R. Kelly sexually abused teenage boy he met in McDonald’s and bribed officials for information about his legal case, prosecutors allege

R. Kelly appears in court in Chicago in 2019.
Antonio Perez/Associated Press
  • New York prosecutors filed a 55-page motion seeking permission to admit new evidence in R. Kelly’s trial.
  • The filing alleges that Kelly bribed officials and sexually abused underage boys.
  • The disgraced R&B singer is due to stand trial on August 9 in New York on racketeering charges.
  • Visit Insider’s homepage for more stories.

On Friday, prosecutors in New York filed a 55-page motion asking a judge for permission to admit new evidence in R. Kelly’s sexual abuse trial.

Federal prosecutors say they have evidence of several previously uncharged crimes committed by Kelly, including bribing officials for information and sexually abusing underage boys.

The R&B singer, whose real name is Robert Sylvester Kelly, 54, is set to face trial on August 9th in a federal court in New York. He faces racketeering charges for allegedly running an elaborate criminal enterprise to kidnap and sexually exploit young women.

The original New York indictment from March 2020 refers to six victims. The latest court filing refers to 20 Jane Does, and 2 John Does, according to NPR.

One of the new allegations made by prosecutors is that in 2006 Kelly began a sexual relationship with a 17-year-old boy he met at a McDonald’s in Chicago.

According to the filing, the boy introduced Kelly to a second teenage boy aged 16 or 17, with who Kelly also had a sexual relationship with. Prosecutors allege that the singer coerced the second boy to have sex with others, which he often videotaped.

In the complaint, prosecutors added that they have a witness who claims Kelly made her download child pornography involving boys.

Prosecutors also allege that in 2019 R. Kelly bribed a Cook County clerk in Illinois in an attempt to gain information about his legal case following the release of the documentary series Surviving R. Kelly.

The document cites an audio recording of a phone call between Kelly and his “crisis manager.” They discuss bribing the clerk with $2,500 and providing them with a burner phone to relay information back to Kelly’s team.

Prosecutors also want to introduce evidence that in 1994 Kelly bribed an Illinois state employee with $500 to create a fake ID for the underage singer Aaliyah so that he could marry her. 

The court filing alleges that Kelly believed he had impregnated Aaliyah, then 15, and wanted to marry her, so she could not be made to testify against him in court. Aaliyah died in a plane crash in 2001.

Prosecutors also want to play videos and audio recordings for the jury, showing Kelly physically and verbally abusing women.

Other allegations in the filing include unlawful imprisonment, hush-money payments, and physical abuse.

Kelly remains in prison in Brooklyn and has pleaded not guilty to all the charges against him.

In addition to the New York trial, Kelly also faces charges of possessing child pornography and obstructing federal agents by bribing his victims in a separate case in Chicago, Illinois.

The Chicago trial is currently scheduled for September. 

If you are a survivor of sexual assault, you can call the National Sexual Assault Hotline at 800.656.HOPE (4673) or visit their website to receive confidential support.

The Satanic Temple Celebrates First Symbolic Satanic Monument on Public Property

Satanists to host ritual in Maryland to honor the “Bladensburg Satanic Peace Cross”

SALEM, Mass., July 7, 2021 /PRNewswire/ — In response to a Supreme Court decision, The Satanic Temple has designated the 40-foot-tall Bladensburg Peace Cross in Maryland to be a Satanic icon. The Satanic Temple will be calling the monument “The Bladensburg Satanic Peace Cross” and will be hosting a ritual in honor of Satanist veterans at the Bladensburg site on July 10 at 5:00 PM.

40-foot-tall Bladensburg Satanic Peace Cross in Maryland

TST will be hosting a ritual in honor of Satanist veterans at the Bladensburg site on July 10 at 5:00 PM.

In 2019, the Supreme Court ruled in American Legion v. American Humanist Association that maintaining the Peace Cross on public land does not violate the Establishment Clause of the US Constitution. Delivering the decision, Justice Alito wrote that “The Bladensburg Cross has come to represent… a place for the community to gather and honor all veterans and their sacrifices for this Nation…”

TST spokesman and co-founder Lucien Greaves notes, “Deciding that the Bladensburg Cross does not just represent Christians, but people of all faiths including Satanists, is a kind of blasphemy that is consistent with Satanism. As a symbol for all veterans, the Cross represents Satanist veterans who we are honoring in our ceremony.”

TST has a long tradition of supporting its military members. This has included assisting TST members who want to organize prayer at the US Naval Academy, the appointment of lay leaders to establish a religious ministry in the US military, and the construction of a veterans memorial that was intended to be erected in Minnesota.

While Belle Plaine, MN, has the distinction of being the first city to approve a Satanic monument, consistent with the Supreme Court ruling, Bladensburg, MD, is the first city to actually have The Satanic Temple-designated Satanic monument on state property.

Greaves added, “The Satanic Temple will refer to the memorial as the Bladensburg Satanic Peace Cross. We expect the celebration of this Satanic icon will be a recurring event, and we encourage Satanists everywhere to make pilgrimages to Bladensburg. Outside of Salem, MA, we expect Bladensburg will become known internationally as a destination for Satanists.”

About The Satanic Temple
The mission of The Satanic Temple is to encourage benevolence and empathy among all people, reject tyrannical authority, advocate practical common sense and justice, and be directed by the human conscience to undertake noble pursuits guided by the individual will.

China Horror As Military Harvests DNA From Millions Of Women To ‘Engineer New Viruses’

Gordon Chang warns next disease could be far more deadly than COVID-19

The Peoples Republic of China (PRC) has been collecting people’s DNA for years, and according to Gordon Chang, author of ‘The Coming Collapse of China,’ the country’s sinister motivations should be of great concern to the United States.

With over 80 million health profiles, China has the largest DNA database in the world, and growing. In an interview with Fox News, Chang warned that China plans to use this information to create bioweapons designed to target specific ethnic groups.

“The coronavirus is not the last pathogen that will be generated from Chinese soil. And so we’ve got to be concerned that the next disease is more transmissible and more deadly than the novel coronavirus,” said Chang.

China reportedly collects the DNA of its own citizens for purposes of law enforcement, tracking down dissidents, and forming a tightly controlled surveillance state.

They have also found ways to obtain the DNA of foreigners, including Americans.  

How exactly do they get this sensitive information?

“Buying American companies which have DNA profiles, subsidizing DNA analysis for ancestry companies, and hacking,” said Chang.

For example, in 2015 it was discovered that the PRC hacked Anthem, the second-largest insurance company in the U.S. Now the PRC is using the coronavirus to enlarge its DNA database by requiring internationally accepted QR codes for travel in and out of the country and using vaccine diplomacy.

“What they’re doing is they are saying: ‘We’ll get this vaccine to you but we need to complete our trials so we’re going to use your population as the test. If you don’t participate in these trials, you’re not getting the Chinese vaccines,’” said Chang.

He continued, “Beijing is trying to extend its influence by making its vaccine available.” While, at the same time, “collecting very sensitive information about people outside China.”

China currently has five coronavirus vaccine candidates that have reached phase 3 clinical trials.  The final phase of trials has been rolled out in at least 16 countries including BrazilTurkeyMorocco, and UAE.

China’s reasons for wanting this information involve dominating the biotechnology industry which “is very important to them,” said Chang.

“They included it in their ‘Made in China 2025’ initiative, he pointed out, “which is a decade long program to dominate certain industries.”

The second reason is something much more sinister, “China is probably trying to develop diseases that target not just everybody, but target only certain ethnic or racial groups.”

According to Chang, genetic data gives China the ability to create bioweapons that can target certain groups of people. Furthermore, he said the country’s behavior of collecting the DNA of foreigners while prohibiting Chinese DNA to foreign researchers supports this theory.

“We’ve got to be extremely concerned because that is not consistent with a country that wants to cooperate with the rest of the world. That is consistent with a country developing biological weapons,” he warned.  

“People have said biological weapons don’t work. Well, we do know they work because we had the coronavirus, which may or may not have been a biological weapon,” Chang clarified, “but we do know that it crippled the United States and that’s what Beijing is really looking for.”

Now that China has had proof of concept, Chang urged the United States to act swiftly and prevent the superpower from obtaining any more American DNA.

“We should not allow any Chinese or Chinese affiliated organization to test DNA of Americans. And we’ve got to say to China, either you agree to an inspections regime or we’re pulling out of the biological weapons convention.”

China has denied allegations that the coronavirus pandemic, which some believe emerged from a government lab in Wuhan, was a biological weapon. In 1984 the PRC signed the Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention (BWC) treaty in 1984 which prohibits them from developing, producing or stockpiling biological or toxin weapons.

Cops Beat Black Man With Handcuffs Like ‘Brass Knuckles’ and Pulled Down His Pants

SCREENSHOT OF BODY CAMERA FOOTAGE SHOWING FORMER HOUSTON POLICE DEPARTMENT OFFICER LUCAS VIEIRA CHASING AND APPREHENDING AUNDRE HOWARD. (VIDEO COURTESY OF KALLINEN LAW) 

One officer has been fired and is facing 99 years in prison.

When Aundre Howard, a Black man, fled from Houston police during a traffic stop in 2019, one of the officers was caught on body camera footage telling his partner to “shoot his ass” as they pursued. When that officer finally caught up to Howard, he used a pair of handcuffs wrapped around his left hand like a pair of brass knuckles to repeatedly punch the fleeing man in the back of the head.

Now, the former police officer is facing prison time.

Lucas Vieira, 31, a four-year-veteran with the Houston Police Department, was indicted by a Harris County District Court grand jury on July 9. Two days later, the Houston Police Department announced that it had fired Vieira months ago, in April. If convicted, he faces up to 99 years in prison as well as a $10,000 fine.

The indictment also comes just over three months after Howard, 34, filed a federal civil rights lawsuit accusing Vieira of unjustly striking him and of violating his right to unjust search and due process.

“Mr. Howard suffered great pain, contusions, humiliation, anxiety, fear, loss of sleep, headaches, and other mental anguish as a result of the defendant’s actions,” according to the lawsuit, which was provided to VICE News by Howard’s attorney, Randall Kallinen. 

“My client is very pleased that the officer was indicted because it validates what he’s been concerned about for a while,” Kallinen told VICE News. “He does feel better that when officers injure people like himself, they do have to face justice just like anybody else would.”

The encounter with police occurred July 7, 2019, when Vieira initiated a stop on Howard’s vehicle for a traffic violation. According to Vieira’s attorney James Siscoe, police noticed marijuana on Howard’s center console when they first approached the car during the traffic stop, prompting a search. Police placed Howard in handcuffs, but they found nothing. As Officer Serrano began to put on rubber gloves for a cavity search, Howard began to run from police toward a nearby freeway, according to the lawsuit.

As he pursued, Vieira screamed out “just fucking shoot his ass, shoot his ass,” and belts out gun shots noises, according to police body camera footage.

The chase only lasted one city block before Vieria caught up with Howard, who’d pooped his pants he was so afraid, according to the lawsuit. The officer then allegedly used his handcuffs as “brass knuckles” and bashed Howard in the back of the head at least three times. Howard, who says he fled in fear of his life, can be heard telling officers “alright, you got it!” as Vieira throws the punches, according to body camera footage. 

Siscoe says his client only hit Howard in the shoulder and that only one of the hits managed to strike the man in the head. He also says that Serrano found 18 grams of cocaine immediately next to where officers caught up with Howard.

When Howard was brought back to the vehicle, the officers on the scene—Vieira’s partner Thomas Serrano and officer Nadeem Aslam, who are also named in the lawsuit— pulled down his pants, exposing his buttocks and genitalia to passersby and made fun of him as he lay there covered in feces.

The lawsuit also alleges that the officers pushed his arms over his head from behind as a pain technique as he lay there handcuffed and defenseless.

“Despite knowing about Vieira’s and other HPD officer’s policy violations, no officer reported any other officer nor was an [Internal Affairs Division] complaint filed by any officer,” the lawsuit alleges.

Howard was initially charged with felony evading arrest and possession of cocaine, but those charges were dropped, according to Houston Public Media.

Vieira’s attorney, James Siscoe, says that his client was unjustly indicted. Not only was he not allowed to present evidence to the grand jury, Vieira’s superiors reviewed the available bodycam footage at the time and concluded that his actions were justified.

“By taking immediate and decisive action in response to Howard’s reckless and dangerous actions, Lucas and his partner probably saved both Howard’s life and possibly that of other motorists on the freeway,” Siscoe said.

Howard’s lawsuit also lists Sgt. Earl Attebury, who arrived after Howard was back in police custody and didn’t reprimand Vieira after he allegedly admitted to using force, as well as former chief of police Art Acevedo, and the city of Houston. 

Howard is seeking damages for the pain, suffering and mental anguish he experienced as a result of this encounter, according to the lawsuit. He also says that the defendants are liable for punitive damages as well as his attorney fees relating to the case.

Local rapper who had ‘just been released’ from Cook County Jail suffered as many as 64 bullet wounds in fatal shooting across the street from jail, police say

Three people were shot, including a man who died after he suffered dozens of bullet wounds, during an apparent ambush as he was released from the Cook County Jail on electronic monitoring Saturday night, according to Chicago police.

Fifty-nine shell casings littered the 2700 block of West 27th Street in Little Village — across the street from the jail — around 8:50 p.m. The 31-year-old man was taken to Mount Sinai Hospital, where he was pronounced dead at 9:25 p.m., according to police and the Cook County medical examiner’s office.

A police report identified the man, known locally as a rapper, as Londre Sylvester, though the medical examiner’s office said it had not notified next of kin of his death Sunday. The police report said Sylvester suffered as many as 64 bullet wounds to his head and other parts of his body, however a full autopsy report detailing his injuries won’t be released for weeks.

A 60-year-old woman who was with him was shot in the knee, and she was in good condition at Stroger Hospital, police said. A Cook County sheriff’s office spokesman referred all questions about the case to Chicago police. Attempts to reach the 60-year-old woman who was shot were unsuccessful.

Chicago police and sheriff’s office personnel investigate the scene just outside the Leighton Criminal Court Building in Chicago on Aug. 18, 2017, after Kenneth Williams was shot a few blocks away from the courthouse. (Antonio Perez / Chicago Tribune)

A second woman, a 30-year-old who was walking in the area at the time, suffered a graze wound to her mouth, according to a police report. She was said to be in good condition when taken to Mount Sinai Hospital.

The suspects reentered their vehicles and fled the scene in different directions, the police report said. Chicago police learned there were surveillance cameras in the area to review for evidence.

“It appears Sylvester was the intended target while (the women) were inadvertently struck,” the police report states.

Sylvester had “just been released” from custody and was fitted for electronic monitoring “as a condition of his bail,” the police report said. He and the 60-year-old woman were walking “to an awaiting vehicle when several unknown (suspects) exited two separate vehicles and all began to shoot in Sylvester’s direction, striking him numerous times,” the police report said.

Late last month, prosecutors hit Sylvester with a petition for violation of bail bond for violating the conditions of his release in a 2020 felony gun case.

On July 1, a judge ordered Sylvester held on $50,000 bail. According to court records, Sylvester was able to post the required $5,000 bail on Friday

This was not the first time such a seemingly orchestrated attack occurred outside the jail or its neighboring courthouse.

On March 6, 2017, a 23-year-old man who beat a murder case was shot and killed minutes after leaving the jail. Kamari Belmont was released on $100,000 bail — after his friend posted the necessary $10,000 to get him out of lockup — while he was being held on remaining robbery charges.

Belmont was a few blocks from the jail on California Avenue when a white SUV pulled up to his car, and someone from the SUV opened fire, striking Belmont several times and killing him, police have said.

Belmont had been held in the jail on murder and robbery charges after, authorities contend, he shot a man during a robbery in 2015 and robbed someone else a few hours later. The man who authorities believed Belmont shot died weeks later.

But Cook County prosecutors dropped the murder charges at the end of January 2017 after allowing too much time to elapse under the state’s speedy trial statute, according to court records and Belmont’s lawyer. The robbery charges remained, however.

Two weeks after Belmont was killed, a 21-year-old man suffered six gunshot wounds to the groin area on March 20, 2017, as he was walking to the Leighton Criminal Court Building, which is next to the jail. Someone from a white van opened fire. The 21-year-old was struck by gunfire, and he was taken to Mount Sinai in critical condition.

The man who was shot in the groin had a history of misdemeanor arrests but oddly wasn’t due in court the day he was shot. At the time, his lawyer said she didn’t know why he was going to the courthouse that day.

On Aug. 18, 2017, 28-year-old Kenneth Williams was shot and killed a few blocks away from the courthouse after an appearance in which he pleaded not guilty to a charge of driving on a revoked or suspended license, according to police and court records.

Police have said Williams apparently got into an argument with someone as he left the courthouse. He was in an SUV with a 26-year-old woman afterward, and they made it to about 31st and Rockwell streets when someone in another vehicle opened fire, striking Williams — who later died at Mount Sinai.

FDA expected to announce new warning on Johnson & Johnson vaccine related to rare autoimmune disorder

The agency plans to cite a link to a small number of Guillain-Barré cases after vaccination but will say the shot’s benefits outweigh the risk

The Johnson & Johnson coronavirus vaccine is a single shot, making it especially useful in areas where it might be harder to administer two shots. (Narendra Shrestha/EPA-EFE/Shutterstock)

The Food and Drug Administration is preparing to announce a new warning for the Johnson & Johnson coronavirus vaccine saying the shot has been linked to a serious but rare side effect called Guillain-Barré syndrome, in which the immune system attacks the nerves, according to four individuals familiar with the situation.

About 100 preliminary reports of Guillain-Barré have been detected in vaccine recipients after the administration of 12.8 million doses of Johnson & Johnson vaccine in the United States, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said in a statement Monday. The cases have largely been reported about two weeks after vaccination and mostly in men, many aged 50 and older. Most people fully recover from Guillain-Barré.

The warning on the Johnson & Johnson vaccine will be the latest blow to a shot that had been eagerly anticipated because of its ease of use — it requires only a single dose, which makes it especially helpful in immunizing harder-to-reach populations and regions. But the vaccine has been plagued by problems, including massive stumbles at its U.S. manufacturing plant.

The latest development comes at an especially fraught moment, as the highly transmissible delta variant sweeps the country and fuels an increase in coronavirus cases in many states. And the new warning could complicate Biden administration efforts to ramp up inoculations in areas where skepticism regarding coronavirus vaccines remains high and the vaccine rate is low.

Available data do not show a pattern suggesting a similar increased risk of Guillain-Barré with the Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna vaccines. More than 321 million doses of those vaccines — developed with a technology different than what is used to make the Johnson & Johnson vaccine — have been administered in the United States.

The Guillain-Barré cases are expected to be discussed as part of an upcoming meeting of the CDC’s Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices, the agency said.

Guillain-Barré syndrome usually occurs at a rate of about 60 to 120 cases each week, according to CDC data. While the cause is not fully understood, it often follows infection with a virus, including influenza, or bacteria. Each year in the United States, an estimated 3,000 to 6,000 people develop the illness.

People older than 50 are at greatest risk. About two-thirds of people who develop the syndrome experience symptoms several days or weeks after they have fallen ill with diarrhea or a lung or sinus illness.

Federal health officials are expected to emphasize that the Johnson & Johnson vaccine is safe and that its benefits clearly outweigh the potential risks, according to the people familiar with the situation.

Johnson & Johnson and the FDA declined Monday to comment.

Reports of Guillain-Barré in vaccine recipients are rare, the CDC said, “but do likely indicate a small possible risk of this side effect following” the Johnson & Johnson vaccine. Reports of the syndrome were made to an early-warning safety network run by the CDC and FDA, the Vaccine Adverse Events Reporting System. It collects information about possible side effects or health problems after vaccination. The system looks for unusual or unexpected patterns that require a closer look. Anyone can report a reaction or injury.

Experts said the latest news about the Johnson & Johnson shot may complicate vaccination efforts, especially in parts of the country where rates remain under 50 percent.

Jeanne Marrazzo, director of infectious-diseases at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, said the absolute risk of Guillain-Barré remains so rare that “it should not deter people from getting vaccinated,” she wrote in an email. If people are concerned, they can still get a Pfizer or Moderna vaccine with no risk, adding: “This news does not provide an excuse to remain unvaccinated!!!!”

But the expected warning on the Johnson & Johnson shot “quite possibly” will make it harder for health-care providers to persuade people to roll up their sleeves, Marrazzo said.

“When a person is hesitant to get a vaccine, any additional safety signal, even if very rare, just adds to their own database that fuels their reluctance,” Marrazzo wrote.

Paul A. Offit, a pediatrician and director of the Vaccine Education Center at Children’s Hospital of Pennsylvania, said he did not think the latest news will make much difference because the U.S. vaccination effort has “hit a wall.” The Biden administration has already done “as good a job as we could possibly hope for on how to mass produce, mass distribute and mass vaccinate” the country, Offit said.

Now, Offit said, it’s time for the next step: the government needs to compel vaccination. The Supreme Court has already ruled twice that public health authorities can take these measures in face of outbreaks, he said. Without such a step, the virus is “going to continue to mutate, continue to create variants” and result in another surge in late fall and winter, he said.

Just three months ago, federal officials paused use of the Johnson & Johnson vaccine after it was linked to another rare side effect — severe blood clots. That pause was lifted within days after an extensive safety review by the FDA and CDC, and a warning was added to the vaccine’s label.

The vaccine also has been hobbled by production problems at Johnson & Johnson’s subcontractor, Emergent BioSolutions, the only U.S. manufacturer of the vaccine. The Baltimore plant was shut down in April after federal officials discovered millions of doses had been contaminated with Astra Zeneca vaccine, which was also being made there.

Johnson & Johnson had to throw away the equivalent of about 75 million doses of the vaccine because of the problems at the Baltimore plant. About 40 million doses have been released for use. In response to the contamination, the Biden administration removed AstraZeneca manufacturing from the plant and put Johnson & Johnson in direct control of vaccine production there. But Emergent has not received authorization from the FDA to resume manufacturing the Johnson & Johnson product.

Other vaccines also have been associated with rare adverse events. The FDA in late June decided to add a warning to the Pfizer and Moderna coronavirus vaccines about extremely unusual cases of myocarditis — heart inflammation — in some young adults and teens after vaccination. Federal health officials said there was “a likely association,” and that the problem appears most likely to occur in young men after they receive two doses of the vaccine.

The CDC and the Department of Health and Human Services, together with 15 of the country’s leading medical and public health organizations, issued a joint statement in June saying they “strongly encourage everyone 12 and older” to get the Pfizer and Moderna shots because the benefit of vaccination far exceeds potential harm.

In June, the American Neurological Association reported that two studies published in the journal Annals of Neurology had found 11 cases of Guillain-Barré syndrome two to three weeks after vaccination with the AstraZeneca vaccine. The cases, which were from England and India, involved an unusual variant of the disease that caused severe facial weakness, the organization said. An accompanying editorial described a similar case involving a Boston man who received the Johnson & Johnson vaccine.

Vaccine safety officials in Europe have recommended that a warning be added about Guillain-Barré to the AstraZeneca vaccine. But the European safety committee said that while cases have been reported following vaccinations, “at this stage the available data neither confirms nor rules out a possible association with the vaccine.”

In 1976, there was a small increased risk of the syndrome after people received swine flu vaccine, which was a special flu shot for a potential pandemic strain of flu virus. A National Academy of Medicine review in 2003 found that people who received the 1976 swine flu vaccine had an increased risk of Guillain-Barré, with about one additional case for every 100,000 people who got the swine flu vaccine. The reason for the link remains unknown.

The CDC monitors for Guillain-Barré syndrome each flu season. The agency says the data on an association between seasonal influenza vaccine and the illness varied from season to season. When there has been an increased risk, it has consistently been in the range of one or two additional cases per 1 million flu vaccine doses administered. Studies also suggest it is more likely that a person will get Guillain-Barré after getting the flu than after vaccination, according to the CDC.

‘We’re Coming For Your Children’: Gay Men’s Choir Deletes ‘Tongue-In-Cheek’ Music Video Amid Backlash


The San Francisco Gay Men’s Chorus removed a music video from their public YouTube channel titled “A Message From the Gay Community,” in which the group sings “we’re coming for your children.”

The chorus released a statement July 1, claiming that the intent was “tongue-in-cheek humor,” also alleging that the chorus has reached out to law enforcement about hate messages and “threats of harm.” Moderators of major social media platforms are also contacted to take down copies of the original video that was made private, according to the statement.

“Gen Z’s gayer than Grindr…We’re coming for them. We’re coming for your children… The gay agenda is here,” the chorus group sang, appearing to make fun of parents who are concerned for their children with the push of LGBTQ agenda by the media, according to the initial report by Not the Bee July 7. While the video is no longer available on their official YouTube channel, it can be found on Rumble.

The viral music video caused a backlash of criticism, including from religious leadersand conservatives.

The authors of the song claimed that the original intent is to use epithets of anti-LGBT “willful intolerence and aggressive hate” for “an obviously tongue and cheek song.”

The San Francisco Gay Men’s Chorus was founded in 1978 to “inspire activism, and foster compassion at home and around the world,” with one of its values stating “evolve society’s views toward LGBTQ people through our commitment to excellence,” according to their mission statement

The Daily Caller has reached out to the San Francisco Gay Men’s Chorus but did not receive an immediate comment.

Thug, 34, who beat up ‘very attractive’ transgender woman when he discovered she had male genitalia after she performed a sex act on him is jailed for 16 months

  • Suhel Sood, 34, attacked the woman at a party in Reading in November 2020
  • During a sexual encounter, Sood discovered that she had male genitals and savagely beat her, leaving her with two black eyes and a huge bruise on her leg
  • He admitted assault causing bodily harm and was cleared of sexual assault
  • Judge Emma Knott said Sood had shown ‘no real remorse’ over the attack

A man has been jailed for 16 months for beating up a transgender woman after discovering she had male genitalia.

Suhel Sood, 34, attacked his ‘attractive’ victim, who has not been named for legal reasons, during an encounter at a party in Reading in which she performed a sex act on him.

Sood reached down towards the woman’s privates and found that she had male genitalia, Reading Crown Court heard on Monday.

He roared: ‘You’re a man!’ before launching a brutal assault on the woman, punching her repeatedly and slamming her head down on a washing machine.

The victim was called a ‘dog’ and forced by Sood to mop up her own blood before he allowed her to leave the party on November 14 2020. 

She had arrived earlier in the evening with a married man who was believed to be her partner.

The court heard how the woman had been left with two black eyes and ‘one continuous huge bruise from the thigh to the knee.’ 

Sood was cleared of sexual assault but jailed for 16 months after he admitted assault causing actual bodily harm.

A man has been jailed for 16 months for beating up a transgender woman after discovering she had male genitalia. Suhel Sood, 34, attacked his ‘attractive’ victim, who has not been named, during an encounter at a party in Reading in which she performed a sex act on him

Prosecutor Oliver Weetch told the court that the assault ‘arose entirely from Mr Sood discovering that she [the victim] was transgender and thereafter assaulting her.’ 

Tom Holmes, defending, asked the judge not to sentence Sood on the basis that he targeted the victim based on prejudice.

‘His behaviour on that night was of course despicable. It gives an impression of him as a reckless, aggressive and frankly unlikable human being,’ Holmes said.

Judge Emma Knott told Sood he was ‘partying in a garage with others’ when the victim turned up with her partner – a married man who left early.

‘You were happy to entertain his girlfriend,’ the judge said

‘You were even happy to entertain his girlfriend after Billy went home to his wife. You were in the company of an attractive woman’.

In the course of consensual sexual activity, Sood discovered this ‘undeniably attractive woman was transgender’, the judge said.

‘And then things took a very ugly turn. You were perhaps fuelled by whiskey and cocaine and flew into a rage. From that moment, you had no concern at all for the woman.

‘You were concerned only by your own feelings. What you were concerned about was your reputation for fear of being a laughing stock. You sought to blame her. You threw words around like ‘deceit’. You accused her of raping you. There is no culpability on your part.

‘She is a woman, that is how she identifies.’

Judge Knott added: ‘Frankly, if you weren’t prepared to take the time to know more about her that is on you.

‘Maybe you will be a bit more careful in the future.

‘You discovered in your mind too late, you lost your temper. You hit her multiple times to the face, head and ear. Both eyes were black… her left eye was completely bloodshot. She had one continuous huge bruise from the thigh to the knee. And all of those were caused by you.

Speaking at Reading Crown Court (pictured) on Monday, Judge Emma Knott said Sood had ‘demonstrated no real remorse’ over the November 14 2020 attack

‘I am not sentencing you on the basis you inflicted those injuries with a spanner or a tool. You must have hit her very hard. This was a repeated and quite sustained assault… it must have been.

‘You have demonstrated no real remorse about your attack on her that night….. particularly that element of you making her clean up her own blood.

‘As if her transgender identity meant you would be contaminated by touching her own blood.’

The judge also noted Sood called his victim many names, including a ‘dog’.

Sood, of Reading, admitted assault occasioning actual bodily harm.

He was cleared of sexual assault, false imprisonment, attempting to cause grievous bodily harm charges and threats to kill.

Thug who beat up transgender woman when he discovered she had male genitalia is jailed for 16 months

Preacher and former alderman accused of sexual assault of an underage male child

The Camden Police Department is seeking information on the whereabouts of Phillip Michael Gordon, a preacher and former alderman for the City of Camden, wanted for 1st degree sexual assault.

Gordon is described as a black male, 5’11” tall weighing 205 lbs with black hair and brown eyes,

Please call 836-5755 if you have any information.

According to a report from the Camden Police Department, on March 14 2021 an officer was dispatched to the lobby of the Camden Police Department to make contact with a juvenile male who was accompanied by his mother and grandmother.

The juvenile stated that he was picked up from his house around 10:45 p.m.or 11:00 p.m. by Gordon. The juvenile stated that Gordon had been mentoring him since last October when they met at the juvenile’s mother’s wedding. He stated that Gordon was helping him cope with anger problems.

According to the report, Gordon brought the juvenile back to Gordon’s residence, where the juvenile got tired and went to sleep on the couch. Due to couch being cluttered, Gordon told the juvenile to go to sleep in his bed. The juvenile said he awoke later to Gordon engaging in oral sex with him and that there was semen on the juvenile’s shirt.

The juvenile stated he then hit Gordon in the head causing Gordon to leave and then go to a bathroom. The juvenile called his grandfather stating that “he touched me” and he needed to leave Gordon’s house. The juvenile told Gordon that he needed to go home because he was in trouble. According to the juvenile, Gordon told him “don’t tell anyone.”

The juvenile’s shirt was handed over to CPD as evidence and a sexual assault kit was obtained. At some point in time, cheek swabs were conducted on Gordon, as well as hair samples taken.

On June 15, Judge Hamilton Singleton issued a warrant for Gordon’s arrest.

Viral images show people of color as anti-Asian perpetrators. Don’t believe your lying eyes, It’s really White people attacking Asians!

A new analysis reveals misconceptions about perpetrators, victims, and the general environment around anti-Asian hate incidents. These can have “long-term consequences for racial solidarity,” researcher Janelle Wong said.

Activists participate in a vigil in response to the Atlanta spa shootings March 17, 2021 in the Chinatown area of Washington, DC.Alex Wong / Getty Images

June 15, 2021, 2:47 PM EDTBy Kimmy Yam

While news reports and social media have perpetuated the idea that anti-Asian violence is committed mostly by people of color, a new analysis shows the majority of attackers are white.

Janelle Wong, a professor of American Studies at the University of Maryland, College Park, released analysis last week that drew on previously published studies on anti-Asian bias. She found official crime statistics and other studies revealed more than three-quarters of offenders of anti-Asian hate crimes and incidents, from both before and during the pandemic, have been white, contrary to many of the images circulating online.

Wong told NBC Asian America that such dangerous misconceptions about who perpetrates anti-Asian hate incidents can have “long-term consequences for racial solidarity.”

“The way that the media is covering and the way that people are understanding anti-Asian hate at this moment, in some ways, draws attention to these long-standing anti-Asian biases in U.S. society,” Wong said. “But the racist kind of tropes that come along with it — especially that it’s predominantly Black people attacking Asian Americans who are elderly — there’s not really an empirical basis in that.”

Wong examined nine sources and four types of data about anti-Asian hate incidents, including from the reporting forum Stop AAPI Hate, Pew Research, as well as official law enforcement statistics, the majority of them spanning the year and a half when the #StopAAPIHate hashtag was trending. She found major contradictions in the prevailing narrative around perpetrators, victims, and the general environment of racism toward Asian Americans during the coronavirus pandemic. She said such misleading conclusions could be attributed to the lack of context around images, the failure to amplify all aspects of the data or misinterpretations of the research.

A misread of a frequently cited study from this year, published in the American Journal of Criminal Justice, likely contributed to the spread of erroneous narratives, Wong said. The study, which examined hate crime data from 1992 to 2014, found that compared to anti-Black and anti-Latino hate crimes, a higher proportion of perpetrators of anti-Asian hate crimes were people of color. Still, 75 percent of perpetrators were white.

Other studies confirm the findings, Wong wrote. She pointed to separate research from the University of Michigan Virulent Hate Project, which examined media reports about anti-Asian incidents last year and found that upward of 75 percentof news stories identified perpetrators as male and white in instances of physical or verbal assault and harassment when the race of the perpetrator was confirmed. Wong said the numbers could even be an underestimate.

“This is really how crime is framed in the United States — it’s framed as the source is Black,” Wong said.

Karthick Ramakrishnan, founder of AAPI Data, a data and civic engagement nonprofit group, for which Wong also works, said that the public’s perception of perpetrators and victims is largely formed by the images that have been widely circulated — but that they aren’t representative of most anti-Asian bias incidents. For example, the videos that have gone viral are more likely to be from low-income, urban areas where there is more surveillance, he said.

“You have security camera videos that are more available and prevalent in certain types of urban settings. And so that’s what’s available to people in terms of sharing,” Ramakrishnan said. “The videos are more viral than if it’s something that doesn’t have any imagery or video connected to it, like something that’s happening in the suburbs, for example.”

When they are circulated, they play on a loop with no audio. Even though the videos alone don’t provide much detail about what’s happening, they dominate our perceptions, Ramakrishnan said.

“There’s just something so powerful about these visual images so that no matter what the social science might say, people believe their eyes and especially the images that get played on repeat now,” he said.

Ramakrishnan said anti-Blackness among Asian Americans and the diaspora could also affect how such images are disseminated. Often, videos that confirm prejudices are shared not only on U.S. social networks but also on international messaging apps.

“These kinds of images and narratives of racial tension — Black violence on Asian people — are getting shared in Asia, as well. There is a transnational component to it,” he said. “Whatever aspect of anti-Black racism or racial prejudice that some Asian Americans might have will also matter, in terms of what ends up being more prominent, because these go to social networks, especially through social networks apps, as well.”

Wong said many erroneous assumptions persist about the identities of victims and the types of hate incidents they have confronted. She said there’s a widely held belief that such incidents are generally violent, when studies show that most of the racism Asian Americans have faced because of the pandemic is verbal harassment or shunning. Wong said that although older Asian women are typically thought of as the victims of such crimes, research shows that about 7 percent of reported incidents have involved anyone over 60.

Wong said that while any hate crime or incident is unacceptable, the astronomical increases often reported in headlines don’t capture the full picture of anti-Asian hate. The baseline for anti-Asian hate crimes and incidents has been relatively low, meaning a small growth in the total number of hate incidents can lead to large percentage increases. For example, data indicate that the largest increase occurred in New York City, which jumped from three to 28 anti-Asian hate crimes from 2019 to 2020, about an 833 percent surge. Meanwhile, Sacramento, California, increased from one to eight anti-Asian crimes from 2019 to 2020 — a small jump in raw numbers that equates to an increase of 700 percent.

“Even in jurisdictions reporting the most dramatic year-over-year increases in hate crimes, like New York City, the rate was lower than the proportion of Asian Americans in the population,” Wong said.

Asian Americans aren’t the only racial group that has met challenges during the pandemic. Wong said official law enforcement statistics show that in the 26 largest jurisdictions, which include areas like New York City, anti-Asian hate crimes accounted for 6.3 percent of all reported hate crimes.

Black Americans have long faced higher rates of hate crimes. Even though official 2019 law enforcement data show a drop in anti-Black hate crime reports, Black people were still, by far, the most targeted racial group, Wong said. That year, 58 percent of reported hate crimes were motivated by anti-Black bias, while a far smaller proportion, 4 percent, were motivated by anti-Asian bias. About 14 percent were motivated by anti-Latino bias.

Last year, when Asian Americans dealt with coronavirus-specific stereotypes, 27 percent of Asian Americans reported having ever experienced hate crimes or incidents, while 34 percent of Black Americans did, according to an AAPI Data survey.

“People overestimate the degree to which they, individually, are likely to be the victim of the crime. And so what we’re seeing right now, because there’s so much media coverage — even though we see that Asian Americans account for, no matter how you cut it, a minority of the hate crimes in any place — they feel like they’re the most likely to be attacked,” she said.

That isn’t to say that increases haven’t occurred or that verbal harassment and such incidents aren’t of concern, Wong said. There has been a marked increase in discrimination toward Asian Americans that deserves attention. But selectively amplifying aspects of the issue or omitting context can further perpetuate dangerous stereotypes and break opportunities for solidarity among marginalized groups, she said. Ramakrishnan said that when people reach for policy solutions based on insufficient information, they may not solve the issue.

Ramakrishnan called on the media and other institutions not only to add more context to information, but also to draw responsible conclusions from the data. He also emphasized that while the media are hyperfocused on anti-Asian crimes, Asian American and Pacific Islanders deal with a vast range of issues, including language barriers and immigration struggles, which aren’t captured in coverage of pandemic racism.

“Nuance is difficult to get people to rally around and pay attention to. Sensationalism is what gets attention. But hopefully, it’s the nuance that keeps them there so they want to go deeper in their understanding,” Ramakrishnan said. “I’m hopeful that what got a lot of people to care and pay attention were these hate incidents and horrific crimes but hoping that what keeps people interested is understanding the larger set of issues that affect these American Pacific Islanders.”