter Jane Madden said: ‘When we went to scatter his ashes, we asked whether the bullet had been found and they gave us this bag full of metal.’

article-2307737-193B9969000005DC-439_634x361Before cremations, relatives are asked if they want to keep metal parts of loved ones

How metal from cremated bodies is being sold off… and recycled into road signs and aircraft engines

More People Sickened By Parasite In Outbreak Linked To McDonald’s Salads

iu

More illnesses have been reported across the United States in two separate cyclospora outbreaks, federal health officials said Thursday.

In less than a week, the number of cases of reported illness from eating McDonald’s salads rose from 61 to 163.

The US Food and Drug Administration announced the latest count on Thursday: 163 people in 10 states, which includes three hospitalizations and no deaths. The FDA is working with McDonald’s to identify the salad ingredients making people sick and to trace them through the supply chain.

As a precaution, McDonald’s has stopped selling the salads in 3,000 fast food restaurants in 14 states to try to contain the outbreak, the FDA said. The states are Illinois, Iowa, Indiana, Wisconsin, Michigan, Ohio, Minnesota, Nebraska, South Dakota, Montana, North Dakota, Kentucky, West Virginia and Missouri.

Meanwhile, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported 237 cases of cyclosporiasis in people who reportedly consumed Del Monte Fresh vegetable trays containing broccoli, cauliflower, carrots and dill dip. The reports came from four states, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Michigan and Iowa. Seven people were hospitalized and no deaths were reported.

A recall was issued on June 15 of 6-ounce, 12-ounce and 28-ounce trays containing those items in clear, plastic clamshell packaging. Trays have a “Best if used by” date of June 17, 2018 and were sold at Kwik Trip, Kwik Star, Demond’s, Sentry, Potash, Meehan’s, Country Market, FoodMax Supermarket, and Peapod stores in Iowa, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Illinois, Indiana and Michigan.

Health officials said there was no evidence to suggest that the cluster of illnesses linked to McDonald’s salads is related to the ongoing cyclospora outbreak linked to Del Monte Fresh vegetable trays.

The cyclospora parasite causes intestinal illness as a result of consuming contaminated food or water.

The symptoms, which can begin a week or more after consuming the parasite, include diarrhea and frequent, sometimes explosive bowel movements, according to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Those infected can experience loss of appetite, weight loss, stomach cramps or pain, nausea, gas and fatigue. Vomiting, headache, fever, body aches and flu-like symptoms can also occur.

The illness can last from a few days to a few months and patients might feel better, then get worse again. Patients can be treated with antibiotics.